“This is not the Big One!”

posted at 4:55 pm on July 29, 2008 by Ed Morrissey

California had a mild-to-moderate earthquake today, centered in a mostly rural area of the high desert, that could be felt as far away as Phoenix. For most Californians, a 5.4 temblor on the Richter scale would give just enough excuse to walk through some evacuation drills and revisit emergency resources. For the media, however, it provides an excuse for breathless reporting and some busy work in the Graphics department.

Here’s Shep Smith and Fox, with helicopters for some reason floating around downtown LA, far away from the actual quake:

Why do they have helicopter shots of downtown LA? Nothing’s happening at all now, and there isn’t any damage there. There isn’t even any damage at the epicenter.

And here’s MS-NBC, giving us the Theme Park Report:

I’m a native Angeleno, and I know what a 5.4 quake means … mostly nothing. If it had occurred on the Whittier-Newport fault or under LA, it might have caused some damage, but this quake’s epicenter was in Chino Hills — at least 60 miles out of LA to the east. What’s in Chino Hills? Mostly dairies and farms, with a smallish bedroom community. At best, we’re talking about making some cows nauseous.

Duane Patterson fills us in from Orange County, where he’s currently taking shelter:

You can tell when it’s a relatively slow news day. A moderate earthquake strikes a remote area of Southern California, and the news channels are going wall to wall as if Katrina struck again. What’s maddening in their quest to find damage anywhere is that out of one side of their mouth, they’re pleading repeatedly with people to stay off their cell phone unless it’s an emergency to keep the cell system from jamming up. But the media’s exaggerated over-coverage of the story is causing people all over the country to jam the cell system with calls to relatives and friends in the “Hot Zone” to make sure they’re all right.

Here is what you need to know. Yes, we all felt it. As the amusement park commercials go, it was a nice 30 second ride – Six Flags – More Flags, More Fun. Yes, we are all fine, thanks for asking. No, nothing broke, unless you happen to live right above where it struck in Chino Hills. For those dairy farmers that inhabit much of Chino Hills, plates might make a fine Christmas gift. Yes, the cows are fine, too.

But hey … without that media deluge, we couldn’t have had Shep call the Chino Hills fire chief a “chill guy”. After that, my stomach’s feeling a little queasy, too.

Update: Apparently it was a 5.4, not a 5.8 … even less notable.

Update II: Maybe the cows enjoy it (h/t Mazztek in the comments):


Related Posts:

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

In Western Washington, we get a earthquake of concern about every 5 years or so. We’re beyond due…

HotAirJosef on July 29, 2008 at 4:58 PM

As a resident of “that smallish bedroom community”, I resemble that remark. And I don’t own a single cow.

Cicero43 on July 29, 2008 at 5:01 PM

I’m a native Angeleno, and I know what a 5.8 quake means … mostly nothing.

Basically.

Think of it like this: this could be China…or Iran.

Or Indonesia/India/Thailand, etc. (remember the Boxing Day Tsunami)?

Or the Midwestern US.

I’m feeling pretty blessed right now.

baldilocks on July 29, 2008 at 5:01 PM

California is due for the “big one” soon…

JetBoy on July 29, 2008 at 5:03 PM

I live in a PHX suburb, & my internet went out for a few minutes cuz of the quake.

jgapinoy on July 29, 2008 at 5:03 PM

Um, actualy these smaller quakes are a GOOD THING.

The pressure needs to be relieved… and its better to have a series of small earthquakes, then for it to store that energy for a big one.

Romeo13 on July 29, 2008 at 5:03 PM

Update: … even less notable.

But is still made Hot Air headlines?

“…”

Lawrence on July 29, 2008 at 5:04 PM

Told! You! So!

Aristotle on July 29, 2008 at 5:05 PM

What’s in Chino Hills? Mostly dairies and farms, with a smallish bedroom community. At best, we’re talking about making some cows nauseous.

That’s irrelevant. The largest recent quake was Loma Prieta, in which the most devastating damage occurred over 50 miles from the epicenter, in Santa Francisco and Oakland, not in the very rural woodland area around Loma Prieta. Chino Hills is less than a mile away for the vast suburban stretch of the Los Angeles metropolitan area (albeit in the “bedroom community” portion thereof). A quake the size of today’s, even centered far away, has the potential to do damage (and to rattle people), but serious damage is unlikely in a place like California, where almost every structure is built to withstand such shakers. The media may have overhyped the quake, but it wasn’t because its location made it automatically harmless.

calbear on July 29, 2008 at 5:07 PM

Lived 48 years in So Cal. Now I’m in the Boston area. Didn’t know the rest of the nation week into such a fit every time the earth shook there.

Fox news dot com has a special “live cam” at the epicenter. It’s currently focused on the windshield and dashboard of their truck.

Exciting stuff

Rod on July 29, 2008 at 5:08 PM

Okay… So Ed has been out of CA for quite a while now. Chino is almost devoid of dairies now, having sold their properties and moved to central CA. Chino and Chino Hills have four High Schools now, of over 3,000kids each and growing. And only 30 miles from downtown LA.

One of my people was 10 miles away from epicenter in her car and she got bounced around pretty well. I’m 20 miles or less away and only pictures on walls went askew.

We have had a lot of new people come into the area in the last decade and I’m SURE they thought this one was big. But Ed’s right…nothing big, some stuff off of grocery shelves and most certainly NOT Katrina like.

I haven’t even felt an aftershock yet….

Now, QUIT calling here! I couldn’t check my grandkids because all you were calling….

originalpechanga on July 29, 2008 at 5:08 PM

JetBoy at 5:03

Soon I’ll have “Oceanfront property in Arizona”.

jgapinoy on July 29, 2008 at 5:08 PM

Why do they have helicopter shots of downtown LA?

Probably hoping to find a car chase.

FloatingRock on July 29, 2008 at 5:08 PM

We’re all good here. The earthquake did spill some of my coffee!

STUPID GAIA (Shakes fist in anger)

Weebork on July 29, 2008 at 5:08 PM

Still pisses me off. Lived most of 52 years in California and have only felt one small earthquake that did no more than rattle the kitchen cabinets and set my lamps to swinging.

Such a disappointment.

Bob's Kid on July 29, 2008 at 5:09 PM

What’s in Chino Hills? Mostly dairies and farms,

I didn’t even feel it.

and no, don’t get in a doorway during a quake. When you see destruction, you don’t see: rubble rubble DOORWAY rubble rubble DOORWAY…

Mazztek on July 29, 2008 at 5:12 PM

Well I lost my margarita pitcher in the quake. So this is a tragic day for me.

Now the Loma Prieta quake? That was some rockin’ and rollin’.

John the Libertarian on July 29, 2008 at 5:12 PM

Told! You! So!

Aristotle on July 29, 2008 at 5:05 PM

Why do you think the faults are in Californication? lol

Oh! You think the faults were there BEFORE the gays swarmed the place?

kirkill on July 29, 2008 at 5:13 PM

I lived in Chino Hills for a year and it is a very nice city to live in. One of the top 20 safest cities to live in the country. They just opened up an upscale outdoor shopping area. The median income is ~120K and its median age is 32. A third of the pop are minors. It’s a vibrant family-oriented city. I’d live there again when rent isn’t so expensive.

It is more city than farms and cows.

Weebork on July 29, 2008 at 5:15 PM

I have to disagree with Ed’s characterization of Chino Hills as “mostly rural area of the high desert”. Saying, “What’s in Chino Hills? Mostly dairies and farms, with a smallish bedroom community” is also inaccurate.

Look, that might have been accurate 10 or so years ago, but Chino Hills has suburbanized prety substantially since then. Yes, the city of Chino is mostly still farms and cows, but Chino Hills is almost entirely residential. Likewise, it isn’t anywhere close to the desert. Just on the other side of those hills (Chino Hills State Park) is the densest part of Orange County, and north of Chino Hills is the Inland Empire, which is composed of the typical LA type sprawl.

Have a look at this google map for yourself. Click on the satelite view button to get a good idea. Zoom on in if you like and you can see the pink tile roofs which are indicative of the new-ish housing style (and fire codes).
Have a look at this map

Nessuno on July 29, 2008 at 5:17 PM

Spose Arnold will call in the National Guard to surround that water leak in the middle of an intersection? I think we need to see the footage of that car driving right through it about 50 to 60 more times.

oakpack on July 29, 2008 at 5:19 PM

Tragedy TV strikes again..

Chakra Hammer on July 29, 2008 at 5:20 PM

Ed: You can’t really judge quake damage by Richter scale alone. How long the shaking occurs and how shallow the fault plays a major part as well. Not to mention the current state of infrastructure.

Going by past experience, this one was could’ve done significant damage had it gone on much longer.

The Ugly American on July 29, 2008 at 5:20 PM

I’m in Orange County – we felt at work, it last a few seconds and then it was all done.

Nothing to get worked up over, at all. The newsworthiness is the MSM overhyping it for yellow journalism’s sake

apollyonbob on July 29, 2008 at 5:20 PM

Oh! You think the faults were there BEFORE the gays swarmed the place?

kirkill on July 29, 2008 at 5:13 PM

It’s like ‘checken or the egg’ paradox.

Aristotle on July 29, 2008 at 5:22 PM

One other thing, was the production of propoganda movies hindered in any way? If W doesn’t come out (sorry) ‘drop’ on schedule, Kos and Huffpo are really going to hear about this.

oakpack on July 29, 2008 at 5:23 PM

Maybe Obama will say that 10,000 people were killed..

a Tragedy in LA an entire city destroyed by an earthquake, 10,000 people died!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CrmkNJxRqLQ

Chakra Hammer on July 29, 2008 at 5:23 PM

So, no cows in Chino Hills?? Darn, I was looking forward to a sudden market glut in milkshakes.

AverageJoe on July 29, 2008 at 5:24 PM

KATRINAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA!

ThePrez on July 29, 2008 at 5:27 PM

“This is not the Big One!”

This quake was much softer than the Sylmar, and Northridge killer (((((shakers))))).

byteshredder on July 29, 2008 at 5:29 PM

The newsworthiness is the MSM overhyping it for yellow journalism’s sake

apollyonbob

blah blah blah, you’re so sophisticated and superior to those lowly reporters. I was in journalism for years. Journalists LIVE for disaster coverage. And if it had been a worse quake, you wouldn’t be so snide about it, you’d be glued to the TV.

John the Libertarian on July 29, 2008 at 5:29 PM

Not surprising, our esteemed mayor VillarMEChA is “on vacation”.

Question is…when is he EVER here?

STG, I can’t wait to vote that clown out of office next year.

The Ugly American on July 29, 2008 at 5:29 PM

Stay tuned folks. FOX is going to have footage of fallen ceiling tiles. So, are the prices of propoganda movies going up world wide?

oakpack on July 29, 2008 at 5:29 PM

Apparently it was a 5.4, not a 5.8 … even less notable.

except to those who dont live in quake, as a nor cal native this is just a baby shaker only people who stress it are tourist ,transplants and media

Mojack420 on July 29, 2008 at 5:32 PM

Oh goody….governor TransFats is mumbling his 2 cents.

Hey look, Ah-nald….I’m eating a Twinkie!!

Mmmmmmm…..

Come ‘n get me coppers!

The Ugly American on July 29, 2008 at 5:33 PM

Global warming strikes again !!!!!
/AlGore=off

Maxx on July 29, 2008 at 5:35 PM

Arnold, “we will destroy the earthquake with the Uzi 9mm”

Chakra Hammer on July 29, 2008 at 5:37 PM

John the Libertarian on July 29, 2008 at 5:29 PM

Listen, defending journalists is like defending lawyers. Your points may be valid, but you’ll find little support :P

And yes, if the quake had been bigger no DOUBT I would be trying to find out more. Because if the quake was bigger, and this is key to what I just said, then it would be newsworthy. What’s your point? :P

apollyonbob on July 29, 2008 at 5:38 PM

Gads, I’m actually embarrassed for Fox News. They’ve been covering it nonstop for the past two hours since it happened; and nothing happened. Maybe somebody should go bulldoze down a building to create something interesting to cover (NBC, if you’re reading this, I’m just kidding! Don’t get any ideas!)

Special K on July 29, 2008 at 5:43 PM

This is the big one! Ya hear that Elizabeth? I’m comin’ to join ya, honey! Mix some champagne and ripple.
- Fred G. Sanford

MB4 on July 29, 2008 at 5:43 PM

Mostly rural area.

No, no, not rural at all. Chino Hills is a community of about 80,000, mostly newer large upscale homes. A typical bedroom community that flows right into several more bedroom communities, making it a densely populated area.

We are about 40 miles from the quakes center and it was quite substantial, although not close to the three big ones I’ve been through out here.

It is a testimony to the earthquake regs put in place after Northridge that there was so little damage, especially in and around Chino and Chino Hills.

Our only damage came after the quake ended and I opened the refrigerator and half the bottles and jars rolled out onto the floor and two broke, making a big mess to clean up.

We also watched a sort of mini tidal wave roll down the length of the pool.

Pal2Pal on July 29, 2008 at 5:44 PM

We are about 40 miles from the quakes center and it was quite substantial, although not close to the three big ones I’ve been through out here.
[...]
Pal2Pal on July 29, 2008 at 5:44 PM

Err, what?

You were 2 miles from the quakes center if you live in Chino Hills. Unles I’m misunderstanding your post?

apollyonbob on July 29, 2008 at 5:46 PM

Oh yeah, and you sure wouldn’t think it rural if you got stuck on the 91 or the 60 or the 10 at the exits leading to Chino Hills during rush hour. Then it is a giant parking lot.

Pal2Pal on July 29, 2008 at 5:47 PM

Still pisses me off. Lived most of 52 years in California and have only felt one small earthquake that did no more than rattle the kitchen cabinets and set my lamps to swinging.

Such a disappointment.

Bob’s Kid on July 29, 2008 at 5:09 PM

Heh. Move to Northern Japan where you can get a nice little 4.0 once a month whether you need one or not.

When I was stationed at Misawa AB (USAF), we Californians would laugh at our fellow Americans who were less used to a moving building than we were.

baldilocks on July 29, 2008 at 5:47 PM

Northern Japan=Northern Honshu

baldilocks on July 29, 2008 at 5:47 PM

No, I live about 40 miles southeast from Chino Hills. My Mother lived in Chino Hills for 29 years until her death a couple of years ago. I know the area very well. Sorry for any misunderstanding.

Pal2Pal on July 29, 2008 at 5:48 PM

Of course, you know this was caused by George W. Bush. He had explosive charges placed deep underground along the San Andreas fault. He wants another chance after the Katrina disaster to prove he is worthy.

To those of you out there, are you resorting to cannibalism yet? You know, they did that out in NOLA because the government didn’t help them.

Special K on July 29, 2008 at 5:52 PM

Ho, hum ….. Wake me up at a 6.5

gstrickler on July 29, 2008 at 5:52 PM

Pal2Pal on July 29, 2008 at 5:48 PM

Oh okay, I getcha. Yeah I work in Tustin, live in Anaheim. Hopefully nothing fell over at my apartment :P

On a random note is uh … anyone else having page formatting issues in IE7?

apollyonbob on July 29, 2008 at 5:54 PM

Just came for the “Coldest Summer in Anchorage” thread where I set them straight. This earthquake is also caused by Global Warming.

You fools! You’ve all missed the real story here. Global Warming! It’s so obvious! As the earth warms up the glue begins to melt until it literally falls apart and we’re all left clinging to tiny pieces of earth drifting on a hot ocean like cockroaches floating on pieces of a global jigsaw puzzle dumped into a steaming bowl of bouillabaisse.

Wake up before you’re stuck eating fish for the rest of you life!

Rod on July 29, 2008 at 6:01 PM

This big one huh. Who wants to do bets on the next “Big One”.

I was in the Washington one in 2001. That one scared me to actually run outside.

Then up here with the 8.9. pfft at a 5.4, whoopty doo.

HotAirJosef on July 29, 2008 at 4:58 PM

Did you feel that big one in WA in 2001?

upinak on July 29, 2008 at 6:06 PM

Rod on July 29, 2008 at 6:01 PM

Rod are you in Anchorage right now? or am I reading this wrong?

upinak on July 29, 2008 at 6:07 PM

So, I was sitting and watching Hellboy II and considering whether I could be better spending my time, when the whole theatre starts to shake. “Ooh! Sensurround!”, I think, as I’m watching Hellboy fight some giant plant creature. “No. Earthquake. Should be over in a second. Man, this movie sucks. Any second now… ah, yes. It’s over.”

There’s nothing like a potentially life-threatening event to help you adjust your priorities tout suite. I left shortly after that.

Let me guess… Hellboy won.

MikeZero on July 29, 2008 at 6:18 PM

Rod are you in Anchorage right now? or am I reading this wrong?
upinak on July 29, 2008 at 6:07 PM

No. I wrote it wrong. Sorry. The thread is Climate Change and Minorities. The cool Anchorage summer was within it and provided below.

Coldest summer, ever, in Anchorage.

Entelechy on July 29, 2008 at 4:15 PM

Rod on July 29, 2008 at 6:19 PM

I lived in Victorville for a couple of years. The first week or so that I was there I awoke in my water-bed to the sound of windows rattling all through the house from what I found out later was a 5.7 earthquake. I didn’t feel anything until I got out of the bed. As soon as I touched the floor I knew what it was and made the mad dash through the house snatching kids out of their beds and going outside. There was another couple outside and I said “Holy **** was that an earthquake? They said “Pffft. That was nothing. Welcome to California”.

Guardian on July 29, 2008 at 6:19 PM

5.4 is enough to damage already weakened structures and, in fact, some old masonry fell in downtown. Also, it really depends on the kind of soil you’re sitting on: bedrock is no problem. Loose, sandy soil on the other hand … watch out.

This should however serve as a reminder to people to check their emergency food and other supplies. A quake like this can always be a foreshock to a larger shake, not the main act itself.

irishspy on July 29, 2008 at 6:37 PM

I live in San Bernardino about 20 miles away from the epicenter. The windows rattled and there was one jolt. It was only a 5 pointer. YAWN!

Captain Weenie on July 29, 2008 at 6:44 PM

Rod on July 29, 2008 at 6:19 PM

Oh gotcha. But that is ok, I am “Living” the Anchorage summer. it isn’t cold more like rainy, but it was like this in the early 80′s… yawn.

upinak on July 29, 2008 at 7:04 PM

Shaken cows = Instant butter. Mmmmmmm… Butter.

Frozen Tex on July 29, 2008 at 7:06 PM

Shaken cows = Instant butter. Mmmmmmm… Butter.
Frozen Tex on July 29, 2008 at 7:06 PM

If you shake a brown cow, do you get a chocolate mild shake?

upinak on July 29, 2008 at 7:12 PM

that guy who puts his earthquake predictions on live leak called for a 5-5.5 quake E of LA this month.

he’s calling for something a tad stronger in the Bay area later this month.

he might be on to something. he was very accurate on a prediction last Fall as well.

DrW on July 29, 2008 at 7:14 PM

Um, actualy these smaller quakes are a GOOD THING.
The pressure needs to be relieved… and its better to have a series of small earthquakes, then for it to store that energy for a big one.
Romeo13 on July 29, 2008 at 5:03 PM

Whoa, hold on there! Big earthquakes can strike at any time, regardless of how many smaller ones take place.

http://earthquake.usgs.gov/learning/faq.php?categoryID=6&faqID=110

fiatboomer on July 29, 2008 at 7:16 PM

upinak on July 29, 2008 at 7:12 PM

That’s exactly how they do it.

And, if you shake the cow while feeding it bacteria, you get cheese.

Frozen Tex on July 29, 2008 at 7:17 PM

Now the Loma Prieta quake? That was some rockin’ and rollin’.
John the Libertarian on July 29, 2008 at 5:12 PM

Yep, I was at an intersection in the Clayton/Concord area on my way home from work when it hit and my car was a rockin…but not in a good way if you know what I mean.

Still pisses me off. Lived most of 52 years in California and have only felt one small earthquake that did no more than rattle the kitchen cabinets and set my lamps to swinging.

Such a disappointment.
Bob’s Kid on July 29, 2008 at 5:09 PM

Having grown up in Northern California I can tell you that being in an earthquake is a bit of a thrill at first that thrill quickly goes away when it becomes obvious it’s a “big one” and it seems to last forever and you can actually see the ground rippling just like when a stone is thrown into water…then it quickly goes from thrilling to major pucker factor!

It reminds me of the sign I had on my race car trailer that read…”first comes no fear…then comes oh Shiite!”

Liberty or Death on July 29, 2008 at 7:18 PM

Cheese = 7.9
Cows = 8.7
Shep Smith = 1.4

whitetop on July 29, 2008 at 7:21 PM

If you shake a brown cow, do you get a chocolate mild shake?

upinak on July 29, 2008 at 7:12 PM

A better question is his. If you cause a dairy to laugh, will milk come out of its nose?

RobertInAustin on July 29, 2008 at 7:22 PM

“A better question is This.”

I’m an idiot.

RobertInAustin on July 29, 2008 at 7:23 PM

It was a fun ride. I work about 20 miles from the epicenter, live even closer. Wonder if some stuff in my house will be in disarray when I get home. Always worry about the china cabinet when things start shaking.

Snidely Whiplash on July 29, 2008 at 7:24 PM

It reminds me of the sign I had on my race car trailer that read…”first comes no fear…then comes oh Shiite!”
Liberty or Death on July 29, 2008 at 7:18 PM

I have been in the 2 2003 here in Alaska, the 1 in WA in 2001, the 1 in Alaska in 1989 and I think one more, but forgot the year. All about 7.5. Pucker effect stops after 6.9 I think and you just hold on for dear life.

I have also been in 7 volcanos explosions (6 if living in WY when Mt St Helens erupted doesn’t count). Now THOSE are scarey!

upinak on July 29, 2008 at 7:27 PM

and one more, in reference to the 7.9-magnitude Fort Tejon earthquake:

“Accounts of the 1857 earthquake indicate that several shocks indicate that several small to moderate size California shocks preceded it by 1 to 9 hours. In particular, two foreshocks were widely felt. A study of felt areas and intensities of these two foreshocks by Professor Kerry Sieh of the California Institute of Technology indicates they were similar to the Parkfield main shocks of 1901, 1922, 1934, and 1966. Sieh concluded that the 1857 foreshocks were magnitude 5 to 6 earthquakes located within an area that includes the Parkfield section….”

fiatboomer on July 29, 2008 at 7:28 PM

That’s one less earthquake I gotta deal with since I left LA in 2002. The hell with that town.

Coronagold on July 29, 2008 at 7:50 PM

calbear on July 29, 2008 at 5:07 PM

Of course the location of an earthquake is relevant! It depends upon the fault. This earthquake struck on the Chino fault. If it was on the San Andreas fault, the Newport-Inglewood fault, the Santa Monica fault, or the Hollywood fault, then there would be more cause for concern (especially on the San Andreas.) Most buildings in the Chino Hills area are below five-stories high, and those that are near that height are new and not unreinforced masonry, which is the most dangerous type of building to be in or near during an earthquake.

There should always be due cause for concern, but not “zomfg its the big one run for your lives AHHHHH!!!1111″

MB007 on July 29, 2008 at 8:06 PM

There’s a 1 in 20 chance that this is a foreshock. I haven’t felt ANY of the smaller shocks…. . hmmm…

originalpechanga on July 29, 2008 at 8:26 PM

I’m about 20 miles from ground zero, and this was a fun one. 30 or so seconds of rolling back and forth, no damage.

peski on July 29, 2008 at 8:27 PM

They were due…sorta….

johnnyU on July 29, 2008 at 8:47 PM

Mmmm Mmmm.. I just moved my son out of LA a few weeks ago, due at least in part, some intuition that said the “big one” is imminent. I know this wasn’t it, but I’m mighty glad he’s here in Vegas with me now.

Fishoutofwater on July 29, 2008 at 9:17 PM

Ed, thanks for the CA cow commercial. They are some of the most creative and always make me laugh.

YankeeinCA on July 29, 2008 at 9:33 PM

In breaking news, nothing happening, nothing to see here, move along, move along.

- The Cat

MirCat on July 29, 2008 at 9:47 PM

I was about 5 miles from the epicenter, though, and it felt bad. Real bad.

PattyJ on July 29, 2008 at 9:48 PM

Oh gotcha. But that is ok, I am “Living” the Anchorage summer. it isn’t cold more like rainy, but it was like this in the early 80’s… yawn.
upinak on July 29, 2008 at 7:04 PM

I envy you, Upinka. Anchorage and all of Alaska is beautiful. I even love the winters up there. Spent one in Anchorage and one in Fairbanks courtesy of the Army.

Question: is “Upinak” a native name? It looks “Alaskan”

Rod on July 29, 2008 at 9:50 PM

John and Ken, KFI 640, LA, had the best line on the coverage of this earthquake

“We wonder how the actors and other personalities did. Is Paris Hilton ok?”

Entelechy on July 29, 2008 at 9:52 PM

California had a mild-to-moderate earthquake today, centered in a mostly rural area of the high desert

Better check a map. The high desert is on the other side of the mountains.

Blackhawk45 on July 29, 2008 at 9:55 PM

Remember. If it “bleeds,” it leads. ‘Nuf said.

Wildcatter1980 on July 30, 2008 at 10:33 AM

Question: is “Upinak” a native name? It looks “Alaskan”
Rod on July 29, 2008 at 9:50 PM

Rod, look at my name. up in ak. Nothing native about it.. hehe :)

upinak on July 30, 2008 at 12:51 PM