Open thread: Montana and South Dakota; Update: Hillary doesn’t really want VP spot? Update: CNN, NBC say Obama clinches; Update: Hillary seeking meeting with Obama? Update: No decisions tonight, says Hillary

posted at 8:32 pm on June 3, 2008 by Allahpundit

Face it, you’re sad. I’m sad too.

I compared her before to King Kong near the end. No need to hold the tears back. ‘Twas Clenis killed the beast.

Update: Vote GOP, ladies!

Senator Clinton has earned great respect for her tenacity and courage. The media often overlooked how compassionately she spoke to the concerns and dreams of millions of Americans, and she deserves a lot more appreciation than she sometimes received. As the father of three daughters, I owe her a debt for inspiring millions of women to believe there is no opportunity in this great country beyond their reach. I am proud to call her my friend. Pundits and party elders have declared that Senator Obama will be my opponent. He will be a formidable o ne. But I’m ready for the challenge, and determined to run this race in a way that does credit to our campaign and to the proud, decent and patriotic people I ask to lead.

Update: Serious question re: the vice presidency. If she was interested in that, why didn’t she press for it last month? Her leverage now is near zero, with some fundraisers already ready to abandon ship and others doubtless soon to follow after he’s declared the presumptive nominee. All she can offer him at this point is the promise not to throw up roadblocks in his way to the convention after he’s already begun the general campaign, but she’s not going to do that anyway for fear of jeopardizing her goodwill in 2012 (or 2016). She’s got no cards left to play. What now?

Update: Needless to say, expect something in the way of a victory speech from Obama tonight.

Update: Dude, McCain/Clinton. It’s time. Especially if the alternative is McCain/Huckabee.

Update: A fait accompli: CNN and NBC finally join the AP in reporting that Barry O’s clinched enough delegates to win the Democratic nomination. Congrats to Democrats for nominating the first major-party black candidate in American history.

Update: Will the big tete-a-tete come tomorrow?

Update: She’s rocking on, at least until tomorrow. I wonder why.


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‘Twas Clenis killed the beast.

So true. So ironic also as this race, and her term(s) were to cement his legacy since they will probably be eclipsed by the war years. Well done, Bill.

Spirit of 1776 on June 3, 2008 at 8:40 PM

Big question: will she actually and explicitly concede and withdraw before the convention? I don’t think so. I think she will expect to see more stumbles and keep the lights on in case the Democrats drop by in the eleventh hour.

It ain’t over until the first ballot in Denver, and I can’t see a Clinton quitting until it’s really, really over.

Ed Morrissey on June 3, 2008 at 8:43 PM

Reference update:

Gonna be a great quote on a DNC Obama/Hillary ad.

Limerick on June 3, 2008 at 8:43 PM

I guess I’m a little sad, as I’ve grown to actually admire Clinton over the past few months. But I’m sure it will soon wear off and be replaced by the awesomely awesomess that is the Clinton’s destruction at the hands of their own party.

BadgerHawk on June 3, 2008 at 8:45 PM

She’s got no cards left to play.

Except the fact he’ll have to do quite a bit to win over her supporters.

amerpundit on June 3, 2008 at 8:46 PM

Is it possible John McCain is the most under whelming speaker to ever get the Republican nomination? I am watching him now and the crowd must be on life support.

Why is he whispering?

EJDolbow on June 3, 2008 at 8:51 PM

Well, as Kilgore mused, “Some day this war’s gonna end.” And now it’s seeming to.

ForNow on June 3, 2008 at 8:52 PM

Big question: will she actually and explicitly concede and withdraw before the convention? I don’t think so. I think she will expect to see more stumbles and keep the lights on in case the Democrats drop by in the eleventh hour.

It ain’t over until the first ballot in Denver, and I can’t see a Clinton quitting until it’s really, really over.

Ed Morrissey on June 3, 2008 at 8:43 PM

Not a chance; she has $20-some million in debt to retire.

steveegg on June 3, 2008 at 8:52 PM

No live chat :(

p0s3r on June 3, 2008 at 8:53 PM

It ain’t over until the first ballot in Denver, and I can’t see a Clinton quitting until it’s really, really over.

Ed Morrissey on June 3, 2008 at 8:43 PM

True, but I could see a Clinton dropping out in exchange for having the reported $20 million in campaign debt paid off.

Hollowpoint on June 3, 2008 at 8:55 PM

It ain’t over until the first ballot in Denver, and I can’t see a Clinton quitting until it’s really, really over.

Ed Morrissey on June 3, 2008 at 8:43 PM

I think that is absolutely correct, and it is exactly what I would expect from her, even in the face of financial ruin.

Weight of Glory on June 3, 2008 at 8:56 PM

Ed Morrissey on June 3, 2008 at 8:43 PM

Unless Barry explicitly offers her the Veepship, she will not leave the stage until the convention is over.

Buy Danish on June 3, 2008 at 8:57 PM

Update: Dude, McCain/Clinton. It’s time. Especially if the alternative is McCain/Huckabee.

Don’t give him or the “R”NC any dumb ideas.

steveegg on June 3, 2008 at 8:59 PM

He just clinched the nomination.

Typhonsentra on June 3, 2008 at 9:01 PM

CNN just broke away from McCain’s speech to give the nomination to Obama, but I don’t think anybody noticed because they were all asleep.

Mark1971 on June 3, 2008 at 9:04 PM

NBC: Obama Clinches.

amerpundit on June 3, 2008 at 9:05 PM

The question now is, how soon will the window of opportunity remain open for mainstream airing, validation, and traction-gain for criticism of Obama? — and likewise for criticism of the mainstream press itself? Now is the time to remind disappointed Democrats of what they’ve noticed about the MSM when it takes sides against their favorite.

ForNow on June 3, 2008 at 9:05 PM

OT: Is anyone watching McCain right now? He is right now pointing to Campaign Finance reform as a success, a good thing, bipartisan, and evidence that he (McCain) has delivered on real change…sigh.

Weight of Glory on June 3, 2008 at 9:06 PM

He just clinched the nomination.

Typhonsentra on June 3, 2008 at 9:01 PM

No he did not.

The press and Obama are going to pound that into your head but he has not. The Super Delegates can change their minds every hour on the hour until the moment of the fist ballot in Denver.

EJDolbow on June 3, 2008 at 9:06 PM

Sorry, I meant how long will the window of opportunity remain open for etc.

ForNow on June 3, 2008 at 9:06 PM

“My friends *Smiles* That’s not change you can believe in!”

Am I going crazy or has he used this applause line several times now?

Typhonsentra on June 3, 2008 at 9:06 PM

It ain’t over until the first ballot in Denver, and I can’t see a Clinton quitting until it’s really, really over.

Ed Morrissey on June 3, 2008 at 8:43 PM

Awwww, C’Mon…

Take a few minutes out of this serious life and sing along!

Sing! Sing! Sing!

And enjoy yourselves for a change!

http://community.hallmarkchannel.com/kickapps/_Ding-Dong-the-witch-is-dead/video/169215/2827.html

Saltysam on June 3, 2008 at 9:06 PM

Weight of Glory on June 3, 2008 at 9:06 PM

He ain’t looking for your vote. He wants the disgruntled HillaryGals.

EJDolbow on June 3, 2008 at 9:06 PM

Weight of Glory on June 3, 2008 at 9:06 PM

Yeah I’m listening, between trips to the fridge.

Limerick on June 3, 2008 at 9:07 PM

Hill just won SD.

Weight of Glory on June 3, 2008 at 9:08 PM

Yeah I’m listening, between trips to the fridge.

Limerick on June 3, 2008 at 9:07 PM

You didn’t miss much.

Weight of Glory on June 3, 2008 at 9:09 PM

McCain did NOT time this speech well. He was getting free air time while there was no news to report, but as soon as SD polls closed, every network but Fox immediately dropped coverage. How hard would it have been to bump his schedule up 15 minutes?

What is it, amateur hour on McCain’s staff?

e-pirate on June 3, 2008 at 9:10 PM

What’s with the campaign music?

Should be Ride of the Valkyries.

‘I love the smell of napalm in the morning’

Limerick on June 3, 2008 at 9:10 PM

He ain’t looking for your vote. He wants the disgruntled HillaryGals.

EJDolbow on June 3, 2008 at 9:06 PM

Yeah I know, you’re right. I guess I still have some residual feelings that my party’s candidate would at least sound like me on first amendment issues.

Weight of Glory on June 3, 2008 at 9:11 PM

Mike Allen from Politico, speaking on C-SPAN just called McCain’s speech “a little mean” and said Obama’s speech is likely to be “uplifting.”

And so it begins. Gonna be a loooong five months, folks.

Slublog on June 3, 2008 at 9:12 PM

e-pirate on June 3, 2008 at 9:10 PM

Funny you should say that, Brit pointed out the same thing and Wallace began making excuses for how badly the speech was delivered.

Weight of Glory on June 3, 2008 at 9:12 PM

No he did not.

The press and Obama are going to pound that into your head but he has not. The Super Delegates can change their minds every hour on the hour until the moment of the fist ballot in Denver.

EJDolbow on June 3, 2008 at 9:06 PM

You’re seventeen different kinds of crazy if you think some superdelegate will be dumb enough to uncommitt and therefore “un-nominate” the presumptive nominee.

e-pirate on June 3, 2008 at 9:13 PM

Mike Allen from Politico, speaking on C-SPAN just called McCain’s speech “a little mean” and said Obama’s speech is likely to be “uplifting.”

And so it begins. Gonna be a loooong five months, folks.

Slublog on June 3, 2008 at 9:12 PM

Boy, that was quick.

Weight of Glory on June 3, 2008 at 9:13 PM

The last election day and Hillary is still winning states by double digits. That’s something.

SoulGlo on June 3, 2008 at 9:14 PM

Obama is still about 300 delegates short of the (current) magic number. He doesn’t have a single super delegate (neither does Hillary of course). I hope someone from the Clinton campaign points this out to CNN, because they’re really pissing me off.

infidel65 on June 3, 2008 at 9:15 PM

Update: A fait accompli: CNN and NBC finally join the AP in reporting that Barry O’s clinched enough delegates to win the Democratic nomination. Congrats to Democrats for nominating the first major-party black candidate in American history.

It was perfectly timed by the official house organs of the DNC. I’m surprised AP broke the embargo though.

steveegg on June 3, 2008 at 9:16 PM

ABC & CBS join in the clinch prediction.

amerpundit on June 3, 2008 at 9:16 PM

How is Tim Russert allowed to be on TV? You’d think if somebody was that stupid, they’d only be on tv because they’re very good looking. Russert, on the other hand, looks like his face was on a fire and somebody decided to put it out by beating it with the ugly stick.

e-pirate on June 3, 2008 at 9:16 PM

Needless to say, expect something in the way of a victory speech from Obama tonight.

Tonight, after fifty-four hard-fought contests, our primary season has finally come to an end.

Sixteen months have passed since we first stood together on the steps of the Old State Capitol in Springfield, Illinois. Thousands of miles have been traveled. Millions of voices have been heard. And because of what you said — because you decided that change must come to Washington; because you believed that this year must be different than all the rest; because you chose to listen not to your doubts or your fears but to your greatest hopes and highest aspirations, tonight we mark the end of one historic journey with the beginning of another — a journey that will bring a new and better day to America. Tonight, I can stand before you and say that I will be the Democratic nominee for President of the United States.

I want to thank every American who stood with us over the course of this campaign — through the good days and the bad; from the snows of Cedar Rapids to the sunshine of Sioux Falls. And tonight I also want to thank the men and woman who took this journey with me as fellow candidates for President.

At this defining moment for our nation, we should be proud that our party put forth one of the most talented, qualified field of individuals ever to run for this office. I have not just competed with them as rivals, I have learned from them as friends, as public servants, and as patriots who love America and are willing to work tirelessly to make this country better. They are leaders of this party, and leaders that America will turn to for years to come.

That is particularly true for the candidate who has traveled further on this journey than anyone else. Senator Hillary Clinton has made history in this campaign not just because she’s a woman who has done what no woman has done before, but because she’s a leader who inspires millions of Americans with her strength, her courage, and her commitment to the causes that brought us here tonight.

We’ve certainly had our differences over the last sixteen months. But as someone who’s shared a stage with her many times, I can tell you that what gets Hillary Clinton up in the morning — even in the face of tough odds — is exactly what sent her and Bill Clinton to sign up for their first campaign in Texas all those years ago; what sent her to work at the Children’s Defense Fund and made her fight for health care as First Lady; what led her to the United States Senate and fueled her barrier-breaking campaign for the presidency — an unyielding desire to improve the lives of ordinary Americans, no matter how difficult the fight may be. And you can rest assured that when we finally win the battle for universal health care in this country, she will be central to that victory. When we transform our energy policy and lift our children out of poverty, it will be because she worked to help make it happen. Our party and our country are better off because of her, and I am a better candidate for having had the honor to compete with Hillary Rodham Clinton.

There are those who say that this primary has somehow left us weaker and more divided. Well I say that because of this primary, there are millions of Americans who have cast their ballot for the very first time. There are Independents and Republicans who understand that this election isn’t just about the party in charge of Washington, it’s about the need to change Washington.Ê There are young people, and African-Americans, and Latinos, and women of all ages who have voted in numbers that have broken records and inspired a nation.

All of you chose to support a candidate you believe in deeply. But at the end of the day, we aren’t the reason you came out and waited in lines that stretched block after block to make your voice heard. You didn’t do that because of me or Senator Clinton or anyone else. You did it because you know in your hearts that at this moment — a moment that will define a generation — we cannot afford to keep doing what we’ve been doing. We owe our children a better future. We owe our country a better future. And for all those who dream of that future tonight, I say — let us begin the work together. Let us unite in common effort to chart a new course for America.

In just a few short months, the Republican Party will arrive in St. Paul with a very different agenda. They will come here to nominate John McCain, a man who has served this country heroically. I honor that service, and I respect his many accomplishments, even if he chooses to deny mine. My differences with him are not personal; they are with the policies he has proposed in this campaign.

Because while John McCain can legitimately tout moments of independence from his party in the past, such independence has not been the hallmark of his presidential campaign.

It’s not change when John McCain decided to stand with George Bush ninety-five percent of the time, as he did in the Senate last year.

It’s not change when he offers four more years of Bush economic policies that have failed to create well-paying jobs, or insure our workers, or help Americans afford the skyrocketing cost of college — policies that have lowered the real incomes of the average American family, widened the gap between Wall Street and Main Street, and left our children with a mountain of debt.

And it’s not change when he promises to continue a policy in Iraq that asks everything of our brave men and women in uniform and nothing of Iraqi politicians — a policy where all we look for are reasons to stay in Iraq, while we spend billions of dollars a month on a war that isn’t making the American people any safer.

So I’ll say this — there are many words to describe John McCain’s attempt to pass off his embrace of George Bush’s policies as bipartisan and new. But change is not one of them.

Change is a foreign policy that doesn’t begin and end with a war that should’ve never been authorized and never been waged. I won’t stand here and pretend that there are many good options left in Iraq, but what’s not an option is leaving our troops in that country for the next hundred years — especially at a time when our military is overstretched, our nation is isolated, and nearly every other threat to America is being ignored.

We must be as careful getting out of Iraq as we were careless getting in – but start leaving we must. It’s time for Iraqis to take responsibility for their future. It’s time to rebuild our military and give our veterans the care they need and the benefits they deserve when they come home. It’s time to refocus our efforts on al Qaeda’s leadership and Afghanistan, and rally the world against the common threats of the 21st century — terrorism and nuclear weapons; climate change and poverty; genocide and disease. That’s what change is.

Change is realizing that meeting today’s threats requires not just our firepower, but the power of our diplomacy — tough, direct diplomacy where the President of the United States isn’t afraid to let any petty dictator know where America stands and what we stand for. We must once again have the courage and conviction to lead the free world. That is the legacy of Roosevelt, and Truman, and Kennedy. That’s what the American people want. That’s what change is.

Change is building an economy that rewards not just wealth, but the work and workers who created it. It’s understanding that the struggles facing working families can’t be solved by spending billions of dollars on more tax breaks for big corporations and wealthy CEOs, but by giving a the middle-class a tax break, and investing in our crumbling infrastructure, and transforming how we use energy, and improving our schools, and renewing our commitment to science and innovation. It’s understanding that fiscal responsibility and shared prosperity can go hand-in-hand, as they did when Bill Clinton was President.

John McCain has spent a lot of time talking about trips to Iraq in the last few weeks, but maybe if he spent some time taking trips to the cities and towns that have been hardest hit by this economy — cities in Michigan, and Ohio, and right here in Minnesota — he’d understand the kind of change that people are looking for.

Maybe if he went to Iowa and met the student who works the night shift after a full day of class and still can’t pay the medical bills for a sister who’s ill, he’d understand that she can’t afford four more years of a health care plan that only takes care of the healthy and wealthy. She needs us to pass health care plan that guarantees insurance to every American who wants it and brings down premiums for every family who needs it. That’s the change we need.

Maybe if he went to Pennsylvania and met the man who lost his job but can’t even afford the gas to drive around and look for a new one, he’d understand that we can’t afford four more years of our addiction to oil from dictators. That man needs us to pass an energy policy that works with automakers to raise fuel standards, and makes corporations pay for their pollution, and oil companies invest their record profits in a clean energy future — an energy policy that will create millions of new jobs that pay well and can’t be outsourced. That’s the change we need.

And maybe if he spent some time in the schools of South Carolina or St. Paul or where he spoke tonight in New Orleans, he’d understand that we can’t afford to leave the money behind for No Child Left Behind; that we owe it to our children to invest in early childhood education; to recruit an army of new teachers and give them better pay and more support; to finally decide that in this global economy, the chance to get a college education should not be a privilege for the wealthy few, but the birthright of every American. That’s the change we need in America. That’s why I’m running for President.

The other side will come here in September and offer a very different set of policies and positions, and that is a debate I look forward to. It is a debate the American people deserve. But what you don’t deserve is another election that’s governed by fear, and innuendo, and division. What you won’t hear from this campaign or this party is the kind of politics that uses religion as a wedge, and patriotism as a bludgeon — that sees our opponents not as competitors to challenge, but enemies to demonize. Because we may call ourselves Democrats and Republicans, but we are Americans first. We are always Americans first.

Despite what the good Senator from Arizona said tonight, I have seen people of differing views and opinions find common cause many times during my two decades in public life, and I have brought many together myself. I’ve walked arm-in-arm with community leaders on the South Side of Chicago and watched tensions fade as black, white, and Latino fought together for good jobs and good schools. I’ve sat across the table from law enforcement and civil rights advocates to reform a criminal justice system that sent thirteen innocent people to death row. And I’ve worked with friends in the other party to provide more children with health insurance and more working families with a tax break; to curb the spread of nuclear weapons and ensure that the American people know where their tax dollars are being spent; and to reduce the influence of lobbyists who have all too often set the agenda in Washington.

In our country, I have found that this cooperation happens not because we agree on everything, but because behind all the labels and false divisions and categories that define us; beyond all the petty bickering and point-scoring in Washington, Americans are a decent, generous, compassionate people, united by common challenges and common hopes. And every so often, there are moments which call on that fundamental goodness to make this country great again.

So it was for that band of patriots who declared in a Philadelphia hall the formation of a more perfect union; and for all those who gave on the fields of Gettysburg and Antietam their last full measure of devotion to save that same union.

So it was for the Greatest Generation that conquered fear itself, and liberated a continent from tyranny, and made this country home to untold opportunity and prosperity.

So it was for the workers who stood out on the picket lines; the women who shattered glass ceilings; the children who braved a Selma bridge for freedom’s cause.

So it has been for every generation that faced down the greatest challenges and the most improbable odds to leave their children a world that’s better, and kinder, and more just.

And so it must be for us.

America, this is our moment. This is our time. Our time to turn the page on the policies of the past. Our time to bring new energy and new ideas to the challenges we face. Our time to offer a new direction for the country we love.

The journey will be difficult. The road will be long. I face this challenge with profound humility, and knowledge of my own limitations. But I also face it with limitless faith in the capacity of the American people. Because if we are willing to work for it, and fight for it, and believe in it, then I am absolutely certain that generations from now, we will be able to look back and tell our children that this was the moment when we began to provide care for the sick and good jobs to the jobless; this was the moment when the rise of the oceans began to slow and our planet began to heal; this was the moment when we ended a war and secured our nation and restored our image as the last, best hope on Earth. This was the moment — this was the time — when we came together to remake this great nation so that it may always reflect our very best selves, and our highest ideals. Thank you, God Bless you, and may God Bless the United States of America.

Holmes on June 3, 2008 at 9:18 PM

Still not sold on McCain… But not like there are any choices left… Slim pickings… I am on my 5th pair of nose plugs…

And he doesn’t get any style points for delivery… But for contents… I have to him him Blazin Saddles – Harvey Korman props…

Y314K on June 3, 2008 at 9:18 PM

Update: Dude, McCain/Clinton. It’s time. Especially if the alternative is McCain/Huckabee.

Boy are you gonna catch some flack for that.

VolMagic on June 3, 2008 at 9:18 PM

“Congrats to Democrats for nominating the first major-party black candidate in American history.”

“Congrats to Democrats for nominating the first major-party black-looking, bi-racial candidate in American history.”

Michael in MI on June 3, 2008 at 9:19 PM

You’re seventeen different kinds of crazy if you think some superdelegate will be dumb enough to uncommitt and therefore “un-nominate” the presumptive nominee.

e-pirate on June 3, 2008 at 9:13 PM

Some already have.

Two months is a lifetime in Presidential politics and a lot can happen. If Obama does something that will ensure a dem loss in Novemeber some Supers will abandon ship if Hillary is still in the running.

EJDolbow on June 3, 2008 at 9:20 PM

John McCain has spent a lot of time talking about trips to Iraq in the last few weeks, but maybe if he spent some time taking trips to the cities and towns that have been hardest hit by this economy — cities in Michigan, and Ohio, and right here in Minnesota — he’d understand the kind of change that people are looking for.

WTF is he talking about? He’s talking about two entirely different issues: national security and economy. You can’t understand the problems we face in national security by visiting Michigan.

amerpundit on June 3, 2008 at 9:20 PM

It was sure nice seeing Fred Thompson share the stage with McCain. C’mon Fred. Do the right thing. It would go a long way in assuaging us conservatives.

Mojave Mark on June 3, 2008 at 9:20 PM

Since about 11:00 AM (central) every story said that Obama had won. This was all started by AP. And yet, in light of that, Clinton is still going to pull off at least one more victory. I find that really neat. And boy, if I could just dream for a moment, can you imagine the great ‘O’ giving his speech tonight in front of the backdrop of two primary defeats? I know, I know, it can’t happen…can it?

Weight of Glory on June 3, 2008 at 9:21 PM

Fox: Clinton will spend the next couple of days with undeclared delegates and superdelegates, making her case. “South Dakota looked good to them”.

She’s going forward. She’s not conceding.

amerpundit on June 3, 2008 at 9:21 PM

Right after Obama’s speech go pop Black Hawk Down in the DVD. That’ll sober ya up.

Limerick on June 3, 2008 at 9:22 PM

Update: Dude, McCain/Clinton. It’s time. Especially if the alternative is McCain/Huckabee.

Either way, it’s “game over, man“.

malan89 on June 3, 2008 at 9:23 PM

What if the Michelle video is for real? Will the super delegates bolt?

Terrye on June 3, 2008 at 9:26 PM

Right after Obama’s speech go pop Black Hawk Down in the DVD. That’ll sober ya up.

I like to go with either The Patriot, Red Dawn (AVENNNNNGE MEEEEEEE!!!!!), or Behind Enemy Lines II: Axis of Evil (if you can get past the corniness, it’s actually an AWESOME movie) for my post-Obama speech fix.

malan89 on June 3, 2008 at 9:26 PM

malan89 on June 3, 2008 at 9:26 PM

I think I’m going to watch Red River for healing.

Weight of Glory on June 3, 2008 at 9:28 PM

Update: A fait accompli: CNN and NBC finally join the AP in reporting that Barry O’s clinched enough delegates to win the Democratic nomination. Congrats to Democrats for nominating the first major-party black candidate in American history.

Congratulations for putting skin color before competency?

TheBigOldDog on June 3, 2008 at 9:30 PM

They’re so happy at CNN (I can’t get FNC here). I hope Hillary comes out and bursts their balloon. If you look at the regular delegate count, she’s only 67 behind, and she can close the gap at the convention credentials committee.
Maybe I’m clutching at straws, but I just don’t want Operation Chaos to end.

infidel65 on June 3, 2008 at 9:30 PM

They’ve called South Dakota for Hillary? This ain’t good for the Messiah

Dudley Smith on June 3, 2008 at 9:31 PM

I think I’m going to watch Red River for healing.

Weight of Glory on June 3, 2008 at 9:28 PM

Can’t beat some John Wayne.

malan89 on June 3, 2008 at 9:32 PM

Congratulations for putting skin color before competency?

C’mon. Do you really think Hillary is super-competent? She reeks.

Allahpundit on June 3, 2008 at 9:33 PM

If you look at the regular delegate count, she’s only 67 126 behind, and she can close the gap at the convention credentials committee.

infidel65 on June 3, 2008 at 9:30 PM

Holmes on June 3, 2008 at 9:34 PM

Does Hillary sound like it’s not over… Or is it the old bait and quit speech…

Y314K on June 3, 2008 at 9:36 PM

Congrats to Democrats for nominating the first major-party black candidate in American history.

Ugh. I expect more from you, AP. Focus on the color of his skin, not his policy. Awesome.
————————————————-
BTW, why did CNN cut to the Jillian’s arcade in Concord Mills (an outlet mall in Charlotte) just as they called it for Obama? And there were like 10 people there. WTF, CNN?

malan89 on June 3, 2008 at 9:36 PM

C’mon. Do you really think Hillary is super-competent? She reeks.

Allahpundit on June 3, 2008 at 9:33 PM

And yet you are planning to write her in.

mikeyboss on June 3, 2008 at 9:36 PM

C’mon. Do you really think Hillary is super-competent? She reeks.

Allahpundit on June 3, 2008 at 9:33 PM

Who’s more competent? Who’s more experienced? What’s Obama’s qualifications? What has he accomplished except becoming good at reading other people’s words off a teleprompter? Why has this man won?

TheBigOldDog on June 3, 2008 at 9:38 PM

Why has this man won?

Identity politics. Whatever. America gets what she deserves when it comes to elected officials.

VolMagic on June 3, 2008 at 9:39 PM

And there’s the 270 electoral vote card.

steveegg on June 3, 2008 at 9:39 PM

What if the Michelle video is for real? Will the super delegates bolt?

Terrye on June 3, 2008 at 9:26 PM

Unless the video shows her delivering the speech while snorting coke at a Satanist ceremony during which she molests a goat- no.

Hollowpoint on June 3, 2008 at 9:39 PM

And yet you are planning to write her in.

He lives in NY. It’s a throw away vote. I just hopes he snaps a picture of his voting machine with a cell phone to show us his write in. My suggestion: Hillary “Hilldog” Clinton. I wanna be the poll worker who gets to see that.

malan89 on June 3, 2008 at 9:40 PM

Who’s more competent? Who’s more experienced? What’s Obama’s qualifications? What has he accomplished except becoming good at reading other people’s words off a teleprompter? Why has this man won?

TheBigOldDog on June 3, 2008 at 9:38 PM

The only think Obama’s done… Is give the MSM religion (They all belong to the Obama parish)… Other then that… Nada…

Y314K on June 3, 2008 at 9:40 PM

He lives in NY. It’s a throw away vote.

By that logic, each of our votes is a throwaway. It won’t make a difference. Nobody wins a state by one vote.

mikeyboss on June 3, 2008 at 9:41 PM

I actually shed a tear a second ago. Who thought I’d be crying at watching Hillary’s implosion? I hope we still get street riots in Denver. I LOVE the guy in the yellow striped shirt right behind her left shoulder. He’s sooooo sad. I feel sorry for him. Also, anybody else notice how she stacked the area of the bleacher’s in camera view with black people? Isn’t that from the Obama playbook?

malan89 on June 3, 2008 at 9:44 PM

Nobody wins a state by one vote.

You obviously didn’t live in Palm Beach County, FL sometime around November 2000.

malan89 on June 3, 2008 at 9:45 PM

I think Bill Clinton needs to stop putting on Umpa Lumpa Bronzerx3…

Y314K on June 3, 2008 at 9:45 PM

Nobody wins a state by one vote.
You obviously didn’t live in Palm Beach County, FL sometime around November 2000.

malan89 on June 3, 2008 at 9:45 PM

I don’t believe any of the recounts put the state margin at only one vote.

mikeyboss on June 3, 2008 at 9:46 PM

Hollowpoint:

I could have lived without that picture in my head.

Terrye on June 3, 2008 at 9:47 PM

I actually shed a tear a second ago. Who thought I’d be crying at watching Hillary’s implosion? I hope we still get street riots in Denver. I LOVE the guy in the yellow striped shirt right behind her left shoulder. He’s sooooo sad. I feel sorry for him. Also, anybody else notice how she stacked the area of the bleacher’s in camera view with black people? Isn’t that from the Obama playbook?

malan89 on June 3, 2008 at 9:44 PM

I count 7 uncle tom’s…. And Waldo ins behind to the left…

Y314K on June 3, 2008 at 9:47 PM

Congrats to Democrats for nominating the first major-party black candidate in American history.

I’m not as magnanimous as you. Who cares if he’s the first if he’s the worst?

Buy Danish on June 3, 2008 at 9:48 PM

By that logic, each of our votes is a throwaway. It won’t make a difference. Nobody wins a state by one vote.

mikeyboss on June 3, 2008 at 9:41 PM

When a state predicably votes a certain way by a large margin, a vote in the opposite direction is nothing more than symbolic. It has no effect on the election, and thus meaningless.

Hollowpoint on June 3, 2008 at 9:49 PM

Hillary’s going to Denver baby!

Valiant on June 3, 2008 at 9:49 PM

IT’s NOT OVER… FRAZIER IS NOT DOWN… FRAZIER IS NOT DOWN…

Y314K on June 3, 2008 at 9:49 PM

Hillary snuck in the “come to my website and give me money” right at the end. I was so confused when she talked all that time and didn’t beg for money.

e-pirate on June 3, 2008 at 9:50 PM

Hillary says:
“I will make no decision tonight. It’s your campaign. Go to hillaryclinton.com, share your thoughts with me, and show me the $$$”.
And it shall be done, Hillary, it shall be done.
ON TO DENVER
ON TO DENVER
ON TO DENVER

malan89 on June 3, 2008 at 9:51 PM

When a state predicably votes a certain way by a large margin, a vote in the opposite direction is nothing more than symbolic. It has no effect on the election, and thus meaningless.

Hollowpoint on June 3, 2008 at 9:49 PM

I disagree. Symbols also send a message.

Also, the same could be said logically about a state that votes in one’s own direction. Meaningless vote.

mikeyboss on June 3, 2008 at 9:51 PM

DEN VER DEN VER DEN VER DEN VER

gxpgxp on June 3, 2008 at 9:51 PM

Anyone here thinking of throwing some money her way? Keep the dream alive?

mikeyboss on June 3, 2008 at 9:52 PM

Always end in a downer Hill…lol

IT’s NOT OVER… FRAZIER IS DOWN But Not Out…

Y314K on June 3, 2008 at 9:53 PM

Who cares if he’s the first if he’s the worst?

Exactly.

I was so confused when she talked all that time and didn’t beg for money.

You know our girl. She’d never go through a whole speech without begging at least once. For God’s sake, she needs money to buy bull horns for the Denver street riots.
I’m still LOVING the yellow shirt guy. Now he just keeps shaking his head in agreement.
ON
TO
DENVER

malan89 on June 3, 2008 at 9:54 PM

WOW… Shela Jackson is everywhere… LOL

And she is an uncle tom according to the press…

Y314K on June 3, 2008 at 9:55 PM

Anyone here thinking of throwing some money her way

I’ve got my $25 on the way. Like I said earlier, who’s going to pay for the bull horns? You can’t have convention riots without bull horns. Gosh. You people don’t think!

I don’t believe any of the recounts put the state margin at only one vote.

mikeyboss on June 3, 2008 at 9:46 PM

Please. Those recounts were complete BS. Gore people were making up votes. Bush people were counting Gore votes as Buchanan votes. It was chaos. Nobody knows what the real count was.

malan89 on June 3, 2008 at 9:57 PM

What do they (Les Clintons) know that we don’t?

SouthernGent on June 3, 2008 at 9:58 PM

Congrats to Democrats for nominating the first major-party black candidate in American history.

They`ll hold this over us FOREVER!

ThePrez on June 3, 2008 at 9:59 PM

I’ve got my $25 on the way. Like I said earlier, who’s going to pay for the bull horns? You can’t have convention riots without bull horns. Gosh. You people don’t think!

ROFLMAO! I wanna see some Grandma’s like that lady at the rules meeting doin’ some yellin’ on some bullhorns in Denver!

TheBigOldDog on June 3, 2008 at 9:59 PM

I’m not as magnanimous as you. Who cares if he’s the first if he’s the worst?

Buy Danish on June 3, 2008 at 9:48 PM

Sheesh- I’m against the whole identity politics thing as the next person here, but come on- he’s the first black (well, half anyways) major party candidate to run for President. As much as I dislike Obama, congratulations are still in order.

It’s a significant milestone considering that only 50 years ago there were “white only” drinking fountains, and 20 years ago the thought of a black man having a solid chance of actually winning was almost unthinkable.

Hollowpoint on June 3, 2008 at 10:00 PM

Anyone here thinking of throwing some money her way

I’ve got my $25 on the way. Like I said earlier, who’s going to pay for the bull horns? You can’t have convention riots without bull horns. Gosh. You people don’t think!

Well those bull horns better be made out of recycle materials & they better buy eco bucks for the riot or u’ll have a riot on the riot…lol

Y314K on June 3, 2008 at 10:00 PM

Please. Those recounts were complete BS. Gore people were making up votes. Bush people were counting Gore votes as Buchanan votes. It was chaos. Nobody knows what the real count was.

malan89 on June 3, 2008 at 9:57 PM

I agree with you there,and think that only supports the idea that a single vote is meaningless.

mikeyboss on June 3, 2008 at 10:00 PM

Also, the same could be said logically about a state that votes in one’s own direction. Meaningless vote.

mikeyboss on June 3, 2008 at 9:51 PM

Not at all. In that case, your vote was for the candidate that won the state and it’s electoral votes.

Hollowpoint on June 3, 2008 at 10:02 PM

I wanna see some Grandma’s like that lady at the rules meeting doin’ some yellin’

That woman is my hero.
“And I’m not gonna shut my mouth anymore! That’s not my America! I’m no second class citizen. And GOD DAMN the Democrats! Why do you want my name? Are you the CIA? The FBI?”

malan89 on June 3, 2008 at 10:03 PM

Not at all. In that case, your vote was for the candidate that won the state and it’s electoral votes.

Hollowpoint on June 3, 2008 at 10:02 PM

Either way, my individual vote does not change the outcome, other than infinitesimally affecting the margin.

mikeyboss on June 3, 2008 at 10:04 PM

Y’all think you’ve seen the last of Hillary?

Huh.

Et tu Brute on June 3, 2008 at 10:06 PM

I can’t stand her.

I loathe Obama.

(think Seinfeld)

Domino on June 3, 2008 at 10:07 PM

I’m thinking maybe she had two reasons for not conceding:

-Don’t create the image of all these folks crying at her event.

-Big infusion of $ tonight to reduce her campaign debt.

mikeyboss on June 3, 2008 at 10:07 PM

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