McCain booed in Memphis — but outlasts it

posted at 5:30 pm on April 4, 2008 by Ed Morrissey

John McCain went to Memphis to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King. He didn’t exactly get the warmest of receptions, but given his opposition to the federal holiday in King’s honor, understandable. McCain didn’t let that stop him, and in the end, he brings his audience around:

Saying “we are still left with a feeling of loss,” Sen. John McCain paid tribute today to the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in Memphis, at the Southern Christian Leadership Conference on the 40th anniversary of King’s death.

Most notably, McCain acknowledged that he was wrong to oppose creating a federal holiday in honor of the slain civil rights leader.

“We can be slow as well to give greatness its due, a mistake I made myself long ago when I voted against a federal holiday in memory of Dr. King,” McCain said. “I was wrong and eventually realized that, in time to give full support for a state holiday in Arizona. We can all be a little late sometimes in doing the right thing, and Dr. King understood this about his fellow Americans. But he knew as well that in the long term, confidence in the reasonability and good heart of America is always well placed.”

I have long argued that Republicans need to reach out to African-American voters, and that skipping the Tavis Smiley debate last September was a big mistake. McCain has decided to make the effort now, and got a predictable and understandable reaction. McCain obviously expected it, too, as he just waited out the reaction before explaining how he changed his mind on the issue and helped push for the adoption of a state holiday in Arizona afterwards.

This is smart politics, and it’s long overdue from Republicans. McCain may not win a lot of votes in Memphis as a result of this stop — I’d guess that he won’t win any at all — but at some point, the GOP has to pay some dues. McCain did that today, facing the feedback and eventually turning the boos into applause and a little bit of respect. Starting a dialogue isn’t easy and it doesn’t make for great sound bites, but it helps to lance a boil in politics that the Republicans have pretended doesn’t exist for too long.

It’s a first step — and long overdue.

Update (AP): Agreed, although I don’t for a moment believe that this will lead to any dialogue. It’s a good show by McCain; what’s right is right, whether it leads to extra votes or not.


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the GOP has to pay some dues

I’m not sure what you mean by that, Ed, but I think you imply that we have to kiss feet or crawl on glass because of what slave owners did 200 yrs ago. Or that we should apologize for not going along w/ the counterproductive War On Poverty. I disagree.

jgapinoy on April 4, 2008 at 5:35 PM

I know my people, they won’t stop booing until someone cuts them a check.

Zaire67 on April 4, 2008 at 5:35 PM

Every word: RESOUNDING AMEN!

RushBaby on April 4, 2008 at 5:36 PM

Another group of classy Democrats.

Can any group of Democrats act like anything older than a elementary school class?

These people should be booing Democrats – the party that’s ran urban areas into the ground and that was historically the party of segregation.

NoDonkey on April 4, 2008 at 5:36 PM

I mean we have to apologize for ignoring them for the last few decades. Republicans gave up on this voting bloc in the 1970s. We need to put out some effort to make our case on how Republican policies can improve their lives.

Ed Morrissey on April 4, 2008 at 5:37 PM

I’m not sure what you mean by that, Ed, but I think you imply that we have to kiss feet or crawl on glass because of what slave owners did 200 yrs ago. Or that we should apologize for not going along w/ the counterproductive War On Poverty. I disagree.

jgapinoy on April 4, 2008 at 5:35 PM

No, we should show up and listen, though.

RushBaby on April 4, 2008 at 5:38 PM

I can’t argue with that.

jgapinoy on April 4, 2008 at 5:40 PM

I have long argued that Republicans need to reach out to African-American voters

I don’t agree. I can’t think of any reason why African-Americans would vote Republican, so it doesn’t make any sense for the GOP to reach out, since the GOP can win elections with only 10% of the black vote as it is.

Every now and again, you hear that African-Americans are social cons, and the GOP could appeal to them on that basis. I think that’s hogwash, because 90% of blacks believe that the GOP is inherently racist, and aren’t going to vote for Republicans even if they agree with them on gay marriage.

As a policy matter, most black folks believe in expanding entitlements and handouts. The only way the GOP is going to make significant inroads in the African-American community would be to outpromise the Dems on entitlements, and that’s not possible, nor desirable.

Until black voters stop believing that Republicans are racist, there’s no point in outreach.

Enrique on April 4, 2008 at 5:40 PM

I saw this earlier, thought it was a good speech. It could have gone pretty sour, but McCain did well.

4shoes on April 4, 2008 at 5:41 PM

The price for slavery was already paid with the blood of over 600,000 Americans and it still isn’t enough. We tend to forget it was a Republican President who made it happen, and Republicans in Congress that made the Civil Rights acts possible. While I’m glad McCain did this, I think there’s been enough kissing of rear ends to last a lifetime.

jdawg on April 4, 2008 at 5:42 PM

President Bush really has an administration that “looks like America”, & he has done more for Black people worldwide than any mortal in history (referring to his AIDS efforts in Africa which have saved millions of lives). But I wonder if most Blacks still think he is racist.

jgapinoy on April 4, 2008 at 5:43 PM

I’d argue for a Thomas Sowell day.

That’d be sure make everyone get up offa that thang and hollah.

larkydozer on April 4, 2008 at 5:44 PM

Oh for goodness sake. Republicans have been reaching out to blacks for decades, to no avail. Yet it was Democrats, not Republicans, that invented and sustained Jim Crow. Democrats, not Republicans, that scuttled civil rights legislation in the 40s, 50s and 60s. It was the votes of Republican Senators that led, finally, to passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Blacks vote irrationally as a bloc for a party that treated them for many years as non-citizens, and even today treats skin color as a handicap.

If blacks want to reach out to me for a change, I’ll give them the number of the local Republican Party. If they don’t, well, we’ve prospered without their votes and can continue to do so.

km on April 4, 2008 at 5:44 PM

I can’t think of any reason why African-Americans would vote Republican, so it doesn’t make any sense for the GOP to reach out, since the GOP can win elections with only 10% of the black vote as it is.

How about the fact that the blacks have been failed by every government program one can imagine? The government like any other organization will be run in the interest of those who control it financially. Which is not the blacks. They should be at the forefront of the small government movement.

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 5:45 PM

what’s right is right, whether it leads to extra votes or not.

Precisely. It doesn’t mean you pander. It doesn’t mean you allow yourself to be abused in the name of “outreach” either. It means you do what your consciences and principals dictate and let the chips fall where they may.

TheBigOldDog on April 4, 2008 at 5:46 PM

Yet it was Democrats, not Republicans, that invented and sustained Jim Crow. Democrats, not Republicans, that scuttled civil rights legislation in the 40s, 50s and 60s. It was the votes of Republican Senators that led, finally, to passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965.

LOL

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 5:46 PM

I just watched the clip and thought McCain struck all the right notes. The part where he boldly admitted accountability for his vote was impressive. I really gotta say it: Wow!

RushBaby on April 4, 2008 at 5:46 PM

How about the fact that the blacks have been failed by every government program one can imagine?

Doesn’t matter. In politics, good intentions are always more important than outcomes.

Enrique on April 4, 2008 at 5:47 PM

Like him or hate him.
Agree with him or not.
He is our Republican candidate.
And we must vote for him.
Fear that Obama or Hillary lead this great country of ours.

HarryBalzac on April 4, 2008 at 5:48 PM

the GOP has to pay some dues

I mean we have to apologize for ignoring them for the last few decades. Republicans gave up on this voting bloc in the 1970s. We need to put out some effort to make our case on how Republican policies can improve their lives.

Ed Morrissey on April 4, 2008 at 5:37 PM

Ed, umm no. I am tired of the BS you can’t get anywhere because you are this or that. If people can’t make it on their own, learn from their mistakes, get a job to at least TRY to support themselves, and learn that they (and I am talking everybody, not just a specific body of people) can become productive to society and feel good about themselves by doing that, then that is what I am looking and hoping for.

I am tired of working my ever loving bottom off and seeing people buy a better TV (I don’t own anything fancy) or a better this or that, then what I can afford because I am being responsible.

I wonder what happened to being responsible for yourself and taking care of you and your own problems instead of relying on others.

upinak on April 4, 2008 at 5:48 PM

I agree it was the right thing to do, and I’d like to see Obama venture into a venue where not everyone worships him.

Here’s HuffPo’s astute take on the event:

Couldn’t McCain Have Asked A White Man To Hold His Umbrella?
Watch: McCain Booed During MLK Speech As Black Man Holds His Umbrella

You can’t make this stuff up.

juliesa on April 4, 2008 at 5:48 PM

How about Republicans reaching out to Americans? I think the worst development in politics was the destruction of the American identity and creed through the implementation of multi-culturalism and identity politics.

I thought it was a teaching moment when Katrina blew in and “exposed the racism in America” as the media put it. Just who ran and controlled New Orleans for the decades leading up to Katrina? Just who is in charge of the highest crime-rate areas and cities in our country? Just who advocates for the destruction of the nuclear family? Just who advocates for treating citizens like children in need of constant need of help and direction?

VolMagic on April 4, 2008 at 5:48 PM

While I’m glad McCain did this, I think there’s been enough kissing of rear ends to last a lifetime.

I hear you! I’m personally sick of it, and I do not want my kids growing up with the feeling that they’ve got to scrape and bow to anyone. Especially for something they never came close to even imagining.

4shoes on April 4, 2008 at 5:49 PM

Forgive me if the video mentions this: I don’t have sound on my computer here at work (good thing, too).

I thought the whole thing with MLK Day in AZ was that it would be adding another paid holiday to the calendar. It was a financial, rather than racial or ideological, issue. IIRC, the powers that be offered an MLK holiday if the state workers (largely unionized, I presume) would give up an existing paid holiday. In the end, the state caved, but it was always (mostly) about money. This was big news nationally because AZ wanted the Super Bowl and the NFL wouldn’t bring it there without them having MLK Day.

boko fittleworth on April 4, 2008 at 5:49 PM

what’s right is right, whether it leads to extra votes or not.

Precisely. It doesn’t mean you pander. It doesn’t mean you allow yourself to be abused in the name of “outreach” either. It means you do what your consciences and principals dictate and let the cards fall where they may.

TheBigOldDog on April 4, 2008 at 5:50 PM

We tend to forget it was a Republican President who made it happen, and Republicans in Congress that made the Civil Rights acts possible. While I’m glad McCain did this, I think there’s been enough kissing of rear ends to last a lifetime.

jdawg on April 4, 2008 at 5:42 PM

Gee, maybe that’s because Lincoln doesn’t even get HIS OWN HOLIDAY for pete’s sake!!!! Instead we’re giving it to MLK JR?? And Lincoln gets to share his holiday with the first president of our country. How much more G.. D… reaching out can we do?

MLK Jr would be saddened to see that racism is still alive and well in this country, and he’d be surpirsed to find out that it’s mostly blacks being racist toward whites these days.

NTWR on April 4, 2008 at 5:51 PM

Doesn’t matter. In politics, good intentions are always more important than outcomes.

War in Iraq would be a prime example of that. Agreed.

However, I’m saying there is a legitimate and intellectually honest platform to present to the black voters. As for the blacks behaving irrationally, the minute the Republican party stops being a haven for every racist piece of shit, their “irrational behavior” will change.

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 5:51 PM

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 5:51 PM

Rev. Wright is a Republican?

VolMagic on April 4, 2008 at 5:53 PM

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 5:51 PM

Senator Byrd is a Republican?

VolMagic on April 4, 2008 at 5:54 PM

Once the super delegates deliver the nomination to Hillary, the African-American voting block will be ripe for the picking — or at least difficult to motivate to go to the polls to vote for Hillary over McCain.

tommylotto on April 4, 2008 at 5:55 PM

To me, “reaching out” to any ethnic group is synonymous with pandering. What’s so different about black people that they need some sort of special message all their own? McCain speaks to all Americans when he speaks–I’m pretty sure that includes black people born in the U.S. too.

ggoofer on April 4, 2008 at 5:56 PM

As for the blacks behaving irrationally, the minute the Republican party stops being a haven for every racist piece of shit, their “irrational behavior” will change.

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 5:51 PM

For every racist POS? Really? And are you blaming the Republican party for the behavior of blacks? Seriously?

4shoes on April 4, 2008 at 5:57 PM

Once the super delegates deliver the nomination to Hillary
tommylotto on April 4, 2008 at 5:55 PM

That’s not going to happen. For some reason, the media is pushing BO. And he stinks. Good for us.

HarryBalzac on April 4, 2008 at 5:59 PM

No, I’m clearly referring to white racists.

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 6:00 PM

boko fittleworth:

Arizona had an MLK day—the third Sunday in January—for many years. Nobody got the day off with pay, though, so it was lobbied onto a Monday.

jdpaz on April 4, 2008 at 6:00 PM

skipping the Tavis Smiley debate last September was a big mistake

i’ve watched the Tavis Smiley debate in the past. last year or the year before the featured speaker was Farrakhan. refusing to share the stage or appear at the same forum with a known Farrahkan supporter doesn’t seem like a mistake to me. and make no mistake, Smiley gave great defference to Farrakhan.

DrW on April 4, 2008 at 6:02 PM

As for the blacks behaving irrationally, the minute the Republican party stops being a haven for every racist piece of shit, their “irrational behavior” will change.

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 5:51 PM

Uh huh. Tell me, which party has a former member of the KKK as a prominent Senator? Which party supported the continuation of slavery? Which party does Rev. Wright, a racist, belong to?

amerpundit on April 4, 2008 at 6:02 PM

Ugh, what has happened to this site?

Grayson on April 4, 2008 at 6:03 PM

No, I’m clearly referring to white racists.

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 6:00 PM

As usual, the white racists are the people the public pays attention to. How about Robert Byrd, prominent Democrat from West Virgina?

amerpundit on April 4, 2008 at 6:03 PM

We need to put out some effort to make our case on how Republican policies can improve their lives.

Ed Morrissey on April 4, 2008 at 5:37 PM

The blacks do not buy into the Republican policies because they have “put out some effort” to make Republican policies work. How do you suggest the Republicans can can make a case when the choir they are preaching to expects to achieve equality without effort?

Wade on April 4, 2008 at 6:04 PM

The audience had listened to white people speak before, but probably never someone quite THAT white.

Cicero43 on April 4, 2008 at 6:07 PM

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 6:00 PM

As opposed to purple racists?

VolMagic on April 4, 2008 at 6:08 PM

You can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make him drink.

SouthernGent on April 4, 2008 at 6:09 PM

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 5:46 PM

Moonbat

Al in St. Lou on April 4, 2008 at 6:09 PM

Uh huh. Tell me, which party has a former member of the KKK as a prominent Senator? Which party supported the continuation of slavery? Which party does Rev. Wright, a racist, belong to?

This garbage will fly here with the local kooks. Don’t expect it get any traction outside in the real world.

The party that supported slavery consisted of what are now the Republicans. I don’t know how heavily medicated you should be to try and sell me the idea that the racists from the South all moved to Massachusetts in the 60s, where they now reenact the biggest act of treason in the American history.

The two parties switched their stances on virtually every topic. The party where a county party chair (in a southern state) is called a nigger lover by his opponent, and then loses the election all because he tried to push for a more liberal stance on gay marriage, is the Republican party.

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 6:10 PM

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 5:46 PM

Al in St. Lou on April 4, 2008 at 6:11 PM

War in Iraq would be a prime example of that. Agreed.
freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 5:51 PM

You hate anything concidered Military (doesn’t matter what color or gender that person is) you don’t seem to like or care for the United States, and now you are calling White people racists who haven’t said much if anything?

You make me sick! Why do you live here if you don’t like it?

upinak on April 4, 2008 at 6:12 PM

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 6:10 PM

That crap might fly in the Kos swamps. Everyone knows that the Dixiecrats were as progressive as modern day liberals. Hell, the progressives were for forced sterilization of the “inferior races” and other undesirables.

Use your pathetic pop-history knoweldge all you want, it won’t make you right.

VolMagic on April 4, 2008 at 6:13 PM

McCain’s a good man, for someone to get tortured the way he did, then to forgive them and to talk about the captivity the way he does.. “A million acts of kindness” it’s pretty remarkable..

Chakra Hammer on April 4, 2008 at 6:14 PM

I think that the best way to “reach out” to any community is to have a clear and hopeful message.
The only people who are going to get the black community out of the rut is … the black community. And our free enterprise system. And freedom. We have thrown trillions – not billions – but trillions of dollars down a rathole and until Welfare was reformed – a Republican initiative, by the way, grudgingly signed by Clinton (and opposed by Hillary), the Welfare cycle was unstoppable, and the black family was destroyed.
Going hat in hand and genuflecting to the corrupt horrific monolith of the so-called DNC “leadership” of that community is a no-win situation. Why even try, if all you get is being booed? That’s not very bright or mature, if you ask me.
During all this endless “racial dialogue” crap and self-pity and exploding black criminalization of the past 40 years, millions of poor and working class Asians (including the family of you-know-who) came here, worked hard and succeeded. There is no memorial; to them, nor should there be. There is no “holiday”, but then again, Holidays and Memorials are the touchstones of the Democrats. Point in fact: after 9/11, their whole focus was a pointless argument about a damn Memorial, the stupid bastards.
The best commemorization of any successful People is the happiness and success of their children.
For the black community in this country, it’s time for self-discipline and responsibility, not more pandering and wasted investment of other people’s money.
Holidays, History months, etc., are just crap and produce no benefit to anyone – the very definition of liberal thinking.

TexasJew on April 4, 2008 at 6:15 PM

That crap might fly in the Kos swamps. Everyone knows that the Dixiecrats were as progressive as modern day liberals.

Yes. And they are grandfathers and grandmothers of those in the South who now vote solidly Republican.

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 6:15 PM

And they are grandfathers and grandmothers of those in the South who now vote solidly Republican.

And the grandfathers and grandmothers of those who vote solidly Democrat were racist eugenicists of the highest order. What’s you point?

VolMagic on April 4, 2008 at 6:17 PM

And the grandfathers and grandmothers of those who vote solidly Democrat were racist eugenicists of the highest order.

No. The blue North wasn’t nearly as racist. My point is that every human filth in the South is welcome to the Republican party. And those seriously claim that an entire race within the country is “irrational” are part of those.

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 6:19 PM

Sorry for the multiple posts. Every time I hit submit, Firefox locks up and I have to kill it. I didn’t realize the comments were successfully posted. I guess I’m about to kill the Firefox process again.

Al in St. Lou on April 4, 2008 at 6:20 PM

are a part of that.

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 6:20 PM

I didn’t mean to imply that McCain was wrong to go there (I think that was a brave move on his part), but that the inevitable booing by some in the crowd was immature and not very bright. Of course, the present mainstream black “leadership” in this country is not very smart and absurdly immature. And that’s not even including Obama!

TexasJew on April 4, 2008 at 6:21 PM

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 6:19 PM

This simply shows a lack of knowledge. You subscribe to the pop-history that the South is the only place racism exists. Simply wring. Read up on the Wisconsin Progressives. Please. And tell me, who built NYC?

VolMagic on April 4, 2008 at 6:22 PM

No. The blue North wasn’t nearly as racist. My point is that every human filth in the South is welcome to the Republican party.

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 6:19 PM

So you defend Obama constantly and then say allege tat every racist P.O.S. is welcome into the Republican Party. You don’t actually claim to be a Republican, right?

amerpundit on April 4, 2008 at 6:22 PM

Furthermore, a segment of the population that votes for the party that promotes the single biggest killer of that segment seems to me, at least, to be pretty irrational.

VolMagic on April 4, 2008 at 6:23 PM

OT

Anyone noticing if there is a “redlasso” video … you freeze up?

upinak on April 4, 2008 at 6:27 PM

Hahah…around 1:11-1:1:15 some lady says, “F*** you!”. Classy, and highly ironic!

SouthernGent on April 4, 2008 at 6:27 PM

Here’s HuffPo’s astute take on the event:

Couldn’t McCain Have Asked A White Man To Hold His Umbrella?
Watch: McCain Booed During MLK Speech As Black Man Holds His Umbrella

You can’t make this stuff up.

juliesa on April 4, 2008 at 5:48 PM

Perhaps it was the curator of the museum?

mred on April 4, 2008 at 6:27 PM

So you defend Obama constantly and then say allege tat every racist P.O.S. is welcome into the Republican Party. You don’t actually claim to be a Republican, right?

It’s a lie that I constantly defend Obama. I defended him against two insane accusations:

1) He’s a racist.
2) He’s channeled a minuscule earmark to best school in the country because his wife works there.

I think it’s unquestionable that the Republican party particularly in the South is very tolerant of racists. I’ve seen it myself in the county where I lived for 5 years.

My politics are solidly libertarian. I am not a faithful Republican partisan, no.

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 6:28 PM

Make that right around 1:07-1:10!!

SouthernGent on April 4, 2008 at 6:28 PM

The only one of three invited presidential candidates to accept. He took the body blows and deservingly so, and will be stronger for doing so. That was Presidential.

THE CHOSEN ONE on April 4, 2008 at 6:30 PM

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 6:28 PM

Ahh, anecdotal evidence to support a sweeping hypothesis. Spot on, Ruskie, Spot on.

Once I saw a child molester who was gay. Thus, all gay people are child molesters. See how that works?

VolMagic on April 4, 2008 at 6:33 PM

Spot on, Ruskie, Spot on.

LOL. Just talk, please.

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 6:35 PM

I’ve seen it myself in the county where I lived for 5 years.

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 6:28 PM

So you’re making a generalization based on what you’ve seen in your county. Did you happen to know anyone who voted for Nixon?

Again, Byrd. People tend to ignore that point.

amerpundit on April 4, 2008 at 6:35 PM

free, chew on this (this will be fun folks)

Life and Times of Obama X (updated):

Closest People in His Life (“These people are a part of me”):
Wife, Michele: “Really proud of my country for first time in my adult life” (at age 44)
Pastor, Rev. Wright: God Dxxx America, US of KKKA (“I can no more disown him than I can my white grandmother “)
Mom: Atheist, Communist
Dad: foreign Arab Sunni Muslim
Brother, Roy (now Abongo): devout Muslim “He converted to Islam, and has sworn off pork and tobacco and alcohol.” the black man must “liberate himself from the poisoning influences of European culture ”
Step dad: foreign, devout Muslim
Grandma: “on more than one occasion has uttered racial or ethnic stereotypes that made me cringe”
Cousin Odinga: involved in killings of hundreds in Kenya after saying his election was “stolen”. Plus signed pledge to, within 6 months, re-write the Constitution to implement Sharia law.

Background:
Military Experience: none
National Guard experience: none
Senate Foreign Relations Committee meetings held: none
Education: 2 years in a Muslim school, the rest in elite private schools
Church: Racist, Black Separatist
Patriotism: Refuses to wear flag pin, randomly takes hand to heart during Anthem, Declaration of Independence is “stained by this nation’s original sin of slavery”
Drug Preference: Marijuana, liquor and coke “Pot had helped, and booze; maybe a little blow ”
Music Preference: The Muslim call to prayer is “one of the prettiest sounds on Earth.”
Photo Preference: Somali Muslim garb (think Blackhawk Down)
Boyhood Memories:In an interview with Nicholas Kristof, published in The New York Times, Obama recited the Muslim call to prayer, the Adhan, “with a first-class [Arabic] accent.”
Question: According to Islamic scholars, reciting the Shahada (the first 5 lines of the Adhan), the Muslim declaration of faith, makes one a Muslim.

faraway on April 4, 2008 at 6:36 PM

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 6:35 PM

Talk about how distorted your view of hisotry is? Ruskie?

VolMagic on April 4, 2008 at 6:37 PM

free is a South bigot (it’s like being a racist)

faraway on April 4, 2008 at 6:38 PM

Update (IC): Agreed, although there is nothing better than the dialogue that I had today with the Chinese buffet.

Indy Conservative on April 4, 2008 at 6:38 PM

A courageous move by McCain; also necessary to his presidential aspirations. His opposition to a federal MLK holiday would’ve turned into an election issue. It probably will still come up, but now any coverage of the issue will have to include the footage of McCain doing the right thing.

RightOFLeft on April 4, 2008 at 6:40 PM

freevillage has a very distorted history of what happened to the white vote since 1960. But don’t take my word for it. Read it at the HuffPo. Yes, really.

Karl on April 4, 2008 at 6:41 PM

faraway on April 4, 2008 at 6:38 PM

I don’t think free lives or is from “Our” country!

upinak on April 4, 2008 at 6:46 PM

Until black voters stop believing that Republicans are racist, there’s no point in outreach.

Enrique on April 4, 2008 at 5:40 PM

Sure you can. Little by little it can work.
I wouldn’t write them off, I would try to attract them just as I would try to attract any other voter.
Go in their neighborhoods, give it a shot, who knows, over time it just might work.

freevillage is definitely a kos kiddie.
I spend time over there and he is spouting the line verbatim:

The two parties switched their stances on virtually every topic

This garbage will fly here with the local kooks. Don’t expect it get any traction outside in the real world.

That is too funny freevillage!
Go back to your fellow kooks on kos.

ArmyAunt on April 4, 2008 at 6:51 PM

Go back to your fellow kooks on kos.

Why? I don’t want you to be my enemy kook. Please be my fellow kook, too.

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 6:53 PM

freevillage do you live in America?

ArmyAunt on April 4, 2008 at 6:59 PM

in a perfect blog world, there would be a ignore feature!

upinak on April 4, 2008 at 6:59 PM

Doesn’t matter. In politics, good intentions are always more important than outcomes.

Enrique on April 4, 2008 at 5:47 PM

The road to hell is paved with good intentions.

Entelechy on April 4, 2008 at 7:01 PM

freevillage do you live in America?

Yes.

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 7:02 PM

I have long argued that Republicans need to reach out to African-American voters,

You mean reaching out in ways that don’t involve singing Baha Men’s “Who Let the Dog’s Out?”, right?

malan89 on April 4, 2008 at 7:03 PM

free lives in GD America:)

faraway on April 4, 2008 at 7:04 PM

Here is a link to an Dr. Thomas Sowell interview. He talks about black issues about 24 minutes in. If you have the 35 minutes to watch or listen it is worth the time to hear what I think is one of the most brilliant minds of our times. Here it is.

Wade on April 4, 2008 at 7:09 PM

Well you can thank my nephew that you live in a country where you can say what you like and be able to argue your point.
Calling other Americans racists in a blanket statement is wrong.
Why did you move here if you hate it so much.

ArmyAunt on April 4, 2008 at 7:12 PM

Well you can thank my nephew that you live in a country where you can say what you like and be able to argue your point.
Calling other Americans racists in a blanket statement is wrong.
Why did you move here if you hate it so much.

I appreciate his service although of course he’s not the only one who enables everyone to live in a free country. The military does its part, the ACLU does its part. Most people are involved in one way or the other.

Your own fairly transparent attempts to take personal credit for your nephew’s sacrifices look kinda disgusting, though. That’s common though. People who help others most tend to be modest. Whereas those who do nothing themselves run around demanding thanks for others’ deeds.

And I don’t live “here”. I would if I moved into your home. I live “there” where there’s no you and where (perhaps in part for that reason) I like it a lot.

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 7:23 PM

ArmyAunt on April 4, 2008 at 7:12 PM

You may not want to bother with free saying anything to your Nephew. Free does not like Troops or OIF or OEF. I found this out yesterday. Look at Oily Obama, if you aren’t sure about where Free stands.

upinak on April 4, 2008 at 7:23 PM

Why? I don’t want you to be my enemy kook. Please be my fellow kook, too.

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 6:53 PM

Sorry comrade, but no thanks.

4shoes on April 4, 2008 at 7:26 PM

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 7:23 PM

God help you if you are ever in a disaster and no National Guard ever help you or your family. Or any other good will organization.

upinak on April 4, 2008 at 7:27 PM

God help you if you are ever in a disaster and no National Guard ever help you or your family.

Because they are all in Iraq on the 14th tour?

P.S. There is no God.

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 7:30 PM

The blacks do not buy into the Republican policies because they have “put out some effort” to make Republican policies work. How do you suggest the Republicans can can make a case when the choir they are preaching to expects to achieve equality without effort?

“The blacks” are not some monolithic mass of rappers and Malcolm X’s. They are individuals, and as such, many do not fit any mold you care to envision for them. Many work forty hours a week for the corporation and own a home in the suburbs where they keep their lawn mowed on the weekends and worry about their kids. Some even break into the upper echelons and get all of the perks (and stress) that goes with it. By reaching out to those, and to the rest, we send a message that we want them to grab the American dream. We want them to be successful and hard-working and to enjoy the good life that America offers. They are welcome. That isn’t pandering, but it’s a powerful message, and every time it is well-delivered, it makes an impression.

Oh, and freevillage, you’re as despicable a racist as I’ve ever seen, classifying all southern whites as “filth”. Do you talk that way at church and PTA meetings too? The internet may protect you from paying the consequences of your behavior, but it doesn’t diminish the sin.

Immolate on April 4, 2008 at 7:33 PM

classifying all southern whites as “filth”.

Show me.

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 7:36 PM

If all they did was boo,, no big deal.

JellyToast on April 4, 2008 at 7:37 PM

My point is that every human filth in the South is welcome to the Republican party.

Immolate on April 4, 2008 at 7:38 PM

John McCain walks into a face-to-face encounter with black voters in Memphis and makes his case, apologizes and unltimately scores a point or two with an otherwise predisposed adversarial crowd.

Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton refuse to face questions from Brit Hume, Wendell Goler and Chris Matthews in a structured debate.

Do the math.

D2Boston on April 4, 2008 at 7:40 PM

My point is that every human filth in the South is welcome to the Republican party.

So? I know I am not a native speaker. Are you?

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 7:40 PM

Your own fairly transparent attempts to take personal credit for your nephew’s sacrifices look kinda disgusting, though. That’s common though. People who help others most tend to be modest. Whereas those who do nothing themselves run around demanding thanks for others’ deeds.

And I don’t live “here”. I would if I moved into your home. I live “there” where there’s no you and where (perhaps in part for that reason) I like it a lot.

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 7:23 PM

You know what free village…fu@k you!
I am not taking credit for anything he has done!
But you are BENEFITTING from his service and you are not fit to lick the mud from his boots!
Do not respond to me, you disgust me and you are only on here to cause dissent.

ArmyAunt on April 4, 2008 at 7:45 PM

You may not want to bother with free saying anything to your Nephew. Free does not like Troops or OIF or OEF. I found this out yesterday. Look at Oily Obama, if you aren’t sure about where Free stands.

upinak on April 4, 2008 at 7:23 PM

He couldn’t anyway, he was killed in the Iraq war.

ArmyAunt on April 4, 2008 at 7:47 PM

So? I know I am not a native speaker. Are you?

I think you’ve hit upon an even better defense than “I was quoted out of context”. So I am not to take your arguments literally? Give you a little wiggle room because your’e from Sweden? Oi.

Immolate on April 4, 2008 at 7:47 PM

So? I know I am not a native speaker. Are you?

freevillage on April 4, 2008 at 7:40 PM

Please, give me a break, you speak better than some natives here, don’t use that as an excuse for being an inciting ass.

4shoes on April 4, 2008 at 7:47 PM

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