Interviewer to Mohammed cartoonist: Do you regret it?

posted at 3:52 pm on February 29, 2008 by Allahpundit

Part three of three; numbers one and two are here but you’re better off with this profile at Spiegel, which more fully captures his anguish (“We’d probably be the safest in a prison cell”). It’s Kurt Westergaard, formerly an anonymous political cartoonist at Jyllands-Posten, lately the creator of one of the post-9/11 world’s canonical images and most recently the target of a jihadist murder plot that left him homeless. Was it worth it? The answer lies at the end of the clip. He’s trying to make it worthwhile in another way, too, although the prospect of some degenerate Saudi royal dropping a few million in blood money on him to buy the drawing and burn it is almost too much to bear. His wife seems to think that would be kosher; Westergaard, to his credit, is resisting. Any right-wing billionaires in the audience want to take this thing off his hands and give it to a museum, where it belongs?


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When asked how he would feel if he met one of the released terrorists on the street he said something to the effect that he puts his trust in the legal system. He’s a better man then I am. I’d rather put my trust in a firearm when dealing with these fanatics.

TooTall on February 29, 2008 at 4:04 PM

I got your regret right here.

RobCon on February 29, 2008 at 4:08 PM

God, bless him and keep him safe.

tickleddragon on February 29, 2008 at 4:09 PM

Interviewer: Now we have heard that this drawing you made in one way or another, has cost about a hundred people their lives in connection with the Mohammed Crises…

Great, just great. Blame the cartoon and not the nutjobs who want to murder over a freakin’ cartoon.

trubble on February 29, 2008 at 4:10 PM

Pisses off Muslims AND has the b__s to wear a pink ascot/scarf thing! My new favorite artsy-Westerner!

emailnuevo on February 29, 2008 at 4:12 PM

Great, just great. Blame the cartoon and not the nutjobs who want to murder over a freakin’ cartoon.

Absolutely.

Hopefully King Theoden here stays safe.

wise_man on February 29, 2008 at 4:14 PM

Good luck Mr. Westergaard… stay safe.

Califemme on February 29, 2008 at 4:21 PM

Interviewer: Now we have heard that this drawing you made in one way or another, has cost about a hundred people their lives in connection with the Mohammed Crises…

Cartoons don’t kill people. Crazy Muslims overreacting to cartoons kill people.

AZCoyote on February 29, 2008 at 4:21 PM

To hell with Muhom-ad!

colep on February 29, 2008 at 4:22 PM

He’s a transitional figure; a man who, in a very intimate and personal way, understands the threat that he, his family and by extension all of Europe faces. Yet he’s still trapped in the old way of thinking. As he said, “There are two aspects, the preventative aspect, the other is the inspiring of respect.” Poor fellow. He still believes that his enemies, delerious with blood-lust, can be convince to change into nice, polite Danes. He’s frightened enough to know the threat of murder is very real yet he still thinks the old European, multi-culti platitudes (respect, tolerance, etc.) have meaning:

I doubt his generation in Europe will ever turn the corner and appreciate the abyss of hatred the jihadists feel for them. Nothing, no attack, no atrocity, not even the clear and blantant threats of personal, hand-to-hand murder, will fundamentally change their world-view. This ’1968′ generation will never acknowledge that there is an implacable enemy of all they hold dear. They will go to their graves clinging to the old slogans, like the once-sacred liturgy of a dead religion.

As I said, he’s a transitional figure. It’s an open question whether this is a transition into dhimmitude or resistance, whether the next generation will retreat deeper into the failed ideologies of the post-war years or revive the spirit of their more distant forefathers and actively resist the colonization of their homelands and the erasure of their cultures.

Vote Sauron 08 on February 29, 2008 at 4:24 PM

Hopefully King Theoden here stays safe.

wise_man on February 29, 2008 at 4:14 PM

Yeah, I thought he looked a little familiar…

“Perhaps your hand would better remember its old strength if it held your sword again?”

Frozen Tex on February 29, 2008 at 4:30 PM

A man of principle. God Bless you Kurt Westergaard.

I especially liked how he said that there would be a confrontation at some point. He seems willing to be a figure in this struggled to reconcile Islam with secular countries. For this he deserves great regard.

FLcapitalistthug on February 29, 2008 at 4:49 PM

Thank God for men like Kurt Wetergaard.

brtex on February 29, 2008 at 5:11 PM

Was it worth it? Yes. This man is what heroes are made of. He did what needed to be done when others were too afraid.

Connie on February 29, 2008 at 5:20 PM

Mr. Westergaard is heroic and brave unlike the dumb MSM hacks here in the U.S.

jencab on February 29, 2008 at 5:27 PM

Any right-wing billionaires in the audience want to take this thing off his hands and give it to a museum, where it belongs?

How about Left wing billionaire George Soros. Doesn’t he run something called The Open Society Institute?

The next thing I’d like to see is a street or 2 (or maybe even hundreds) named after Kurt Westergaard. Maybe it could start in France, where they could rename Rue Mumia Abu-Jamal, in St. Denis.

I know, I’m dreaming.

Buy Danish on February 29, 2008 at 5:56 PM

He is torn. He used to believe in the Danish legal system, but now he’s not so sure. He is transitional and he may become a martyr. You can see he’s thinking those things as he’s being questioned. He personifies the struggle of what remains of western civilization against its biggest threat: Islamofascism. He’s like a British Jew listening to Chamberlain as he waved the paper Hitler signed when returning to Britain and announced: “Peace in our time!” Kurt Wetergaard knows intuitively there won’t be peace in our time. Quite the contrary. He knows that if his cartoon didn’t precipitate a fatwa, it would have been something else, because what he and the rest of the Danes, and the rest of western culture face is a struggle against Radical Islam.

Or, is it a struggle against Islam itself? Is it just another chapter in a book that was put down, upside down, under Europe’s bed three hundred years ago when the Muslim siege of Vienna failed?

What Kurt Wetergaard knows, almost unconsciously, is that what he faces is another siege by another means. He also knows that his fellow Danes, his fellow Europeans, his fellow westerners are in denial. Like Theo Van Gogh, Wetergaard may suffer a violent death at the hands of Islamofascists which may wake the west up or it may not. Either way, he’ll still be dead. That’s what he’s pondering while his vacuous interviewer ends the show, telling his audience that another interesting guest will appear in Kurt’s chair next week. Kurt, meanwhile, will be looking over his shoulder for the rest of his life.

Tom McLaughlin on February 29, 2008 at 8:16 PM

People worldwide should be able to send a buck or three to a “KURT’S ART-TOON FUND” to provide him just compensation (for all of the fortune in royalties he’s lost) to buy the drawing in order to donate the original artwork to the Danish Royal Library, which wants to preserve it.

Michelle? Allahpundit? Capt. Ed?

This site would be a good place to start such a FUND.

Link it to Paypal and credit cards so that Kurt W. can afford some safety.

Set it up, and I’ll be among the first to throw in a C-note.

profitsbeard on February 29, 2008 at 10:02 PM

No regrets.

Why should he? His drawing did not kill, or even threaten, anyone; nutjob Islamists did.

That said, I’d be packin’ anytime, anywhere.

“Perhaps your hand would better remember its old strength if it held your sword again?”

Proving the pen mightier than the sword? He’s got courage; more than alot of their politicians.

IrishEyes on February 29, 2008 at 10:58 PM

Well said IrishEyes. Stay strong Kurt the world needs more men like you.

limowilliam on February 29, 2008 at 11:16 PM

As I said, he’s a transitional figure. It’s an open question whether this is a transition into dhimmitude or resistance, whether the next generation will retreat deeper into the failed ideologies of the post-war years or revive the spirit of their more distant forefathers and actively resist the colonization of their homelands and the erasure of their cultures.

Vote Sauron 08 on February 29, 2008 at 4:24 PM

Well put

The big question for all Western nations: where did we leave our definitions of what we are?

The West had definitions at one time. we threw them out and forgot to replace them with a proven system. The new systems, imagined to be perfect, are now being tested by others who have no intention of living under those rules because they bring their nation of islam with them where ever they settle.

The West decided to pretend it was not a nation within a nation.

The West also decided to pretend that our newly created utopias actually worked as well as the old systems tested in war and peace.

As a Christian I believe the weakness of the West occurred when they abandoned respect for the faiths of the West, Judaism, Christianity and other world religions with similar moral constructs.

entagor on March 1, 2008 at 12:39 PM

So not surprisingly, the video is no longer available on YouTube. Must have been too offensive.

a097005 on March 1, 2008 at 4:38 PM

a097005 on March 1, 2008 at 4:38 PM

Yeah we don’t wanna offend any rag heads or left wing globalists

oldernslower on March 1, 2008 at 5:14 PM