Carter: Florida, Michigan voters “disqualified themselves”

posted at 10:45 am on May 8, 2008 by Ed Morrissey

Jimmy Carter appeared on the Tonight Show last night to offer his view on the upcoming credentials fight at the Democratic National Convention. The world-renowned election observer, who has argued for the legitimacy of Hamas, argued against the legitimacy of seating delegates from Florida and Michigan in Denver. He told Jay Leno that those voters had “disqualified themselves” by moving their primary dates ahead of the limitation of the DNC:

Who knew Steve Doocy had such passion in defending Democrats in Florida and Michigan? He makes a couple of decent points in this rant, especially ridiculing the notion that the voters disqualified themselves; those decisions got made by party leaders and state legislatures, and also by Howard Dean and the DNC. The national party botched this exercise in discipline by completely negating the impact of the two states. The RNC handled it appropriately by reducing their impact but still allowing the states to seat delegates and have some impact on the results.

Carter isn’t entirely wrong here, in that the parties had to take steps to punish states that broke the rules. However, the smug dismissal of American votes as illegitimate coming just after his insistence that a terrorist group should be recognized because it won an election provides a mind-bending irony that may just be too large to contemplate all at once. Maybe if Florida and Michigan voted to endorse Hamas, Carter’s opinion would change?


Related Posts:

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

Who knew Steve Doocy had such passion in defending Democrats in Florida and Michigan?


Shrug.

There was an attack ad on Obama posted on youtube a few weeks ago and there were people here who had a similar passion defending Obama for some strange reason.

wise_man on May 8, 2008 at 10:49 AM

I hear they have scary scary bunnies in Michigan and Florida. No wonder he wants to keep them away…

Mr. Bingley on May 8, 2008 at 10:50 AM

And Carter has disqualified himself from being referred to as president. Let’s just call him donkey-butt from now on.

fogw on May 8, 2008 at 10:51 AM

Mr. Vice President,

Could you set aside a little portion of your Wyoming ranch for us to build Grandpa Jimmuh a little home (away from the media and terrorist/dictators) for him to spend the rest of his days?

Dr.Cwac.Cwac on May 8, 2008 at 10:51 AM

Geeze, I wonder who he’s supporting?

Where’s AL GORE defending the disenfranchized voters in Florida… lost his passion after 2000?

stenwin77 on May 8, 2008 at 10:52 AM

He’s my favorite comedian. I also like Jay Leno.

a capella on May 8, 2008 at 10:52 AM

Maybe if Florida and Michigan voted to endorse Hamas, Carter’s opinion would change?

I’m sure you would not have a problem with that in Dearbornistan.

Dr.Cwac.Cwac on May 8, 2008 at 10:53 AM

The utter incompetence of our politicians is mind-bending. Between the RINOs and the arrogance and ineptitude of the Democrats, I’m not sure how this country hasn’t collapsed in on itself. The party that screams disenfranchisement at every turn, screwed their owned voters and shot themselves in the foot. Morons.

robblefarian on May 8, 2008 at 10:54 AM

Maybe he’s now pissed off enough Democrats so that they won’t like him either.

deewhybee on May 8, 2008 at 10:54 AM

Eh, according to Carter, if they’re American or an ally of, they have no legitimacy, but Hamas, or the Palestinians, well that’s a different story. I really despise Carter. I wish he’d just go live with the freaking Palestinians.

4shoes on May 8, 2008 at 10:54 AM

. Between the RINOs and the arrogance and ineptitude of the Democrats, I’m not sure how this country hasn’t collapsed in on itself.

Yet. Wait.

JiangxiDad on May 8, 2008 at 10:55 AM

Holy crap… I agree with Jimmy Carter. Someone quick… give me some more guns and religion! Seriously though, I’m big in living with the consequences of your decisions. Florida and Michigan party leaders should live and die by their decision. Stupid decision, it was.

craig on May 8, 2008 at 10:56 AM

Oh that Jimmah. He’s got to be just a little excited that the Dims are now going to take the “most under qualified guy to ever get the nomination” title away from him.

Sugar Land on May 8, 2008 at 10:57 AM

I really would like to know, does Jimmy Carter have any serious influence in politics? Or is he just someone who strives for media attention?

Weebork on May 8, 2008 at 10:59 AM

Carter’s dementia is awe-inspiring.

pseudonominus on May 8, 2008 at 10:59 AM

The voters disqualified themselves the minute they signed on with the “No Liberty” Donkey Party.

kirkill on May 8, 2008 at 10:59 AM

I want the constitution to decide votes, not a party.

Wade on May 8, 2008 at 11:00 AM

Carter isn’t entirely wrong here, in that the parties had to take steps to punish states that broke the rules.

I very much agree with this point. While it sucks for the people in Florida and Michigan, it’s the fault of the idiots in that state who insisted on having early primaries, and thought that the DNC would blink. The DNC didn’t blink, and I think that was an important precedent for future primary seasons.

However, with what happened this year, methinks there will be less of a scramble to have such an early primary. I doubt that this will last so long in 2012, but think of the impact California would have had if they had kept it late in the season like they had in the past.

And a personal pet peeve: Where’s all the people (especially in the media) talking about a “brokered convention”? This is a situation where that “should” be happening. ANSWER: Because a “brokered convention” isn’t ever going to happen. It’s just something the media talks about because if if it did happen, it would be cool.

asc85 on May 8, 2008 at 11:01 AM

I can’t understand why Florida and Michigan taxpayers — not just Democrats, all taxpayers — are not suing both the state parties and the DNC for fraud. These were publicly funded elections held for the express purpose of selecting delegates to decide the Democratic nominee for President. That’s what they accepted the money for and what the event was scheduled for.

Instead of “disqualifying” the outcome and disenfranchising Michigan and Florida voters it was the DNC’s responsibility to cancel the event and return the money. Otherwise it is a clear case of fraud (i.e. tricking people with a promise and willfully failing to deliver).

miles on May 8, 2008 at 11:03 AM

Michigan and Florida “rats” made their decisions with full understanding what the consequences would be. They need to be held accountable to the voters for their actions and that isn’t going to happen if the delegates are seated as if they didn’t break the rules.

This is tough love time.

highhopes on May 8, 2008 at 11:05 AM

Funny that the Dems are so set on following the rules in not seating the delegates for Michigan & Florida…but immigration laws?

Sorry, not trying to sway the focus of the thread…just say’in.

PappaMac on May 8, 2008 at 11:05 AM

Hey man Hamas won. They are an arguement against democracy in the Middle East. So what if they are terrorists? What was Bush supposed to do? Promote free elections then poo poo on the winner because they don’t like them? You can withdraw aid as a result of Hamas’ actions but you cannot, with a straight face, refuse to recognize the winners of a free election.

Theworldisnotenough on May 8, 2008 at 11:06 AM

Instead of “disqualifying” the outcome and disenfranchising Michigan and Florida voters it was the DNC’s responsibility to cancel the event and return the money.

In the case of Michigan, anyway, the deal here was that the primary was fully paid for by the taxpayers and included both the GOP and “rat” primaries. One of the sticking points when “do over primary” talk was discussion on who would be expected to foot the bill for another election.

highhopes on May 8, 2008 at 11:08 AM

You can withdraw aid as a result of Hamas’ actions but you cannot, with a straight face, refuse to recognize the winners of a free election.

Ummm, your statement answers itself. The Bush administration recognizes that Hamas won the election. An election means that people get to choose their leaders. However elections have consequences, especially for those electorates who choose poorly. The loss of aid is a consequence for the Palestinians’ choosing terrorists as their representatives. Perhaps the Palestinians will choose more wisely next time. (But I doubt it.)

aunursa on May 8, 2008 at 11:13 AM

Since former President Carter said it then it’s so. End of argument.

TooTall on May 8, 2008 at 11:15 AM

Jimmy Carter disenfranchising votes he doesn’t like the outcome of. Just perfect.

indythinker on May 8, 2008 at 11:15 AM

I’m not sure how this country hasn’t collapsed in on itself.

I like to think it’s because politicians have less influence than it seems on what really drives the country, the people who go to work, buy, sell, take care of their families …

mikeyboss on May 8, 2008 at 11:17 AM

Instead of “disqualifying” the outcome and disenfranchising Michigan and Florida voters it was the DNC’s responsibility to cancel the event and return the money. Otherwise it is a clear case of fraud (i.e. tricking people with a promise and willfully failing to deliver).

Hey, they’re democrats. It’s what they do. Are you truly upset with the puppy that pees on the carpet out of excitement, or the snake that strikes out of instinct?

The point that most people seem to miss is that the entire episode is the epitome of why these people shouldn’t be in charge of anything – not even a homeowner’s association or voluntary neighborhood beautification panel.

And I slightly disagree with Jiangxidad – we don’t need a change in form of government, just a tremendous housecleaning of the sludge and slime that have built up over the years. Kind of like the grease trap in a decent restaurant. You clean the trap, not overhaul the menu.

Wind Rider on May 8, 2008 at 11:17 AM

It says a lot about the character ( or lack of ) of the Democratic Party, that they still seek counsel from such miserable failures like Jimmy Carter, George McGovern and Al Gore.

Must be their version of the union “seniority” thing.

RMR on May 8, 2008 at 11:18 AM

Oh, and Carter must be worried about his legacy as worst US President ever, particularly with the options available from the Dhimms today…

Wind Rider on May 8, 2008 at 11:18 AM

Obviously FLA and MI voters need to bomb cafes, then Jimmy will come to their rescue.

rbj on May 8, 2008 at 11:20 AM

Hey man Hamas won. They are an arguement against democracy in the Middle East. So what if they are terrorists? What was Bush supposed to do? Promote free elections then poo poo on the winner because they don’t like them? You can withdraw aid as a result of Hamas’ actions but you cannot, with a straight face, refuse to recognize the winners of a free election.

Hey, man, Hitler won. They are an argument against facism in Europe. So what if they’re Nazis? What was Roosevelt supposed to do? Promote free elections, then poopoo on the winnter because they don’t like them. You can withdraw aid as a result of Nazi actions, but you cannot with a straight face refuse to recognize the winners of a free election.

I recognize that Hamas (and the Nazis) won free elections, as most people do. It’s irrelevant to “recognize” that, it’s relevant to say that they’re still terrorists and they have no standing in decent negotiations for peace.

mjk on May 8, 2008 at 11:20 AM

This thing would be in the courts by now if it wasn’t blue-on-blue.

Valiant on May 8, 2008 at 11:22 AM

Now what happened to “count every vote”?
Will someone ask this of the party leaders?

right2bright on May 8, 2008 at 11:23 AM

I’m big in living with the consequences of your decisions. Florida and Michigan party leaders should live and die by their decision. Stupid decision, it was.

craig on May 8, 2008 at 10:56 AM

The citizens of these states should not be punished because of their politicians stupd decisions.

How would you like it if your vote were rendred meaningless because of something your state representatives did?

Not in this country.

EJDolbow on May 8, 2008 at 11:29 AM

Carter and McGovern should join each other in a small room, have a marathon slobber-fest and stay out of our lives.

rplat on May 8, 2008 at 11:31 AM

Since when has Carter cared about following the rules????

MarkTheGreat on May 8, 2008 at 11:33 AM

Were the Michigan/Florida party leaders elected by the rank and file Democrats? Because if they were, Carter’s right.

Darth Executor on May 8, 2008 at 11:35 AM

Count every vote!… unless they would hurt your candidate.

Carter’s two faces need more make-up.

The depraved deceiver is showing through, times 2.

profitsbeard on May 8, 2008 at 11:38 AM

What, do you think, will be the reaction of the FLA and MI voters in November?

OldEnglish on May 8, 2008 at 11:40 AM

I still would like to know if JImmy Carter has any serious influence in politics. Any help?

Weebork on May 8, 2008 at 11:41 AM

Is there a cure for Carterrhea?

bloggless on May 8, 2008 at 11:41 AM

Fox & friends and the Morning Schmoe are just BFBC-big fluffy balls of crap…only exception and only time I watch is when Ms. Michelle Malkin is on…I wish she would just spank the 3 co-hosts on this show!

el Vaquero on May 8, 2008 at 11:46 AM

In the case of Michigan, anyway, the deal here was that the primary was fully paid for by the taxpayers and included both the GOP and “rat” primaries.

Doesn’t matter. A dispute between the state party and DNC doesn’t entitle them to hold a “nudge-nudge, wink-wink” sham election and claim they fulfilled their obligation to the taxpayers who paid for it. By going ahead with a presidential primary — regardless of the down ticket or GOP — the Democrats are obligated to honor the outcome or are guilty of fraud.

miles on May 8, 2008 at 11:46 AM

He said many lies last night that bothered me. Especially the one where he said, “Nobody said I shouldn’t go.”

He also said a few times about how the U.S. did this and that wrong while Hamas was doing things right.

Arrogant terrorst tool. There was a hint of where that arrogance came from. He mentioned a story about his mother and a prepared speech they gave to her. She threw it on the ground and said, “I know what I’m going to say.”

shick on May 8, 2008 at 11:49 AM

Aren’t these people the same ones who are against voter IDs because the poor and elderly (and illegals) won’t be able to vote? And now they are stopping the voters in MI and FL from having their voices be heard?

Hmmmmm….

Pcoop on May 8, 2008 at 11:53 AM

“Why should they be penalized for what party leaders did?”

Were the party leaders elected? I’m sure some of them were. If not, they were probably elected by people who were elected. So should we really be penalized for things our elected officials do? It happens all the time. It sucks. Get the people in your state who pushed to break the rules and allowed this to happen out of office one way or another. Or work to change the rules. Stop complaining about people saying your election wasn’t legitimate when, at least in Michigan’s case, one of the two remaining contenders for the nomination wasn’t even on the ballot.

I feel bad for the Michigan and Florida voters who don’t have representation, I do. But it seems like a lot of them are angry at the wrong people. And did anybody else find it funny when Hillary, at her presser yesterday, said, “I’ve been saying consistently for months now that these votes need to be heard.” She’s right that she’s been consistent for months… since around the time that she won Michigan and Florida. Still, she hasn’t really been consistent since I don’t recall her piping up when Michigan and Florida were disqualified in the first place. Could that have been that, at the time, doing so might have angered other early state voters from Iowa and New Hampshire who still had yet to vote? Hmm.

Yoosaion on May 8, 2008 at 11:57 AM

A vote for Hussein is a vote for a second term for Carter.

Akzed on May 8, 2008 at 11:57 AM

Best election evah! They keep exposing all of their hypocrisies. By the time this is all over it could take a generation to repair all the damage they are doing to themselves.

TheBigOldDog on May 8, 2008 at 12:00 PM

Were the Michigan/Florida party leaders elected by the rank and file Democrats? Because if they were, Carter’s right.

Darth Executor on May 8, 2008 at 11:35 AM

The date was moved up by the Florida legislature, which is currently Republican-controlled, but it had the support of Dems. Both parties claimed that they didn’t realize what the effect would be on the Dems, and that sounds plausible if you read this LA Times story from a year ago, before they were embroiled in the death match.

The bottom line appears to be that even the DNC wasn’t clear on what the penalty would be, and they now seem to be changing the rules daily.

Nichevo on May 8, 2008 at 12:01 PM

fogw on May 8, 2008 at 10:51 AM

Perfect! Donkey-butt it is! (Although I’m still partial to President Peanut.)

Buford Gooch on May 8, 2008 at 12:02 PM

Were the party leaders elected? I’m sure some of them were. If not, they were probably elected by people who were elected. So should we really be penalized for things our elected officials do? It happens all the time. It sucks. Get the people in your state who pushed to break the rules and allowed this to happen out of office one way or another. Or work to change the rules. Stop complaining about people saying your election wasn’t legitimate when, at least in Michigan’s case, one of the two remaining contenders for the nomination wasn’t even on the ballot.

I feel bad for the Michigan and Florida voters who don’t have representation, I do. But it seems like a lot of them are angry at the wrong people. And did anybody else find it funny when Hillary, at her presser yesterday, said, “I’ve been saying consistently for months now that these votes need to be heard.” She’s right that she’s been consistent for months… since around the time that she won Michigan and Florida. Still, she hasn’t really been consistent since I don’t recall her piping up when Michigan and Florida were disqualified in the first place. Could that have been that, at the time, doing so might have angered other early state voters from Iowa and New Hampshire who still had yet to vote? Hmm.

Yoosaion on May 8, 2008 at 11:57 AM

That’s completely immaterial. People were told by the government when to show up and vote and millions did. Democrats told us over and over that every vote should count and every vote should be counted in 2000. They were willing to sit for days and count dimples on ballots to divine, “voter intent.” Now, when it suits them, they are willing to disenfranchise millions because they don’t like the date these people were told to vote. Think about that for a moment…

TheBigOldDog on May 8, 2008 at 12:05 PM

Wrong!!!

I hate to defend Carter, but he said the delegates disqualified themselves. He was not talking about the common voters.

I can understand that the delegates are more connected and include the party big wigs who decided to break the rules. So, I see a connection between the delegates’ actions and them being responsible for not being seated.

I also note that the clip they showed was cut off very abruptly. Did Carter qualify his statement in the next breath? We’ll never know. This is Fixed News.

If we are going to complain about the liberties taken by Dean-o with McCain’s words, we should hold others up to the same standards.

tommylotto on May 8, 2008 at 12:15 PM

Maybe if Florida and Michigan voted to endorse Hamas, Carter’s opinion would change?

Hmmm… or is it simpler. Hillary won both those elections. Hamas supports Obama.

As to elections matter? Sure they do, but this is NOT a real election. This is a party event. You do NOT have a right to vote in this silly excercise of public funding. Problem is that the two parties have become so ingrained in this countries government, that they now think they ARE the government.

As to Hamas and elections. IMO in a Democracy, because the people choose the government… they should be held accountable for its actions. Iran is a democracy, and the meme that we don’t like your government, but have nothing against the people is stupid. It behooves us to convince those people to change their government… by waging war on the PEOPLE, not just the government.

Romeo13 on May 8, 2008 at 12:25 PM

Stop complaining about people saying your election wasn’t legitimate when, at least in Michigan’s case, one of the two remaining contenders for the nomination wasn’t even on the ballot.

You’re missing the point. Accepting funds for an event that is scheduled for the express purpose of delivering something… and then going ahead with the event as a meaningless exercise and refusing to deliver that “something” is fraud. Assuming the people who commited this act were elected — which is not a given — since when does that shield people from criminality? They either needed to hold the primary they accepted money for or cancel it. Not hand out presidential primary ballots with the intention of disqualifying them.

As far as Obama’s name not being on the ballot in Michigan… that was not required in the pledge not to campaign that he signed with the DNC. His campaign knew they wouldn’t win the state so they removed his name in order to make this claim their making (i.e. if the results are accepted he is being unfairly victimized). But by not demanding that the whole empty charade be cancelled he participated in it.

miles on May 8, 2008 at 12:28 PM

Just listening to Carter makes me sick.

29Victor on May 8, 2008 at 12:28 PM

Wrong!!!

I hate to defend Carter, but he said the delegates disqualified themselves. He was not talking about the common voters.

tommylotto on May 8, 2008 at 12:15 PM

Anybody can a Florida delegate. All you have to do is fill out a form and people are selected based on the racial and gender breakdowns they lay out

TheBigOldDog on May 8, 2008 at 12:29 PM

Many Florida and Michigan Democrats were not disenfranchised. They voted in the Republican primary.

I believe it was part of Hillary’s game plan to make the Florida and Michigan Democrat primaries worthless so that she could help ensure here general election adversary would be John McCain.

Hillary didn’t count on a challenge from her hand-picked VP (Obama) for the Democrat nomination. Now she wants to have her cake and eat it, too.

Red Pill on May 8, 2008 at 12:30 PM

Anybody can a Florida delegate. All you have to do is fill out a form and people are selected based on the racial and gender breakdowns they lay out

TheBigOldDog on May 8, 2008 at 12:29 PM

Then how do they guarantee that those delegates vote for the candidate they are supposed to vote for?

Red Pill on May 8, 2008 at 12:31 PM

tommylotto on May 8, 2008 at 12:15 PM

Oh, and by the way, the 120 district-level delegates are elected March 1st.

After the district-level delegates are elected, those persons not chosen will be considered candidates for district-level alternate positions unless they specify otherwise when filing.

Facts are stubborn things….

TheBigOldDog on May 8, 2008 at 12:34 PM

Red Pill on May 8, 2008 at 12:31 PM

Go to the link. They have to sign pledge forms…

TheBigOldDog on May 8, 2008 at 12:34 PM

Here you go, for all of you little carter fans.
And a little quote from that website: (be sure and look at “who we are”)

“Every practice that discourages people from voting is a blow to democracy.” – Dr. Keith Jennings

right2bright on May 8, 2008 at 12:44 PM

From Carnak the Magnificent to Carter the Incompetent.

mymanpotsandpans on May 8, 2008 at 12:48 PM

This is going to turn my stomach more than the thought of participating in a three-way with Rosie O’Donnel and Michael Moore, but…

…I agree with Carter. Rules are rules, and maybe people will think about this the next time they consider breaking them.

James on May 8, 2008 at 12:49 PM

Carter and everyone else knows that it is all the fault of the Jews.

awake on May 8, 2008 at 12:51 PM

I wish Jimmuh could trade places with….say… Ronald Reagan. Right Now!!!

kcd on May 8, 2008 at 12:53 PM

This states taking turns garbage has got to stop. Let’s talk about all the states that didn’t get a say in the GOP nomination that weren’t ‘disqualified’. Have the primaries on the same day. (This will stop cross-over as well). And then have a run off election.

I call for run offs in the general as well.

– The Cat

P.S. Or make a reality show out of it. . . No wait, that’s what they’re doing now.

MirCat on May 8, 2008 at 1:56 PM

Drill. In. Anwar.

HotJavaJack on May 8, 2008 at 10:04 AM

What about Hillary? She’s gotta just be brimming with Fossil Fuels.

– The Cat

MirCat on May 8, 2008 at 1:57 PM

…I agree with Carter. Rules are rules, and maybe people will think about this the next time they consider breaking them.

James on May 8, 2008 at 12:49 PM

Better read my links, these are Obama supporters, everyone of them. They disagree with you and Carter.
Don’t you think Obama and the rest of the liberals should decide…not us conservatives.

right2bright on May 8, 2008 at 2:04 PM

I watched the segment last night and thought Carter came off like a thoughtful, congenial guest. He was very likeable. If only he could get his mind right.

moxie_neanderthal on May 8, 2008 at 2:06 PM

Woops, that last one was for another thread.

MirCat on May 8, 2008 at 2:10 PM

Cart is so old and senile, he thought he was talking about a fix to the chad problem. Disqualify them.

Wade on May 8, 2008 at 2:26 PM

Don’t you think Obama and the rest of the liberals should decide…not us conservatives.

right2bright on May 8, 2008 at 2:04 PM

Of course I think all registered Democrats–and only registered Democrats–should decide who their nominee is going to be, and all registered Republicans–again, only–should do the same for our nominee. That’s why closed primaries are an absolute requirement. And I think party registration should close months before the primary, with special provisions for those who will turn 18 between the deadline and the election. There is also, as noted above by MirCat, no legitimate reason to perpetuate the traveling circus primary campaign farce that drags on for months…instant communication media has made it obsolete.

Until the ‘one day national primary election’ is implemented, though, the system can be metagamed and corrupted, as it has been this year…by both sides. While having Obama supporters disagree with Carter and me obviously distresses me greatly…the parties are under no obligation to change their rules or the punishment for breaking them.

James on May 8, 2008 at 2:28 PM

I wish Carter what I wish Soros, the ultimate punishment for the two old farts, who’re dangerous to this country, Soros even more than Carter.

Entelechy on May 8, 2008 at 4:36 PM

The ultimate punishment being that their love loses this fall.

Entelechy on May 8, 2008 at 4:36 PM

There is also, as noted above by MirCat, no legitimate reason to perpetuate the traveling circus primary campaign farce that drags on for months…instant communication media has made it obsolete.

How’s this for a legitimate reason? If the Dem primaries hadn’t dragged on so long the things we’ve learned about Obama’s background — Rev. Wright, Bill Ayers, shitty bowler — would either not have come to light or been minimized by the Drive-By media to the point of obscuring their significance. No, we need less instant communication media and more personal face time with the candidates.

Sadly, this is a result of the “professional” media abandoning responsible journalism for shameless cheerleading. And cutting down the primary process would only give them more power to sucker voters into picking the smooth talking Marxist of their choosing.

I mean, look at Iowa. Do you think voters there would still go for B.O. if they knew then what we know now?

miles on May 8, 2008 at 4:45 PM

Maybe if Florida and Michigan voted to endorse Hamas, Carter’s opinion would change?

Good point–and no question about it. He would throw this country, the democrat party, and even his white grandmother under bus to enhance the legitimacy of Hamas. It’s his one true passion.

urbancenturion on May 8, 2008 at 8:15 PM

Funny that the Dems are so set on following the rules in not seating the delegates for Michigan & Florida…but immigration laws?

Sorry, not trying to sway the focus of the thread…just say’in.

PappaMac on May 8, 2008 at 11:05 AM

and….if this were a general election, and 2 states had…”issues?…oh boy would you hear an outcry. (Assuming an outcry favored the dems of course)of disenfranchisement. Why arent these people being “disenfranchised”? remember that outcry in the last election? rules be damned? (i think it was something about mail in/early voters/chads….). Ha…whatever.

HunnyWaggin on May 9, 2008 at 7:54 AM

Oh, and Carter must be worried about his legacy as worst US President ever…
Wind Rider on May 8, 2008 at 11:18 AM

Yea, he started that when Nixon died, wondered why they all showed HIM respect. He was wondering where his respect was going to come from…Ha. So he tries to get his legacy out of the toilet bowl and…on to the toilet seat? funny thing is, the toilet seat, is more dirty than the water in the bowl.

HunnyWaggin on May 9, 2008 at 8:13 AM