Charles Krauthammer wrote last week about the enormous arrogance of Barack Obama, but even Krauthammer couldn’t imagine that the Obamas would claim to rescue all of the world’s children through their election.  Michelle Obama appeared in Colorado last week, the same time as Krauthammer wrote his column, and told the audience that she didn’t have time to get angry — but she wishes she did.  Why?  Well, let her tell you:

“We have one candidate who essentially is telling us every day that the world as it is just fine. That what we’ve been doing for the last eight years is fine,” Obama said. “Stay the course. Don’t make too many changes.

“And then we have this other candidate — Barack Obama — who is saying every day that the world as it is not right. It’s not good enough,” she said. …

“I wish we had time to be divided. I wish we had time to be upset. To be angry. To be disappointed. I wish we did,” Obama said. “Because if we had time for that, then things wouldn’t be so bad right now. Instead, we’re in a place where another four or eight years of the world as it is will devastate the life of some child.”

Which child is that?  And only one child? This is the kind of rhetoric that the Left loves to use, claiming that if just one person in the world is unhappy, then everything we do is wrong and entire systems have to be recreated to address it.  It’s Utopianism, an impulse that has led to the devastation of millions of lives, not just one.  The message intends to show the Obamas as more caring than John McCain, vapid enough without the silliness of arguing that McCain doesn’t want to change anything at all.

So now we can add “save the children” to the other Obama campaign promises, like “heal the oceans” that more than just hint at arrogance.  And it isn’t just conservatives noticing that stench of hubris, either.  Joan Venocchi, no conservative apologist, vented her spleen over the egotistical self-centeredness of Obama in Sunday’s Boston Globe:

Barack Obama always was a larger-than-life candidate with a healthy ego. Now he’s turning into the A-Rod of politics. It’s all about him.

He’s giving his opponent something other than issues to attack him on: narcissism.

A convention hall isn’t good enough for the presumptive Democratic nominee. He plans to deliver his acceptance speech in the 75,000 seat stadium where the Denver Broncos play. Before a vote is cast, he’s embarking on a foreign policy tour that will use cheering Europeans – and America’s top news anchors – as extras in his campaign. What do you expect from a candidate who already auditioned a quasi-presidential seal with the Latin inscription, “Vero possumus” – “Yes, we can”?

Pundits used to call Bill Clinton The Big Me, but Obama has begun to make Bill look positively humble in comparison.  One wonders when Obama will begin wearing a red cape on the dais.  (image courtesy Jessica’s Well)