McCain on economy: More taxes aren’t going to help

posted at 2:45 pm on April 15, 2008 by Ed Morrissey

John McCain delivered his first major economic policy speech at Carnegie Mellon University as the GOP nominee, and conservatives will find much to like in it. He hits Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama hard on their tax increases, turning Obama’s “audacity of hope” against him. McCain offers a few clunkers, especially when harping on CEO pay, but overall it promises a clear difference between his platform and the Democratic policies in 2008.

This portion is the highlight:

There’s never been a problem Americans couldn’t solve. We are the world’s leaders, and leaders don’t fear change, pine for the past and dread the future. We make the future better than the past. That is why I object when Senators Obama and Clinton and others preach the false virtues of economic isolationism. Senator Obama recently suggested that Americans are protectionist because they are bitter about being left behind in the global economy. Well, what’s his excuse for embracing the false promises of protectionism? Opening new markets for American goods and services is indispensable to our future prosperity. We can compete with anyone. Senators Obama and Clinton think we should hide behind walls, bury our heads and industries in the sand, and hope we have enough left to live on while the world passes us by. But that is not good policy and it is not good leadershi p. And the short-sightedness of these policies can be seen today in Congress’ refusal to vote on the Colombian Free Trade Agreement.

When new trading partners can sell in our market, and American companies can sell in theirs, the gains are great and they are lasting. The strength of the American economy offers a better life to every society we trade with, and the good comes back to us in many ways — in better jobs, higher wages, and lower prices. Free trade can also give once troubled and impoverished nations a stake in the world economy, and in their relations with America. In the case of Colombia, a friend and crucial democratic ally, its stability and economic vitality are more critical now, as others in the region seek to turn Latin America away from democracy and away from our country. Trade serves all of these national interests, and the interests of the American economy as well — and I call on the Congress once again to put this vital agreement to an up or down vote.

Conservatives will also like this pledge:

It is not enough, however, to make little fixes here and there in the tax code. What we need is a simpler, a flatter, and a fair tax code. As president, I will propose an alternative tax system. When this reform is enacted, all who wish to file under the current system could still do so. And everyone else could choose a vastly less complicated system with two tax rates and a generous standard deduction. Americans do not resent paying their rightful share of taxes — what they do resent is being subjected to thousands of pages of needless and often irrational rules and demands from the IRS. We know from experience that no serious reform of the current tax code will come out of Congress, so now it is time to turn the decision over to the people. We are going to create a new and simpler tax system — and give the American people a choice.

And in reaching out to the bitter and cynical middle-American voters, McCain makes clear on which side he sees himself:

In the same way, many in Congress think Americans are under-taxed. They speak as if letting you keep your own earnings were an act of charity, and now they have decided you’ve had enough. By allowing many of the current low tax rates to expire, they would impose — overnight — the single largest tax increase since the Second World War. Among supporters of a tax increase are Senators Obama and Clinton. Both promise big “change.” And a trillion dollars in new taxes over the next decade would certainly fit that description.

Of course, they would like you to think that only the very wealthy will pay more in taxes, but the reality is quite different. Under my opponents’ various tax plans, Americans of every background would see their taxes rise — seniors, parents, small business owners, and just about everyone who has even a modest investment in the market. All these tax increases are the fine print under the slogan of “hope”: They’re going to raise your taxes by thousands of dollars per year — and they have the audacity to hope you don’t mind.

So McCain hits most of the notes that Republicans like to hear in economic plans. He also castigates Republicans, but on grounds conservatives will approve: for spending big while controlling Congress. McCain says that the GOP must return to its empowering, small-government roots, and repudiate the free-spending practices of 2001-2006. He repeats his pledge to veto bills with pork and to use the veto for a wide range of other purposes to control spending and growth at the federal level.

He hits a couple of bricks, too, but nothing major. McCain talks about CEO salaries but never addresses federal intervention. McCain wants to revamp unemployment benefits into a retraining program, but that sounds a little odd, assuming that one job loss means that the skill set is no longer viable. Conservatives may have a bigger issue with his approach on mortgages, which makes Uncle Sam a co-signer on a massive refinancing program, replacing unrealistic ARMs with 30-year fixed-rate loans, guaranteed by the American taxpayer. While this program at least targets the right people for a bailout, having a bailout at all only encourages riskier behavior in the future.

Outside of these issues, the overall speech can help conservatives take comfort in a McCain campaign for the White House. It will remind many of the real differences between McCain and either Democrat, and set the stage for an interesting general-election debate.


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Sounds like Fred!s visit with McCain this weekend made an impression. He is basically stating Fred!s tax platform.

ihasurnominashun on April 15, 2008 at 2:52 PM

It’s a speech we heard before from many.

Frankly, I don’t care about Tax Code, Fair Tax, or whatever.

When it comes to the Economy, I want America to be free from the Chinese and the Saudi bondage.

Is anybody in Washington D.C. listening?

I don’t think so.

Indy Conservative on April 15, 2008 at 2:54 PM

Hey, not-so-Maverick-McVain, then why did you oppose tax cuts in 2001 (when were actually in a recession) and 2003?

And don’t feed the Mark McKinnon line that “b/c there were no off-setting reductions in spending,” because I watched Juan McVain on C-Span in both 2001 and 2003 explaining why he was voting against the tax cuts and none of his objections had to do with the line of bull he is trying to push now. He is a liar! He was a sore loser in 2001 and wanted to punish the president of his “own party” so that Teddy K and Tom D would think that he was wonderful…..

How can you tell when Senor McVain is lying; that’s right – when his lips are moving….

Branch Rickey on April 15, 2008 at 2:56 PM

I care about the tax code after writing a five figure check to the IRS this morning.

The very last thing this country needs is a tax-hiking Democrat in office, trying to buy votes with counterproductive social programming schemes.

Or a lawyer in office, who thinks America’s prosperity is only enhanced by the bloodsucking plaintiff’s bar.

NoDonkey on April 15, 2008 at 2:58 PM

McCain is much more inspiring than Bush ever was.

Win Win Win on April 15, 2008 at 2:58 PM

Conservatives may have a bigger issue with his approach on mortgages, which makes Uncle Sam a co-signer on a massive refinancing program, replacing unrealistic ARMs with 30-year fixed-rate loans, guaranteed by the American taxpayer. While this program at least targets the right people for a bailout, having a bailout at all only encourages riskier behavior in the future.

When will other kinds of irresponsible gamblers like those who lost at Las Vegas be getting their bailouts?

MB4 on April 15, 2008 at 2:59 PM

I see the “conservative jackasses for Obama” are out in full force already.

NoDonkey on April 15, 2008 at 2:59 PM

The American Utopia demands taxes. The workers simply aren’t doing enough. Anybody who does not support more and more taxes is simply being rightist, and they will be dealt with, accordingly. All will be taxed. In fact, it is not taxation; it is the willful contribution of the workers to the American Utopia. You fools. Remember this, you are making voluntary contributions. You owe the State. You owe me. There can be no Utopia without increasing the burden placed upon the backs of the workers. What good are backs, if they aren’t required – if they don’t volunteer – to carry more and more of a load?

You fools. Utopia needs you.

- Barack Obama [with special thanks to Michelle Obama]

OhEssYouCowboys on April 15, 2008 at 3:02 PM

It would be wonderful if he really means this. I doubt polosi or reid will ever let this get to a vote. I think they will block, with the help of rino’s, everything a republican president brings before them unless they think it will help them.
L

letget on April 15, 2008 at 3:02 PM

Conservatives may have a bigger issue with his approach on mortgages, which makes Uncle Sam a co-signer on a massive refinancing program, replacing unrealistic ARMs with 30-year fixed-rate loans, guaranteed by the American taxpayer. While this program at least targets the right people for a bailout, having a bailout at all only encourages riskier behavior in the future.

Congress created this mess, and unfortunately congress is gonna muck around trying to “fix” it. If their “fix” makes it much more difficult for crazy mortgages to get granted in the future, sigh….OK.

That’s why the $7000 tax credit for those who buy a foreclosure didn’t bother me that much. At least it would give me a shot to get some of my tax money back instead of just having the feds buy out a bunch of bums and give them their houses gratis, or having the feds hand a bunch of money to Countrywide without letting me have a piece of the pie.

This pie is gonna get served, which is a damn shame. So let normal folks like me have a shot at a slice, eh?

grumble grumble

funky chicken on April 15, 2008 at 3:04 PM

Indy Conservative on April 15, 2008 at 2:54 PM

I am listening and I’m with you, but unfortunately, like yours, my influence is rather limited.

MB4 on April 15, 2008 at 3:05 PM

McCain talks about CEO salaries but never addresses federal intervention.

Obama’s solution is to allow stockholders to have a non-binding vote on executive salary packages. There really is no downside to mentioning it. For those with whom the issue resonates, McCain may score some points. Should Obama call him out on it, McCain will have the opportunity to explain that Obama’s solution was to introduce feel good legislation that did absolutely nothing to address the problem.

rw on April 15, 2008 at 3:08 PM

What problem?

If you don’t like what a company is paying a CEO, don’t buy their stock.

NoDonkey on April 15, 2008 at 3:10 PM

Ah yes, but then there is the McCain-Lieberman carbon cap and trade tax to feed the global warming hoax. Sorry, got the name wrong, the new improved name of the bill is Warner-Liberman to protect the original author.

This tax is expected to be $1,200,000,000,000 dollars over five years.

So is this in or out? A vote is scheduled for June.

tarpon on April 15, 2008 at 3:13 PM

McCain blamed the slowdown of the nation’s economy in part on bankers and lenders who “forgot some of the basic standards of their own profession,” leading to the current crisis in housing and credit.

He singled out James Cayne, 74, chairman of hobbled securities firm Bear Stearns Cos., and Angelo Mozilo, 69, chief executive of Countrywide Financial Corp., which lost $704 million last year.

“Something is seriously wrong when the American people are left to bear the consequences of reckless corporate conduct, while Mr. Cayne of Bear Stearns, Mr. Mozilo of Countrywide, and others are packed off with another forty- or fifty million for the road,” McCain said.

MB4 on April 15, 2008 at 3:15 PM

Sounds like h has People from Rudy’s team.. Good move.

Steve Forbes.

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 3:23 PM

Sounds like Fred!s visit with McCain this weekend made an impression. He is basically stating Fred!s tax platform.

ihasurnominashun on April 15, 2008 at 2:52 PM

I was thinking the same thing.

Weight of Glory on April 15, 2008 at 3:23 PM

Bill O’Reilly was blasting the CEO of GE yesterday..

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 3:25 PM

Ah yes, but then there is the McCain-Lieberman carbon cap and trade tax to feed the global warming hoax. Sorry, got the name wrong, the new improved name of the bill is Warner-Liberman to protect the original author.

This tax is expected to be $1,200,000,000,000 dollars over five years.

So is this in or out? A vote is scheduled for June.

tarpon on April 15, 2008 at 3:13 PM

I was gonna say the same thing. This is a tax. I hope we’re not going to start playing games about what a tax is.

JiangxiDad on April 15, 2008 at 3:25 PM

Remember Rudy’s one page tax form?

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 3:25 PM

Bill O’Reilly was blasting the CEO of GE yesterday..

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 3:25 PM

The CEO of GE, Jeff Immelt, is a liberal POS. He deserves to be blasted, and continually. Because of him we get the likes of Olberdouche and all the other insane libs at NBC/MSNBC and all their affiliated media companies.

JiangxiDad on April 15, 2008 at 3:26 PM

I only wish McCain realises that his global warming crap is going to cost TRILLIONS in energy surcharges for nothing.

You can’t be a fair-weather tax cutter.

TexasJew on April 15, 2008 at 3:27 PM

It is not enough, however, to make little fixes here and there in the tax code. What we need is a simpler, a flatter, and a fair tax code. As president, I will propose an alternative tax system. When this reform is enacted, all who wish to file under the current system could still do so. And everyone else could choose a vastly less complicated system with two tax rates and a generous standard deduction. Americans do not resent paying their rightful share of taxes — what they do resent is being subjected to thousands of pages of needless and often irrational rules and demands from the IRS. We know from experience that no serious reform of the current tax code will come out of Congress, so now it is time to turn the decision over to the people. We are going to create a new and simpler tax system — and give the American people a choice.

Rudy’s one page tax form.

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 3:27 PM

Remember Rudy’s one page tax form?

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 3:25 PM

No, when he was mayor, the NYC tax booklet and return was particularly long, and expensive as usual. It still is.

JiangxiDad on April 15, 2008 at 3:27 PM

I know how McCain can get his new and simpler tax system.

Do like Ronald Reagan did. Have a news conference and look right into the camera and talk to the American people. Ignore those barking, snarling dogs (MSM) at the end of their leashes.

Then layout his new and improved tax system and ask the people to call, email, and fax their reps and senators. Then say good-night and then have Larry the Cable Guy come on right after him and say: Gitter Done.

cjs1943 on April 15, 2008 at 3:28 PM

The Madness of Ben Bernanke

The dollar is in a tailspin, the trade deficit is growing and a recession is on the horizon. The American way of life is in serious danger. But the head of the Federal Reserve keeps on pumping easy credit into the system — a crazy policy that will worsen the crisis.

The credit-financed consumer boom of recent years is coming to a painful end. Today’s American Way of Life has no chance of surviving the coming years undamaged. The virus will continue to ravage its way through the financial system.

The property crisis is likely to spread to credit card providers soon and will then probably infect car manufacturers, furniture makers and all the other firms that owe their sales increases to the growth in credit finance. “The virus will keep on infecting the system,” one management board member from a large bank said, requesting anonymity in return for the candor of his analysis.

His argument is that banks that grant mortgages to home buyers virtually unable to pay their bills are unlikely to be especially scrutinizing when it comes to lending cash to the buyers of fridges, cars and furniture. Indeed, a furniture store in Miami recently tried to lure consumers with the following offer: buy now, pay your first credit installment in three years, and no need for a down-payment.

The credit-financed way of life is typical of the US these days. Many people resort to credit to plug the gap between the lifestyle they have become accustomed to and their declining wages.

Meanwhile the Federal Reserve is urging the banks to go on taking risks. It has been injecting cash into the banking system for the past half-year while urging bank CEOs in confidential chats to offer more credit. The aim is to keep on financing consumer spending and even to stimulate it further — for reasons of patriotism.
There’s a word for this policy — madness.

MB4 on April 15, 2008 at 3:28 PM

And what is it with this “us against them” crap?

McCain is politically schizophrenic. He never has spent time in the private sector with the rest of us, and it shows..

TexasJew on April 15, 2008 at 3:29 PM

McCain should actively campaign for rural voters and southern democrats based on good sense policies such as those he spoke about above: free trade = more markets for our products = more jobs in places where real estate is cheap and people want to work, ie, rural America. McCain is the only pro-life candidate, another reason for religious rural voters to vote for McCain, not to even mention the patriotism of rural America.

JustTruth101 on April 15, 2008 at 3:32 PM

cjs1943 on April 15, 2008 at 3:28 PM

That would be straight talk, alright. You should advise McCain.

JustTruth101 on April 15, 2008 at 3:33 PM

When it comes to the Economy, I want America to be free from the Chinese and the Saudi bondage.

Too bad, higher taxes are always evil according to the new Bush religion, no matter what the effect is on the budget deficit. Regardless of what Greenspan or anyone else thinks.

To quote Jim Rogers in Barrons this weekend, between the budget and trade deficits, about $1 bil is flowing out of the US every 15 months: “You do the math.”

bayam on April 15, 2008 at 3:35 PM

No, when he was mayor, the NYC tax booklet and return was particularly long, and expensive as usual. It still is.

JiangxiDad on April 15, 2008 at 3:27 PM

Watch…

http://youtube.com/watch?v=5LjinfOW6BI

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 3:36 PM

$1 bil

correction: $1 trillion

bayam on April 15, 2008 at 3:36 PM

It’s immigration, stupid. You blew it. You showed your a$$. I don’t care what you say now, you blew it with me.

saiga on April 15, 2008 at 3:39 PM

Not bad. It has holes in it like tarpon pointed out. But the content of this speech is surprisingly well balanced and should appeal to the concerns, both rational and emotional, of Americans across the political spectrum. My favorite part:

As president, I will also order a prompt and thorough review of the budgets of every federal program, department, and agency. While that top to bottom review is underway, we will institute a one-year pause in discretionary spending increases with the necessary exemption of military spending and veterans benefits. “Discretionary spending” is a term people throw around a lot in Washington, while actual discretion is seldom exercised. Instead, every program comes with a built-in assumption that it should go on forever, and its budget increase forever. My administration will change that way of thinking.

RushBaby on April 15, 2008 at 3:39 PM

While we are parsing words of the class baiting populist, McCain, how about some words to live by spoken by a great Republican who feared no Democrat and died on this day more than 140 years ago.

You cannot help the poor by destroying the rich.

You cannot strengthen the weak by weakening the strong.

You cannot bring about prosperity by discouraging thrift.

You cannot lift the wage earner up by pulling the wage payer down.

You cannot further the brotherhood of man by inciting class hatred.

You cannot build character and courage by taking away men’s initiative and independence.

You cannot help men permanently by doing for them what they could and should do for themselves.

Abraham Lincoln

If Senator McCain truly understood and lived by Lincoln’s timeless words about the proper role of government we wouldn’t be having this conversation.

Angry Dumbo on April 15, 2008 at 3:42 PM

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 3:36 PM

Actually I saw that interview with Cavuto. I was just saying that like all the other candidates, a lot of what they promised they didn’t do when they governed. However, in no way do I particularly accuse Rudy of that.

JiangxiDad on April 15, 2008 at 3:43 PM

Angry Dumbo on April 15, 2008 at 3:42 PM

Thanks. That’s a keeper–right onto my HD.

JiangxiDad on April 15, 2008 at 3:45 PM

JiangxiDad on April 15, 2008 at 3:43 PM

McCain has Steve Forbes that was formerly on Rudy’s team, thats where this is coming from, and it’s a good sign.

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 3:46 PM

Just curious and all but where’s the money to pay for the ever-growing immigration mess going to come from? It continues to grow more expensive every day, and under McCain we know it will not cease. So what’s his economic plan with regards to that? If he isn’t going to raise taxes (We’ll see…) then what? Cut spending elsewhere?

Grayson on April 15, 2008 at 3:51 PM

McCain has Steve Forbes that was formerly on Rudy’s team, thats where this is coming from, and it’s a good sign.

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 3:46 PM

I won’t argue with that.

JiangxiDad on April 15, 2008 at 3:51 PM

Thanks. That’s a keeper–right onto my HD.

JiangxiDad on April 15, 2008 at 3:45 PM

Glad to help.

Angry Dumbo on April 15, 2008 at 3:54 PM

I see the “conservative jackasses for Obama” conservatives with principles are out in full force already.

NoDonkey on April 15, 2008 at 2:59 PM

Fixed.

HYTEAndy on April 15, 2008 at 4:04 PM

saiga on April 15, 2008 at 3:39 PM

I second that.

HYTEAndy on April 15, 2008 at 4:06 PM

Just curious and all but where’s the money to pay for the ever-growing immigration mess going to come from? It continues to grow more expensive every day, and under McCain we know it will not cease. So what’s his economic plan with regards to that? If he isn’t going to raise taxes (We’ll see…) then what? Cut spending elsewhere?

Grayson on April 15, 2008 at 3:51 PM

No Pork-Barrel earmarks(he said he would veto all of them), and since when did increasing taxes, increase revenue and spur economic growth?

Also, yes… cut spending, McCain has been complaining about that forever.

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 4:08 PM

Yeah, dittos to those of you sane, thinking people above who talk about his economy destroying embracement of GoreBull warming, and willingness to use Executive Orders to enforce his will on it.

For me that is even worse than his open borders / amnesty plans that he tries (unsuccessfully) to hide. I could ‘hold my nose and vote” for all of his other anti-conservative stuff, but not those.

LegendHasIt on April 15, 2008 at 4:12 PM

We need to ask ourselves how we got to this stage and how to prevent it in the future. Presidential candidates are a liberal, socialist and marxist. Can’t we, as a country, do better then this? I am an abandoned conservative without a party who doesn’t know what the hell to do or how to fix this mess.

trs on April 15, 2008 at 4:12 PM

I see the “conservative jackasses for Obama” conservatives with principles are out in full force already.

How about “conservative” jackasses principly for Obama?

NoDonkey on April 15, 2008 at 4:13 PM

No, when he was mayor, the NYC tax booklet and return was particularly long, and expensive as usual. It still is.

JiangxiDad on April 15, 2008 at 3:27 PM

Well, I agree that local taxes are high, but the form isn’t really all that bad.

Big S on April 15, 2008 at 4:13 PM

How about “conservative” jackasses principly for Obama conservatives for conservative candidates.

NoDonkey on April 15, 2008 at 4:13 PM

Fixed it for you, again. Too many of these errors, and people will think you actually are willing to sell out our principles.

Just lookin’ out for a brother. ;)

HYTEAndy on April 15, 2008 at 4:28 PM

No Pork-Barrel earmarks(he said he would veto all of them), and since when did increasing taxes, increase revenue and spur economic growth?

Also, yes… cut spending, McCain has been complaining about that forever.

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 4:08 PM

All I’m saying is, while this speech sounds pretty good, he’s ignoring several elephants in the room. There’s global warming that people have mentioned for one, then there’s our favorite subject when it comes to him. Illegal immigration costs ungodly sums of money every year, and I don’t hear anything from him on how exactly he’s going to pay for it. Since he won’t just stop it cold, someone has to pay, and that someone is always the American taxpayer. I’d just like to know what, if anything, he plans to do about it, economically speaking.
Oh well, I guess when he closes Gitmo and fires all our interrogators he might save some money there.

Grayson on April 15, 2008 at 4:29 PM

Conservatives for Obama is an Oxymoron.

How could a Conservative be in for the MOST Liberal Senator out of 100?

A Senator that has never been bi-partisan, or compromised..(thats how you get the MOST LIBERAL LABEL)

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 4:31 PM

Grayson on April 15, 2008 at 4:29 PM

He has said, secure the border first(both of the democrats have said amnesty in the first 100days, Clinton said it in a debate and Obama agreed)

Global Climate Change was in the GOP 2004 party platform..

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 4:34 PM

A Senator that has never been bi-partisan, or compromised..(thats how you get the MOST LIBERAL LABEL)

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 4:31 PM

But you know there’s also such a thing as being too bi-partisan and too “compromised.” That’s a fitting word for all three candidates actually…

Grayson on April 15, 2008 at 4:36 PM

He has said, secure the border first(both of the democrats have said amnesty in the first 100days, Clinton said it in a debate and Obama agreed)

Global Climate Change was in the GOP 2004 party platform..

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 4:34 PM

So he won’t grant amnesty? And just because GCC was in the GOP 2004 platform doesn’t make it make any more sense in 2008.

Grayson on April 15, 2008 at 4:38 PM

you voted for it in 2004?(If you voted for Bush)

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 4:39 PM

you voted for it in 2004?(If you voted for Bush)

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 4:39 PM

I live in CA. My vote means squat.

Grayson on April 15, 2008 at 4:40 PM

Not saying that that both plans would be the same..

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 4:40 PM

So he won’t grant amnesty? And just because GCC was in the GOP 2004 platform doesn’t make it make any more sense in 2008.

Grayson on April 15, 2008 at 4:38 PM

McCain is talking about bio-metric ID and a secured border first, the democrats are talking about anmesty in the first 100 days..

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 4:41 PM

You figure out what is better.

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 4:41 PM

Thats Amnesty in the first 100days with no bio-metric ID and no secured border ever.

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 4:43 PM

Not that I support tax increases, I don’t want to pay no more then very little… but at what point did less taxes start helping?

PresidenToor on April 15, 2008 at 5:00 PM

I think most “Conservatives for Obama” are mobys anyway. Especially after recent revelations about Obama’s liberalism.

If they are actually thinking that 4 years of Obama will usher the next Reagan—just remember how much of our current war is cleaning up the mess “just 4 years” of Jimmah Cahtah brought us.

Sekhmet on April 15, 2008 at 5:07 PM

Reality check: McCain is the GOP candidate.

Important question: Do you want Obama or McCain? Those are your two options. No, there isn’t a third no matter what you’d like to think. The writing is on the wall.

TheUnrepentantGeek on April 15, 2008 at 5:13 PM

Well, I agree that local taxes are high, but the form isn’t really all that bad.

Big S on April 15, 2008 at 4:13 PM

LLC/UBT/Est.Tax/R.E.Tax/Personal Tax/– I got em all in NYC.

JiangxiDad on April 15, 2008 at 5:14 PM

You cannot help the poor by destroying the rich.

You cannot strengthen the weak by weakening the strong.

You cannot bring about prosperity by discouraging thrift.

You cannot lift the wage earner up by pulling the wage payer down.

You cannot further the brotherhood of man by inciting class hatred.

You cannot build character and courage by taking away men’s initiative and independence.

You cannot help men permanently by doing for them what they could and should do for themselves.

Abraham Lincoln

Angry Dumbo on April 15, 2008 at 3:42 PM

That this was posted by someone who’s handle is Angry Dumbo, during Bittergate, makes it manyfold sweeter. Thank you.

Entelechy on April 15, 2008 at 5:20 PM

Also, yes… cut spending, McCain has been complaining about that forever.

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 4:08 PM

Well then McVain should have spent his time in the senate working to that instead of a frontal assault on the First Amendment because he felt the need to atone for playing footsy with the Keating and the other 4 Democrats involved. Why is it McVain is almost always with the dimwits???

Branch Rickey on April 15, 2008 at 5:25 PM

Fixed.

HYTEAndy on April 15, 2008 at 4:04 PM

A+++

Branch Rickey on April 15, 2008 at 5:27 PM

I see the “conservative jackasses for Obama” conservatives with principles are out in full force already.

NoDonkey on April 15, 2008 at 2:59 PM

Fixed.

HYTEAndy on April 15, 2008 at 4:04 PM

What is principled here? It’s one thing to be against McCain, by principle, but to then give your vote to an out right Marxist…If that’s principled, I’m the Pope.

Entelechy on April 15, 2008 at 5:36 PM

Well then McVain should have spent his time in the senate working to that instead of a frontal assault on the First Amendment because he felt the need to atone for playing footsy with the Keating and the other 4 Democrats involved. Why is it McVain is almost always with the dimwits???

Branch Rickey on April 15, 2008 at 5:25 PM

He was! Thats why he voted against the Bush tax cuts the first time, because they did not have spending restraints attached to them.

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 5:38 PM

What is principled here? It’s one thing to be against McCain, by principle, but to then give your vote to an out right Marxist…If that’s principled, I’m the Pope.

Entelechy on April 15, 2008 at 5:36 PM

The McCain camp has already told conservatives that they don’t need or want our votes so what we conservatives should do is eat the excrement sandwich from McCain, and d%mn well like it? Oh, btw, if you think McCain wouldn’t sell us all out to Marxist principles for the elites to like him; you might want to take looky over his Cow Fart Hoax / Marxist control over individual liberty plan.

A TWICE LOSER McVAIN in the senate may be way more effective then him being POTUS….

Branch Rickey on April 15, 2008 at 5:41 PM

Not that I support tax increases, I don’t want to pay no more then very little… but at what point did less taxes start helping?

PresidenToor on April 15, 2008 at 5:00 PM

If you remember, at the End of Clinton’s term, Bush was handed a recession, then 9/11 that hit our economy HUGE.. to say that the tax cuts didn’t help is to deny reality.

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 5:42 PM

RushBaby on April 15, 2008 at 3:39 PM

that was almost word for word from Fred for potus web site.
good deal mccain, but i still dont trust you.

palefaced on April 15, 2008 at 5:42 PM

He was! Thats why he voted against the Bush tax cuts the first time, because they did not have spending restraints attached to them.

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 5:38 PM

No he didn’t vote against the tax cuts for those reasons at that time. You can read the transcript on C-Span. He was a sore loser to Bush and wanted to humiliate him.

All 3 remaining “candidates” are an insult to the republic.

Branch Rickey on April 15, 2008 at 5:43 PM

A TWICE LOSER McVAIN in the senate may be way more effective then him being POTUS….

Branch Rickey on April 15, 2008 at 5:41 PM

He has been elected more times, and has served his country more honorably than Obama ever has.

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 5:45 PM

Branch Rickey on April 15, 2008 at 5:43 PM

Is that why he has his own plans?

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 5:46 PM

A TWICE LOSER McVAIN in the senate may be way more effective then him being POTUS….

Branch Rickey on April 15, 2008 at 5:41 PM

He has been elected more times [was this before of after he left his sick wife for an heiress?], and has served his country more honorably than Obama ever has.

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 5:45 PM

TWICE LOSER OF POTUS!!!!

Branch Rickey on April 15, 2008 at 5:48 PM

Is that why he has his own plans?

Chakra Hammer on April 15, 2008 at 5:46 PM

Yes he does have his own plan to take away our liberty and hard earned money for a GLOBAL SCAM!!!!!!!!!!

Branch Rickey on April 15, 2008 at 5:50 PM

We’re always going to be bouncing around in a continuum between socialism and a relatively free economy. We’ll never get all the way to a completely free economy, because a significant proportion of Americans – not all of them true-blue liberals – will always be receptive to pleas for public welfare. The image of the Depression looms large in the American psyche, even among the grandchildren of those who lived through it, and speaking as a nation, we’ll never tolerate people starving in the streets or dying because they couldn’t get emergency medical care. The task awaiting a Republican presidential candidate is to make the case that we can address these humanitarian needs efficiently, without wasting vast sums on bloated state machinery or absurd middle-class entitlements. From that perspective, I think McCain did pretty well today.

Doctor Zero on April 15, 2008 at 5:54 PM

we’ll never tolerate people starving in the streets or dying because they couldn’t get emergency medical care. The task awaiting a Republican presidential candidate is to make the case that we can address these humanitarian needs efficiently, without wasting vast sums on bloated state machinery or absurd middle-class entitlements. From that perspective, I think McCain did pretty well today.

Doctor Zero on April 15, 2008 at 5:54 PM

We could afford a lot more things for the impoverished in our nation if we’d stop throwing money at places like Palestine for one. I wonder what his stance is on foreign aid…

Grayson on April 15, 2008 at 6:29 PM

Yup, flat tax. We’ve heard it from Steve Forbes, Ron Paul, and Fred Thompson. And now it’s coming out of anti-Bush-tax-cuts McCain’s mouth, and I don’t buy it.

But that’s me.

MadisonConservative on April 15, 2008 at 6:43 PM

If he had thrown in drilling for own oil…I’d have given it a B+. As it is, B-

SouthernGent on April 15, 2008 at 7:11 PM

If he had thrown in drilling for own oil……
SouthernGent on April 15, 2008 at 7:11 PM

He has already said that he intends to ban forever the possibility of drilling in ANWR, all the coastal areas and some of the interior areas that show great potential but haven’t been drilled yet.

LegendHasIt on April 15, 2008 at 8:07 PM

He has already said that he intends to ban forever the possibility of drilling in ANWR, all the coastal areas and some of the interior areas that show great potential but haven’t been drilled yet.

Good, there is only one solution, an Apollo-scale project for alternative energy, we should have started 20 years ago.

Squid Shark on April 15, 2008 at 8:22 PM

Good, there is only one solution, an Apollo-scale project for alternative energy, we should have started 20 years ago.
Squid Shark on April 15, 2008 at 8:22 PM

I should have gone on a diet 20 years ago too… But I’m not going to cut off both of my legs now to lose the excess weight.

Which is what McCain wants to do.

It is stupid to destroy the economy now because ‘they’ didn’t do what you wanted 20 years ago.

Lousy economies make for dirtier environments, not cleaner ones, in case you haven’t noticed.

Exploit now the most efficient energy mediums that are presently available… Use a percentage of the taxes from that to fund improving the inefficient alternative energy sources we have now, and to maybe look for new ones.

Oh yeah…. Lets also build more of the most efficient power plants: Nuclear.

LegendHasIt on April 15, 2008 at 9:06 PM

Oh yeah…. Lets also build more of the most efficient power plants: Nuclear.

I agree 110%

Green economies are for more sustainable, no?

Squid Shark on April 15, 2008 at 9:09 PM

We could afford a lot more things for the impoverished in our nation if we’d stop throwing money at places like Palestine for one. I wonder what his stance is on foreign aid…

Grayson on April 15, 2008 at 6:29 PM

I agree completely. I’m all in favor of abandoning the U.N. in favor of an American-led organization whose membership requirements include democratic elections, religious liberty, and complete legal cooperation with the American F.B.I. Membership in this organization would be an absolute pre-requisite for any U.S. foreign aid. No nation outside of this group would receive financial aid from any of its members, although humanitarian disaster assistance – conducted by the American military – would be offered.

Just in case anyone was thinking of writing me in on the Presidential ballot, the other two planks of my campaign platform would be a flat tax, and restriction of voting rights to net tax payers. The only recipients of government benefits in excess of their tax payments who would be allowed to vote would be members of the military. Oh, and I’m thinking of deploying Rover from “The Prisoner” to secure the Southern border.

Doctor Zero on April 15, 2008 at 9:09 PM

Green economies are for more sustainable, no?
Squid Shark on April 15, 2008 at 9:09 PM

Not on a large scale, while giving a high standard of living to the vast majority.

However, the reverse is always true: strong, sustainable economies are the ones that can afford to be ‘green’.

LegendHasIt on April 15, 2008 at 9:42 PM

well he got the part about us being overtaxed not undertaxed correct.

His housing plan is a hell of alot better than Hillary’s 5 year freeze on rates.

His gasoline tax holiday is ok also. It will allow the rebate checks to be spend the way they were intended at the stores instead of at the pump. But it will increase demand for gasoline. what we need is for people to stay home this summer. Dry up demand to the point that oil falls back to $60.00 knocking it off this “dollar/fed cut band wagon” that is is trading on.

If he follows thruogh on cutting pork and spending I’m all for it. Was planning on sitting home this nov. still might. but if BHO gets a little more scarier and McCain gets alittle more conservative then I might go vote.

This is the first speech I heaed him make that I agreed with more than I disagreed with.

There is no reason whatsoever that our government needs 3 trillion dollars a year just to fund day to day operations. just by cutting the use of paper on all those tax forms I had to fill out today would save millions. the government must come into the year 2008. Spend the money on upgrading the government infrastructe with new pc’s mainframes, etc instead of funding the social program of the month.

unseen on April 15, 2008 at 10:53 PM

agree 110%

Green economies are for more sustainable, no?

Squid Shark on April 15, 2008 at 9:09 PM

while I also agree let’s do it for the right reason like national security, lower prices, more compitetion, less pollution than for the man made myth of global warming. Take the Co2 as a polluiate out of the equation and green things become alot cheaper to build and use.

unseen on April 15, 2008 at 10:56 PM

Doctor Zero on April 15, 2008 at 5:54 PM

the strongest economies have always been those that mix socialism with capitalism. it is the mix that is important. Too much socialism and you stifle freedom, risk taking, upward and downward molbility. too much capitalism and you have a net drain of capital from the population into the hands of the few which stifles freedom, risk taking, upward and downward molbility. Before Reagan we had too much socialism. Today we are tilting towards too much capitalism. The fact that our government is bought and paid for shows this. while we need some addtional regulation to get the mix back on track (ex more shareholder power over boards/ceo’s/better big picture regulation of real estate market/banks/investment banks/markets) we do not need the wholesale takeover of the private sector that BHO and Hillary are advocating.

unseen on April 16, 2008 at 12:49 AM

You cannot bring about prosperity by discouraging thrift.
You cannot strengthen the weak by weakening the strong.
You cannot help little men by tearing down big men.
You cannot lift the wage earner by pulling down the wage payer.
You cannot help the poor by destroying the rich.
You cannot establish sound security on borrowed money.
You cannot further the brotherhood of man by inciting class hatred.
You cannot keep out of trouble by spending more than you earn.
You cannot build character and courage by destroying men’s initiative and independence.
And you cannot help men permanently by doing for them what they can and should do for themselves.
William J. H. Boetcker
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_J._H._Boetcker

JonM on April 16, 2008 at 7:31 AM

Today we are tilting towards too much capitalism. The fact that our government is bought and paid for shows this. while we need some addtional regulation to get the mix back on track (ex more shareholder power over boards/ceo’s/better big picture regulation of real estate market/banks/investment banks/markets) we do not need the wholesale takeover of the private sector that BHO and Hillary are advocating.

unseen on April 16, 2008 at 12:49 AM

I’d go so far as to say that excessive government corruption is the fault of socialism, not capitalism. Those vast lobbyist complexes ringing the Beltway wouldn’t be there if the government’s favors were not for sale. Limiting the power and scope of government is the only way to limit the ability of big-money interests to purchase influence. I think you’d have to look at the period leading up to the Depression to see a fair example of “too much capitalism,” and even there, the problem was still caused by un-free markets, not an excess of free market commerce. Un-free markets always lead to economic catastrophe, whether the restraints are imposed by socialist governments or rapacious capitalist robber barons.

Doctor Zero on April 16, 2008 at 9:35 AM