Democratic convention, night one: Unitymania! Transcript: “Why I love this country,” by Michelle Obama; Update: Kennedy video added; Update: Michelle video added

posted at 6:21 pm on August 25, 2008 by Allahpundit

Airing live right now on C-SPAN. Watch over the web if you’re stuck at work without a TV. Here’s the schedule; they’re already well into the first half of the program, with Denver Mayor John Hickenlooper and race-baiting Obama mentor Emil Jones due to speak within the half hour. Your headliners this evening: Jimmy Carter, who’ll appear onstage and try not to talk; Ted Kennedy, who’ll heroically, er, drown the media coverage of fear and loathing between Hillary and Obama in a tidal wave of Absolute Moral Authority; and of course Michelle O, who’ll tell us how proud she’s been of America ever since Barack clinched the nomination and how she’ll go on being proud until at least Election Day. I won’t guarantee liveblogging but this thread will be our repository for convention news updates as the night rolls on so check back often. If anything video-worthy happens, we’ll have that too, of course.

In keeping with tonight’s theme, enjoy this report from ABC of Obamans and Clintonites screaming insults at each other and this one from the Observer of Terry McAuliffe kindly asking the Obama campaign to shut its face about Hillary already. Below you’ll find a sneak preview of tomorrow night’s headliner. The fat joke is cheap and unfair, but the rest more than atones.

Update: Will Michelle O play it soft or loud, soccer mom or firebrand? Expect plenty of carping from the left tomorrow in this vein if it’s the former.

Update: More unity: North Carolina businessman and friend of Billary Mark Erwin is votin’ McCain. “I think Joe Biden had it right when he said, ‘Some day he will be ready, but he’s not ready now.’”

Update: Halperin has a few highlights from Michelle O’s speech. It’s standard First Lady pap, no worse than any other spouse speech but no better. I wonder if they’re holding back some of the more political passages as a surprise.

Update: Caroline Kennedy’s introducing Teddy now. She looks like JFK, but she sure doesn’t speak like him.

Update: Kennedy’s onstage now. He looks darned good. From the news reports, I thought he’d be frail. Now he’s promising he’ll be there when the Senate convenes in January. It’s over now — 10 minutes long, with some obvious trouble with the Teleprompter at the end. The point was just to be there, I guess, so he did that.

Update: Here’s tonight’s speech as prepared for delivery. TNR will be disappointed. This is not the Michelle Obama we thought we knew.

As you might imagine, for Barack, running for President is nothing compared to that first game of basketball with my brother Craig.

I can’t tell you how much it means to have Craig and my mom here tonight. Like Craig, I can feel my dad looking down on us, just as I’ve felt his presence in every grace-filled moment of my life.

At six-foot-six, I’ve often felt like Craig was looking down on me too…literally. But the truth is, both when we were kids and today, he wasn’t looking down on me – he was watching over me.

And he’s been there for me every step of the way since that clear February day 19 months ago, when – with little more than our faith in each other and a hunger for change – we joined my husband, Barack Obama, on the improbable journey that’s brought us to this moment.

But each of us also comes here tonight by way of our own improbable journey.

I come here tonight as a sister, blessed with a brother who is my mentor, my protector and my lifelong friend.

I come here as a wife who loves my husband and believes he will be an extraordinary president.
I come here as a Mom whose girls are the heart of my heart and the center of my world – they’re the first thing I think about when I wake up in the morning, and the last thing I think about when I go to bed at night. Their future – and all our children’s future – is my stake in this election.

And I come here as a daughter – raised on the South Side of Chicago by a father who was a blue collar city worker, and a mother who stayed at home with my brother and20me. My mother’s love has always been a sustaining force for our family, and one of my greatest joys is seeing her integrity, her compassion, and her intelligence reflected in my own daughters.

My Dad was our rock. Although he was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis in his early thirties, he was our provider, our champion, our hero. As he got sicker, it got harder for him to walk, it took him longer to get dressed in the morning. But if he was in pain, he never let on. He never stopped smiling and laughing – even while struggling to button his shirt, even while using two canes to get himself across the room to give my Mom a kiss. He just woke up a little earlier, and worked a little harder.

He and my mom poured everything they had into me and Craig. It was the greatest gift a child can receive: never doubting for a single minute that you’re loved, and cherished, and have a place in this world. And thanks to their faith and hard work, we both were able to go on to college. So I know firsthand from their lives – and mine – that the American Dream endures.

And you know, what struck me when I first met Barack was that even though he had this funny name, even though he’d grown up all the way across the continent in Hawaii, his family was so much like mine. He was raised by grandparents who were working class folks just like my parents, and by a sing le mother who struggled to pay the bills just like we did. Like my family, they scrimped and saved so that he could have opportunities they never had themselves. And Barack and I were raised with so many of the same values: that you work hard for what you want in life; that your word is your bond and you do what you say you’re going to do; that you treat people with dignity and respect, even if you don’t know them, and even if you don’t agree with them.

And Barack and I set out to build lives guided by these values, and pass them on to the next generation. Because we want our children – and all children in this nation – to know that the only limit to the height of your achievements is the reach of your dreams and your willingness to work for them.

And as our friendship grew, and I learned more about Barack, he introduced me to the work he’d done when he first moved to Chicago after college. Instead of heading to Wall Street, Barack had gone to work in neighborhoods devastated when steel plants shut down, and jobs dried up. And he’d been invited back to speak to people from those neighborhoods about how to rebuild their community.
The people gathered together that day were ordinary folks doing the best they could to build a good life. They were parents living paycheck to paycheck; grandparents trying to get by on a fixed income; men frustrated that they couldn’t support their familie s after their jobs disappeared. Those folks weren’t asking for a handout or a shortcut. They were ready to work – they wanted to contribute. They believed – like you and I believe – that America should be a place where you can make it if you try.

Barack stood up that day, and spoke words that have stayed with me ever since. He talked about “The world as it is” and “The world as it should be.” And he said that all too often, we accept the distance between the two, and settle for the world as it is – even when it doesn’t reflect our values and aspirations. But he reminded us that we know what our world should look like. We know what fairness and justice and opportunity look like. And he urged us to believe in ourselves – to find the strength within ourselves to strive for the world as it should be. And isn’t that the great American story?

It’s the story of men and women gathered in churches and union halls, in town squares and high school gyms – people who stood up and marched and risked everything they had – refusing to settle, determined to mold our future into the shape of our ideals.

It is because of their will and determination that this week, we celebrate two anniversaries: the 88th anniversary of women winning the right to vote, and the 45th anniversary of that hot summer day when Dr. King lifted our sights and our hearts with his dream for our nation.

I stand here today at the crosscurrents of that history – knowing that my piece of the American Dream is a blessing hard won by those who came before me. All of them driven by the same conviction that drove my dad to get up an hour early each day to painstakingly dress himself for work. The same conviction that drives the men and women I’ve met all across this country:

People who work the day shift, kiss their kids goodnight, and head out for the night shift – without disappointment, without regret – that goodnight kiss a reminder of everything they’re working for.

The military families who say grace each night with an empty seat at the table. The servicemen and women who love this country so much, they leave those they love most to defend it.

The young people across America serving our communities – teaching children, cleaning up neighborhoods, caring for the least among us each and every day.

People like Hillary Clinton, who put those 18 million cracks in the glass ceiling, so that our daughters – and sons – can dream a little bigger and aim a little higher.

People like Joe Biden, who’s never forgotten where he came from, and never stopped fighting for folks who work long hours and face long odds and need someone on their side again.

All of us driven by a simple belief that the world as it is just won’t do – that we have an obligation to fight for the world as it should be.

That is the thread that connects our hearts. That is the thread that runs through my journey and Barack’s journey and so many other improbable journeys that have brought us here tonight, where the current of history meets this new tide of hope.

That is why I love this country.

And in my own life, in my own small way, I’ve tried to give back to this country that has given me so much. That’s why I left a job at a law firm for a career in public service, working to empower young people to volunteer in their communities. Because I believe that each of us – no matter what our age or background or walk of life – each of us has something to contribute to the life of this nation.

It’s a belief Barack shares – a belief at the heart of his life’s work.

It’s what he did all those years ago, on the streets of Chicago, setting up job training to get people back to work and afterschool programs to keep kids safe – working block by block to help people lift up their families.

It’s what he did in the Illinois Senate, moving people from welfare to jobs, passing tax cuts for hard working families, and making sure women get equal pay for equal work.

It’s what he’s done in the United States Senate, fighting to ensure the men and women who serve this country are welcomed home not just with medals and parades, but with good jobs and benefits and health care – including mental health care.

That’s why he’s running – to end the war in Iraq responsibly, to build an economy that lifts every family, to make health care available for every American, and to make sure every child in this nation gets a world class education all the way from preschool to college. That’s what Barack Obama will do as President of the United States of America.

He’ll achieve these goals the same way he always has – by bringing us together and reminding us how much we share and how alike we really are. You see, Barack doesn’t care where you’re from, or what your background is, or what party – if any – you belong to. That’s not how he sees the world. He knows that thread that connects us – our belief in America’s promise, our commitment to our children’s future – is strong enough to hold us together as one nation even when we disagree.

It was strong enough to bring hope to those neighborhoods in Chicago.

It was strong enough to bring hope to the mother he met worried about her child in Iraq; hope to the man who’s unemployed, but can’t afford gas to find a job; hope to the student working nights to pay for her sister’s heal th care, sleeping just a few hours a day.

And it was strong enough to bring hope to people who came out on a cold Iowa night and became the first voices in this chorus for change that’s been echoed by millions of Americans from every corner of this nation.

Millions of Americans who know that Barack understands their dreams; that Barack will fight for people like them; and that Barack will finally bring the change we need.

And in the end, after all that’s happened these past 19 months, the Barack Obama I know today is the same man I fell in love with 19 years ago. He’s the same man who drove me and our new baby daughter home from the hospital ten years ago this summer, inching along at a snail’s pace, peering anxiously at us in the rearview mirror, feeling the whole weight of her future in his hands, determined to give her everything he’d struggled so hard for himself, determined to give her what he never had: the affirming embrace of a father’s love.

And as I tuck that little girl and her little sister into bed at night, I think about how one day, they’ll have families of their own. And one day, they – and your sons and daughters – will tell their own children about what we did together in this election. They’ll tell them how this time, we listened to our hopes, instead of our fears. How this time, we decided to stop doubting and to start dreaming. How this time, in this great country – where a girl from the South Side of Chicago can go to college and law school, and the son of a single mother from Hawaii can go all the way to the White House – we committed ourselves to building the world as it should be.

So tonight, in honor of my father’s memory and my daughters’ future – out of gratitude to those whose triumphs we mark this week, and those whose everyday sacrifices have brought us to this moment – let us devote ourselves to finishing their work; let us work together to fulfill their hopes; and let us stand together to elect Barack Obama President of the United States of America.

Thank you, God bless you, and God bless America.

Update: Here’s the video of Teddy.

Update: Watching Michelle O now, the speech is much better as delivered than on paper. She’s very fluid, hitting her applause lines, working the crowd.

Update: God, the crowd loves her. TNR was right — they should have had her go up there and let it rip. These people would have gone batsh*t.

Update: Obama video courtesy of MSNBC. Aside from the boss, opinion across the spectrum seems to be that it was a home run.


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Kennedy/Kopechne 2012!

Akzed on August 26, 2008 at 9:38 AM

So Michelle O is redeemed because she managed to read a speech off of a teleprompter after being coached for hours. I don’t think so. I believe that her unrehearsed comments are a better indication of who she is, a hater.

TooTall on August 26, 2008 at 9:57 AM

It sure as hell felt more like the NAACP convention to me.

stldynamite on August 26, 2008 at 10:08 AM

GOP fact-checkers should get busy to see whether there is any truth to Michelle’s rumors about Barack Obama cutting taxes and moving people from welfare to jobs and fighting for veteran’s benefits. Somehow those “communities” that Barack “organized” haven’t changed much.

Michelle Obama also talked a lot about changing “the world as it is” to the “the world as it should be”. Who decides how the world “should” be? Jeremiah Wright and Tony Rezko?
We need some specifics, and some of us might prefer the world as it is.

Steve Z on August 26, 2008 at 10:15 AM

Quoting the boss…

10:39pm Eastern…She’s reading professionally from the teleprompter…but you know, she’s just an ordinary, civilian mom. Just like you.

Well, there is something that she and Barack have in common. Get them off the ‘prompter and she is condescending while he is a blithering idiot. A match made in heaven.

Dr.Cwac.Cwac on August 26, 2008 at 10:35 AM

It seems that Kennedy never has health problems when that trap of his is wide open spewing filth.

I’m proud to say that I hope this man’s tumor kills him soon. I hate this filthbag puke with a passion.

leetpriest on August 26, 2008 at 10:48 AM

I’m sorry. I wasn’t convinced. She’s as ordinary as a white tiger taking a stroll down Broadway. Listening to some of the Democratic pundits, even they thought she didn’t do all that great. The best thing I heard from the Democratics was “at least she didn’t do any harm.

Nuts4koi on August 26, 2008 at 10:48 AM

I’m proud to say that I hope this man’s tumor kills him soon. I hate this filthbag puke with a passion.

leetpriest on August 26, 2008 at 10:48 AM

Comments like that are NOT WELCOME at Hot Air. Think before you post. Our hosts have to answer for what is written here, regardless of the disclaimers on the site.

RushBaby on August 26, 2008 at 10:55 AM

I was completely unimpressed with the Michelle Obama grand reveal last night.

I dub the makeover failed.

http://conservativepolitics.today.com/2008/08/26/michelle-obamas-failed-makeover/

Virginia Shanahan on August 26, 2008 at 11:07 AM

Comments like that are NOT WELCOME at Hot Air. Think before you post. Our hosts have to answer for what is written here, regardless of the disclaimers on the site.

RushBaby on August 26, 2008 at 10:55 AM

Sir, I do not know what you do for a living, but I am a 2 (yes 2) time Iraq Veteran and a Network Engineer.

That drunkard has threatened my life for a total of 2 1/2 years through avenues of withholding funding, harrassing and interrogating my former General Officers in what should have been a debriefing, and in conjunction with Murtha have made it to where I have had to cease fire whilst being directly fired at.

His push on Net Neutrality directly threatens my career that I’ve worked hard to earn, while his push for higher taxes and wealth redistribution bear heavy on my back.

Now, unlike most Americans, I have EARNED my freedom. It was not purchased for me, I paid for it with my own blood, sweat, and tears. I have the right to insist that criminals like Edward Kennedy fall to their own fate.

I don’t want to hear a blanket meaningless statement like “thank you for your service”. The way you can thank me for buying your freedom for you is by letting me vent my anger out at a man that is trying as hard as he can to intentionally kill every service member, and destroy the families and lives of IT professionals.

leetpriest on August 26, 2008 at 11:09 AM

It’s what he did all those years ago, on the streets of Chicago, setting up job training to get people back to work and afterschool programs to keep kids safe – working block by block to help people lift up their families.

It’s what he did in the Illinois Senate, moving people from welfare to jobs, passing tax cuts for hard working families, and making sure women get equal pay for equal work.

I would LOVE to see some actual PROOF of these “accomplishments.”

pullingmyhairout on August 26, 2008 at 11:10 AM

Ted Kenedy should have gone to jail for negligent homicide in the death of Mary Jo Kopechne. He walked past dozens of homes and a fire house with lights on when he left the scene. When he got to his hotel he called Ted Sorenson and an attorney multiple times before calling the authorities to report the accident – several hours after it occured.

He should be ashamed to show his face in public, yet he is one of the most public citizens. This tells you what you need to know about him

The Democrat Party gives this murderer a tribute for his lifetime of trying to destroy the nation. This tells you what you need to know about them.

Akzed on August 26, 2008 at 11:42 AM

If they rolled out Michelle Obama in a Statue of Liberty costume, it would have actually been a dose of subtlety.

Chuck Schick on August 26, 2008 at 12:02 PM

leetpriest on August 26, 2008 at 11:09 AM

Now, unlike most Americans, I have EARNED my freedom.

Were you ever without freedom? Thats a very broad brush you’re painting with. Unless you believe you’re the only veteran who posts or comments on this blog.

It was not purchased for me, I paid for it with my own blood, sweat, and tears. I have the right to insist that criminals like Edward Kennedy fall to their own fate.

No, you don’t. You have a right to voice your opinion. And the right to create your own blog. I recommend you look into that.

I don’t want to hear a blanket meaningless statement like “thank you for your service”. The way you can thank me for buying your freedom for you is by letting me vent my anger out at a man that is trying as hard as he can to intentionally kill every service member, and destroy the families and lives of IT professionals.

The Army of One speaks. You need to do a little recon here before you assume that only you have provided the liberty and freedom we now enjoy. I am more than slightly offended that you presume I owe you anything at all for your military service. To turn this around, you owe me and many others here who served before you were born.

If “Thank you for your service” isn’t enough recompense, maybe the military wasn’t a good choice for you. Neither, it seems, is the IT industry.

BobMbx on August 26, 2008 at 12:28 PM

Leetpriest,

I understand what you say more than I can explain here.

Gentle reminder: There are things one refrains from doing in a host’s domain that one might rightfully do in their own.

texette on August 26, 2008 at 12:36 PM

Did anybody notice how Ted Kennedy ran over the Clintons and then backed over them for good measure?

DfDeportation on August 26, 2008 at 1:03 PM

Were you ever without freedom? Thats a very broad brush you’re painting with. Unless you believe you’re the only veteran who posts or comments on this blog.

Reread my post, I was in the Army. I was without freedom for the entire duration of my service. All of those years I kept my mouth shut and did what I was told so the rest of the country could call me a baby killer when I came home….. I think I have a right to spout out an opinion or two about a traitor that openly aids our enemy.

No, you don’t. You have a right to voice your opinion. And the right to create your own blog. I recommend you look into that.

And voice my opinion, I did. Disagree with the method in which I did so, you did. Your opinion has been duly noted.

The Army of One speaks. You need to do a little recon here before you assume that only you have provided the liberty and freedom we now enjoy. I am more than slightly offended that you presume I owe you anything at all for your military service. To turn this around, you owe me and many others here who served before you were born.

Your condition of taking offense to my statements has been noted. I’m glad that you feel offended about the price of freedom. To my understanding, Iraq is currently rebuilding its populace, and to my personal experience they do not owe their military soldiers and veterans anything. You might find residence in that country slightly more befitting to your needs.

As for your service, I do owe you. If you don’t mind, please state which combat zone you fought in, and what I can do for you to thank you for your service.

Also kindly point out where I stated that I was the only person to have provided freedom and liberty that we now enjoy. Perhaps I missed that statement in my revision. Or perhaps you seek only to provide a straw man fallacy for your argument.

If “Thank you for your service” isn’t enough recompense, maybe the military wasn’t a good choice for you. Neither, it seems, is the IT industry.

I fail to see how you can correlate anything I’ve said to my skill in my career. This failed attempt at a baseless ad hominem attack exposes your true nature.

Leetpriest,

I understand what you say more than I can explain here.

Gentle reminder: There are things one refrains from doing in a host’s domain that one might rightfully do in their own.

texette on August 26, 2008 at 12:36 PM

Perhaps you’re right, Texette. I should have been a bit more eloquent in my language. I also appreciate the approach that you used to assist me in understanding your reasoning.

leetpriest on August 26, 2008 at 1:14 PM

Why is it such a surprise that the “crowd loves her”. You act as if this was unexpected.

jeanie on August 26, 2008 at 1:22 PM

Ted looked puffy and sickly under the make up. I really felt sorry for him since his old bravado and self-assurance was understandably dulled and somewht dis-oriented I thought. Poor man, that’s a terrible end and I hope the fates are easy on him in spite of his weaknesses and past wrongs. As for Michelle? Phony-baloney!! Selling her own true self down the river in return for power–or was it sold for her?

jeanie on August 26, 2008 at 1:32 PM

Strikes me that Cindy McCain won’t be giving a full out biography of herself, her family, and all of this. Why? Because she doesn’t have to. Michelle Obama obviously felt she had something to prove, and gave the speech.

Oh, and apparently Michelle should have edited her speech. You see, if you let your dreams go too far, and you accumulate too much wealth, then that’s not OK anymore…

Seixon on August 26, 2008 at 1:57 PM

Speaking of Thanking Americans for their service…

RushBaby on August 26, 2008 at 2:01 PM

Reread my post, I was in the Army. I was without freedom for the entire duration of my service. All of those years I kept my mouth shut and did what I was told so the rest of the country could call me a baby killer when I came home….. I think I have a right to spout out an opinion or two about a traitor that openly aids our enemy.

Tell us, please, whether you volunteered or were drafted? I suspect you were a volunteer. So the only time, apparently, that you were “without” freedom was during the period of time you volunteered to suspend your freedom. Your complaint about being without freedom and your statement of having earned it by giving it up (to serve in the Army) is not credible. You can’t complain about not having something that you gave away. Or maybe you can. Are you the only one who “gave it away” while serving? Are you the only one who’s been called a baby killer merely for wearing a uniform? Next you’ll be complaining that a bunch of protestors spit on you at the airport when you came home. If all this is true, then suck it up. It’s part of the job. And you knew that before you signed up.

As for your service, I do owe you. If you don’t mind, please state which combat zone you fought in, and what I can do for you to thank you for your service.

Fair enough, good question. I served somewhere under the Atlantic. Never been shot at, never shot at anyone else. And trust me, that’s a good thing. As far as thanking me, its not required nor requested. I served for my own reasons which didn’t include needing to be recognized for my service.

Also kindly point out where I stated that I was the only person to have provided freedom and liberty that we now enjoy. Perhaps I missed that statement in my revision. Or perhaps you seek only to provide a straw man fallacy for your argument.

Ok. Here you go:

The way you can thank me for buying your freedom for you

Why use the word me? Where is the inclusion of your brothers in arms? The ones who stood where you’re standing before you, the ones who stood beside you, and the one’s who’ll stand there after you? You selfish prick. Do they not measure up to the sacrifice you made? Are they lesser and undeserving? What about those that paid the ultimate price? Their sacrifice is priceless compared to yours and mine. Your remarks and attitude dishonor their service more than you realize. You come off sounding like a whiner, who needs a pat on the back. Tell you what, why don’t you write a book about your tours’ in Iraq and see how it stacks up against the other soldier-stories. I guess “Thank you” really isn’t good enough for you. But it should be.

I fail to see how you can correlate anything I’ve said to my skill in my career. This failed attempt at a baseless ad hominem attack exposes your true nature.

Ted Kennedy somehow is destroying the families and lives of IT professionals. You mean all of them? If Uncle Ted has his way, then we won’t have IT pro’s anymore? He must be pyschotic or something. Doesn’t he realize you are an IT pro? And, after having earned your freedom, unlike most others, how dare he do that to you.

Define my true nature. It being exposed and all….

BobMbx on August 26, 2008 at 2:19 PM

I wonder if Cindy McCain will explain the circumstances surrounding her theft of prescription drugs from a charity.

Didn’t she say that she’s an only child? I wonder if she’ll recognize her two siblings.

Why did she say that Mother Theresa convinced her to take two children back to America with her, when Mother Theresa was not there?

Why would she get with a married man?

These are just a few questions that she could answer for the American people.

sandman on August 26, 2008 at 3:32 PM

Define my true nature. It being exposed and all….

Troll. You involved yourself in the conversation with no reason other than to flame.

Ted Kennedy somehow is destroying the families and lives of IT professionals. You mean all of them? If Uncle Ted has his way, then we won’t have IT pro’s anymore?

As an extremely outspoken proponent of Net Neutrality, Uncle Teddy has had his hands in every piece of legislation dealing with the Internet since the Telecomm Act of 96.

Should Net Neutrality be passed, all sites will have equivalent access granted forcibly. Should this occur, there will be no choice but to equalize access to all ports (protocol-based ports, 80 for http, 20 and 21 for ftp, 53 for DNS, etc etc.). When these ports have equal access, bandwidth allocation restrictions will be placed on all ports to ensure equal access. Doing so will diminish VTC, Gaming, and VOIP technologies, as they use protocols that require intermittent spikes in bandwidth. Thus, research and development for these technologies will cease, as it will be literally impossible for these technologies to exist without the bandwidth required.

Net Neutrality also covers the topic of blockage. Neutralizing ports will prevent firewall blocks of commonly known attack ports, such as those included in the ICMP suite.

Long story short:

HALT IN TECHNOLOGY!!!!

And that equals a loss in jobs. Get it now?

As for everything else you said (to include your violation of the ToU by calling me that five letter word that refers to male genitalia), I completely dismiss it as riff-raff from an uppity NCV Seaman who probably pulled his G.I. Bill straight from the pockets of a patriot that lost a limb.

Now, go ahead and have your last word so that we can get back on the topic of Teddy Tequila.

leetpriest on August 26, 2008 at 3:34 PM

Did Kennedy sound like Hitler to anyone else last night when he was up on stage ranting?

Ryan Gandy on August 26, 2008 at 7:18 PM

Under a Democrat administration you will need one of these to live The American Dream

sonnyspats1 on August 26, 2008 at 8:31 PM

Comment pages: 1 6 7 8