Video: Yes, We Can (Reagan Remix)

posted at 12:13 pm on February 13, 2008 by Bryan

I don’t know about you, but between the populism, defeatism, socialism and creeping fascism on display in US politics these days, I need a dose of the Gipper. Here’s one. It’s muuuuuch better than that will.i.am video revolution piece.

By the way, check out the video’s host, Eyeblast. It’s a new video sharing site brought to you by the great people at the Media Research Center.


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Comments

Dude. I miss that man…he will always be my archetypical image of “President.”

Tim on February 13, 2008 at 12:20 PM

See the problem people are conjuring is seeing Obama and McCain side by side giving speaches. Other than debates that doesnt happen. McCain just has to hold his own then and not seem too old.

The rest of the time is a media campaign. In that McCain can get some top republican help and put out a very good message. It will be dueling ads not head to head speaches that play a big part in an election.

BTW why does everyone assume that Obama isnt gafe prone as well as McCain ? I have seen several mistakes (Like the tornado death toll one and the non use of the hands in the pledge picture) ?

Would be good for McCain to super impose himself speaking with touting reagan’s message in parallel messages. The Gipper was terrific in givng speaches and there is a lot there to go for.

William Amos on February 13, 2008 at 12:20 PM

Take your kids to the Reagan Library ASAP before their generation is totally lost.

Godspeed, Mr. Reagan

Valiant on February 13, 2008 at 12:23 PM

Freedom. There’s a word the Dems haven’t been putting to use much lately. If McCain is smart, he’ll pick up on that, since it’s one area in which he can speak with some authority (yeah, yeah, I know about McCain-Feingold, but the general non-activist public doesn’t care about that.) He already picked up on the vacuousness of Obama’s hope rhetoric, stating that he knows a little about hope himself. I think he could end up giving either of the Dem candidates a good run in November.

Big S on February 13, 2008 at 12:23 PM

McCain a lukewarm compromiser……no amount of gafe’s can fix that…it’s like …ummm…Slick Willy Clinton and his Misses…thieves…you can’t change it because there’s a record of it…
for McCain it’s a anti-constitutional POLICY(s) that’s always there to remind us.

They can’t paint McCain in a Reagan face, he can even regurgitate a Reagan speech, but he has a proven track record vindictiveness and traitorism…

end of story

TOPV on February 13, 2008 at 12:26 PM

I’m weeping on my couch during my lunch hour. I couldn’t have spent this hour any better! Thank you for posting this!

SouthernGent on February 13, 2008 at 12:26 PM

*tear*

I don’t know what it is, but every time I hear Reagan speak, I well-up a little. A great, great man.

JetBoy on February 13, 2008 at 12:27 PM

He meant every word. It wasn’t just rhetoric to him, just lines on a page. The Spirit of ’76 was strong in his heart, and it affected his whole tenure in office. Oh, how I miss him.

spmat on February 13, 2008 at 12:27 PM

Unfortunately, this is the type of message Barack Obama is giving. McCain’s problem isn’t getting HIMSELF fired up… he needs to get US fired up.

Texas Rainmaker on February 13, 2008 at 12:27 PM

Spoke like a libertarian, acted like a Republican.

FierceGuppy on February 13, 2008 at 12:28 PM

I love that man!

spacekicker on February 13, 2008 at 12:31 PM

Reagan is/was a great man. There will never be another like him.

With that said, McCain and Obama are not the men nor even close to the men that R.R. was.They both stumble over their words, go off on another tangent, speak out of both sides of their mouth and that is just what their speech writers are giving them.

Freedom is something most, even in here, can not comprehend. Sacrifice, Longing, Hunger, Pity, Honor, Respect and Freedom has been lost on many generations now and is coming back very soon. Maybe not in that order, but close enough. Then people may look back on all they did, the people they voted in, the BS that was said and at times done …. and wonder if they would have been different or if they had done it another way, would it still be the way it was.

I feel sorry for many of the liberals who are soon coming to this conclussion and facing this reality.

upinak on February 13, 2008 at 12:35 PM

Funny! I remember watching that speech but don’t recall that stupid guitar in the background droning on incessantly!

Dread Pirate Roberts VI on February 13, 2008 at 12:37 PM

Just what I needed today. Thanks Bryan for posting this and thank for the tip on the video hosting site :-)

SN

realVerse on February 13, 2008 at 12:38 PM

Obama is far from the only who often speaks in platitudes. That video shows why. They’re damn effective, and, in the right hands, they can be damn inspirational.

Yoosaion on February 13, 2008 at 12:39 PM

Obama is far from the only who often speaks in platitudes. That video shows why. They’re damn effective, and, in the right hands, they can be damn inspirational.

Yoosaion on February 13, 2008 at 12:39 PM

Reagan spoke of his philosphy of why lesser government is better.

All Obama says is “Hope” and “Change” and that is a much more nuaced stance

William Amos on February 13, 2008 at 12:40 PM

We miss you, Ronald.

I don’t know what it is, but every time I hear Reagan speak, I well-up a little. A great, great man.

JetBoy on February 13, 2008 at 12:27 PM

I get that, too. I call it “love of country.”

emailnuevo on February 13, 2008 at 12:42 PM

I love this video, for some great clips of him:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HDRA3XFfDr4

MadisonConservative on February 13, 2008 at 12:42 PM

I love that man.

robblefarian on February 13, 2008 at 12:49 PM

Ronald Reagan wrote his own speeches, he didn’t just read someone else’s words from a teleprompter. Just like Fred Thompson. I am so sad that Fred didn’t have the same charisma RR had. :(

ihasurnominashun on February 13, 2008 at 12:50 PM

McCain last night, with his own version of ‘Yes, We Can!’:

The work we face in our time is great, but our opportunities greater still. In a time of war, and the terrible sacrifices it entails, the promise of a better future is not always clear. But I promise you, my friends, we face no enemy, no matter how cruel; and no challenge, no matter how daunting, greater than the courage, patriotism and determination of Americans. We are the makers of history, not its victims.

Hope, my friends, is a powerful thing. I can attest to that better than many, for I have seen men’s hopes tested in hard and cruel ways that few will ever experience. And I stood astonished at the resilience of their hope in the darkest of hours because it did not reside in an exaggerated belief in their individual strength, but in the support of their comrades, and their faith in their country.

My hope for our country resides in my faith in the American character, the character which proudly defends the right to think and do for ourselves, but perceives self-interest in accord with a kinship of ideals, which, when called upon, Americans will defend with their very lives.

To encourage a country with only rhetoric rather than sound and proven ideas that trust in the strength and courage of free people is not a promise of hope. It is a platitude.

Not bad.

Big S on February 13, 2008 at 12:54 PM

When some leaders of the labor unions were asked why they supported Reagan. Their reponse was “he makes you proud to be an American. You just have to walk tall.”

volsense on February 13, 2008 at 12:55 PM

Ronald Reagan wrote his own speeches, he didn’t just read someone else’s words from a teleprompter.

What were Peggy Noonan and the rest of the ‘Reagan Speechwriters’ doing, then? I’m afraid you’ve been misinformed.

Big S on February 13, 2008 at 12:56 PM

The difference between Ronny and most of the people repeating his talking points today, is that he truly meant them. These weren’t politically opportune stances he uttered to win over the populist vote. They were convictions he held even if they were unpopular.

49 states, 525 electoral votes, 59% of the popular vote. Lost Mondale’s own home state by just 3800 votes. When he stuck to his true conservative principles.

amerpundit on February 13, 2008 at 12:57 PM

I miss Reagan too.

It’s a damn shame we have the anti-Republican as our nominee. It was once an honor to be a Republican. It won’t be anymore.

CABE on February 13, 2008 at 12:57 PM

Inspiring !
BTW; I still haven’t been about to watch the entire will.i.am video
It just sucks, badly

Kini on February 13, 2008 at 1:02 PM

ihasurnominashun on February 13, 2008 at 12:50 PM

Really? Interesting because I know for a fact that R.R. didn’t write all his speeches. He may have had a hand in them during the process, but for what it is worth… there is a reason why he had the writers around.

upinak on February 13, 2008 at 1:03 PM

now that is how you give a speech.

his ability to actually understand political philosophy, communicate it and not be a complete fruitcake hardliner about it at the same time, combined with his amazing political skills….is Lightening in a bottle.

jp on February 13, 2008 at 1:04 PM

What speech is that?

Bad Penny on February 13, 2008 at 1:06 PM

I wasn’t even 10 years old when he left office, and yet I teared up when he passed.

Too many in my generation have followed the likes of Che, and read Marx rather than the Federalist Papers. Too many either didn’t know Reagen or hated him out of their own ignorance.

I’m proud to have the same ideals that Reagen had, and I intend to keep those ideals. He was a great man and really understood he was leading a great country, that the Presidency was much bigger than himself.

Thanks, Bryan, for posting this.

conservativejack on February 13, 2008 at 1:09 PM

[Reagan] meant every word. It wasn’t just rhetoric to him, just lines on a page. The Spirit of ‘76 was strong in his heart, and it affected his whole tenure in office. Oh, how I miss him.
spmat on February 13, 2008 at 12:27 PM

When he was younger, Ronald Reagan used to drive to whoever would pay his travel expenses – Rotary Clubs, Women’s Auxiliaries, etc. – to give speeches just like this one.

If it were up to him, he might have spent his whole life doing that. In his later years, Reagan would admit he never would have amounted to anything if it weren’t for Nancy steering him away from the smaller venues and driving him on to bigger things.

But that man loved America since the day he was born. And he spent every moment of his life doing everything in his power to share that love with the rest of us.

Thank God for Ronald Reagan. This country is full of great Americans, but when will we see another of them reach national prominence as a politician? Probably not in our lifetimes.

logis on February 13, 2008 at 1:09 PM

upinak on February 13, 2008 at 1:03 PM

That’s right. Noonan wrote “the Boys of Pointe du Hoc” and the Challenger address, and I think Peter Robinson wrote the “tear down this wall” speech. I’m sure there are others who wrote some of his other famous speeches as well.

Big S on February 13, 2008 at 1:14 PM

McCain last night, with his own version of ‘Yes, We Can!’:
…Not bad.
Big S on February 13, 2008 at 12:54 PM

Well, it’s definitely not good by any stretch of the imagination.

America has more “character” than our enemies? Dude, that isn’t what made the Soviet Union and Al Qaeda
“evil.” And it’s not what made America great.

Socialism and nationalism isn’t one whit better than Socialism and pacifism. Both paths lead to only one place; and that’s sure as Hell not where I want to go.

logis on February 13, 2008 at 1:19 PM

Big S on February 13, 2008 at 12:56 PM

upinak on February 13, 2008 at 1:03 PM

Hmm, I had always thought he wrote his own speeches. Thanks for enlightening me.

ihasurnominashun on February 13, 2008 at 1:20 PM

Yeah…. McCain’s synchophants claim he is just like Ronald Reagan. Clips like this prove just how much of a liar McCain and his people are. Gutless toads.

There’s no limit to what a man can do or where he can go if he doesn’t mind who gets the credit….. Ronald Reagan.

Shut up and support me damnit! Don’t you know I was a POW? I got the most delegates and I know who ate the strawberries! You better just hold your nose and vote for me even though I despise you people and everything you stand for but I’m fired up and you better support me damnit! Where else you going to go?….. John McCain every time the gutless toad gets in front of a microphone.

highhopes on February 13, 2008 at 1:22 PM

That’s right. Noonan wrote “the Boys of Pointe du Hoc” and the Challenger address, and I think Peter Robinson wrote the “tear down this wall” speech. I’m sure there are others who wrote some of his other famous speeches as well.
Big S on February 13, 2008 at 1:14 PM

Believe it or not, that’s actually a good example. Noonan was a bit of a self-aggrandizing twit, but Robinson makes no bones about the fact that Reagan shoved the “tear down this wall” speech past the most strenuous objections of all his advisers.

And, as you point out, the libtards have been attacking Reagan as an “mindless puppet” for decades now. And they probably always will.

logis on February 13, 2008 at 1:24 PM

America has more “character” than our enemies? Dude, that isn’t what made the Soviet Union and Al Qaeda
“evil.” And it’s not what made America great.

That’s not what he’s saying. Read it again. He’s actually paraphrasing a lot of what Reagan says in the speech Bryan posted above.

Big S on February 13, 2008 at 1:26 PM

I wonder if I could run for President and just quote Reagan during the entire campaign. Then I realized that anyone can. It is the far harder road to adhere to the ideals he set down. He is still the greatest public speaking President in the modern age. Here’s to you, Gipper.

Spc Steve on February 13, 2008 at 1:26 PM

Robinson makes no bones about the fact that Reagan shoved the “tear down this wall” speech past the most strenuous objections of all his advisers.

Robinson and the other speechwriters actually wanted the “tear down this wall” line; it was the State Department (imagine that!) that wanted to remove the line. Reagan sided with his speechwriters, who had been to Germany to scout out the venue and audience, and realized that the line would resonate on both sides of the Berlin Wall.

Big S on February 13, 2008 at 1:28 PM

Tears here too.

Boy, do we need a Ronald Reagan, now more than ever.

rightside on February 13, 2008 at 1:33 PM

You better just hold your nose and vote for me even though I despise you people and everything you stand for but I’m fired up and you better support me damnit! Where else you going to go?….. John McCain every time the gutless toad gets in front of a microphone.
highhopes on February 13, 2008 at 1:22 PM

Remembering Ronald Reagan makes me feel proud and happy…. It’s thinking about stuff like this that makes me want to cry.

Reagan used to LEAD us; McCain (like Bush and Bush before him) just keeps whining that we need to support him, because we don’t have a choice.

Well, guess what? As long as we keep propping up these jackasses we won’t EVER have a choice.

logis on February 13, 2008 at 1:33 PM

By the way, check out the video’s host, Eyeblast. It’s a new video sharing site brought to you by the great people at the Media Research Center.

Another one? It’s getting to be too many placed to have to repost your stuff.

QubeTV is still a place to find some decent stuff.

http://www.qubetv.tv/videos/detail/213

Hiney Von Pewps on February 13, 2008 at 1:45 PM

McCain last night, with his own version of ‘Yes, We Can!’:
…Not bad.
Big S on February 13, 2008 at 12:54 PM

Except for the fact that you KNEW Reagan meant and believed what he was saying. With McCain, your guess is as good as anyone else’s as to whether he does or not.

Kowboy on February 13, 2008 at 1:47 PM

Listening to Reagan again gives me gooseflesh. He’s the President of my childhood.
A fitting cliche’ comes to mind: You don’t know what you’ve got until it’s gone.

Geronimo on February 13, 2008 at 1:48 PM

The Gipper was indeed one of the greats. It’s hard to believe that we can’t find even one politician today who comes close to Reagan’s view of government. Whenever we come close, the MSM and elites in Washington destroy them. I’m convinced that someday another Gipper will come along and fix this country’s government. Maybe it will be someone like Bobby Jindal.

orlandocajun on February 13, 2008 at 1:51 PM

RIP Reagan, you are missed. The best President of the last century, no contest.

Voidseeker on February 13, 2008 at 2:07 PM

Excellent! And he believed every word and tried to act on these principles as often as possible. Sure, he had speech writers, and they did great work, but the speeches reflect his thoughts and beliefs. I never feel like Reagan is trying to say what he thinks the public wants to hear or covering for what he really believes.

Thanks, Bryan

TX Mom on February 13, 2008 at 2:13 PM

Bad Penny on February 13, 2008 at 1:06 PM

I think it is the first inaugural. Anyone else know for sure?

TX Mom on February 13, 2008 at 2:14 PM

Wonderful. Thanks, Bryan.

Spirit of 1776 on February 13, 2008 at 2:18 PM

“Wherever politics tries to be redemptive, it is promising too much. Where it wishes to do the work of God, it becomes not divine, but demonic.” Pope Benedict XVI
From one of the latest articles at American Thinker. On Obama.

Or learn about the fallacy of liberation theology- a blend of Marxism and Christianity. An ill philosophy Obama’s pastor in Chicago believes in. One that JPII condemned.

Many or the left especially the young have no idea of what’s being offered to them is a redress of Marxism and Socialism.

Pray for this country,and I mean alot!

Irenaeus on February 13, 2008 at 2:25 PM

That video was an inhaler for the proverbial asthma that is the current political scene.

Uh, don’t mind that comment.

OneGyT on February 13, 2008 at 2:28 PM

Okay, I know where I got the idea that RR wrote his own speeches…from this book:

Reagan, in His Own Hand: Ronald Reagan’s Writings That Reveal His Revolutionary Vision for America

Michael Deaver and Ed Meese, his two top advisers since the mid-1960s, both confirm the same story. In addition to the broadcasts, Ed Meese remembers that he wrote many of his own speeches, at home on weekends. “He would come in on Monday morning with six, eight, or ten pages from his legal pad, all in his own handwriting. One day we found him in his office checking the typed copy of one of his speeches against his written copy to make sure it was accurate, and then he took the written pages, tore them up and put them in the wastebasket. I’m afraid a lot of his handwritten documents ended up that way.”

The review even indicates that it’s possible that Reagan wrote “A time for choosing”.

I have to be honest….people don’t like lazy Fred!, but he is made of the same stuff that made Reagan soooo awesome.

ihasurnominashun on February 13, 2008 at 2:30 PM

“…we can and will resolve the problems which now confront us. And after all, why shouldn’t we believe that? WE are Americans.”

The message of hope and belief in self in that closing two sentences is sooo much better than that of the socialist cause that calls for gubmint to “solve” our problems. Is there anybody out there with that message?

RWLA on February 13, 2008 at 2:43 PM

Reagan always made people feel proud to be Americans and optimistic about the future. In contrast, the modern Democrat Party works as hard as it can to make people feel ashamed to be Americans–ashamed of our power, ashamed of our success, ashamed of defending ourselves, ashamed in almost every way. That’s the core difference between the parties’ philosophies, in my opinion. Or at least it used to be.

aero on February 13, 2008 at 2:50 PM

You notice that Pres Reagan did not waste his time trying to say who is and who is not a conservative. He believed in Americans and America, in limited government, in strong national defense and in liberty.

georgealbert on February 13, 2008 at 3:32 PM

Okay, I know where I got the idea that RR wrote his own speeches…from this book: Reagan, in His Own Hand: Ronald Reagan’s Writings That Reveal His Revolutionary Vision for America. Michael Deaver and Ed Meese, his two top advisers since the mid-1960s, both confirm the same story….
ihasurnominashun on February 13, 2008 at 2:30 PM

Doesn’t matter either way. The facts are always going to be irrelevant to the libtards. They’ve invested way too much emotional capital into their meme of Reagan as idiot-savant to ever let it go.

Besides; of course it’s idiotic to dither that Reagan’s hands didn’t type the letters onto a keyboard. The bottom line is that Reagan always had a coherent vision of American government’s limited role in our lives, and of America’s limitless role in the destiny of the world. And he always expressed that vision with crystal clarity.

And that puts Ronald Reagan worlds above the pathetic field we’re looking at today.

logis on February 13, 2008 at 3:39 PM

Dude. I miss that man…he will always be my archetypical image of “President.”

Tim on February 13, 2008 at 12:20 PM Dude.

I’m with you brother. I remember when he died I wore a black morning band on my badge even though the department did not authorize it. A sergeant told me he could make me take it off by my captain, God bless her, said she believed everyone should be wearing one. Shut the sarge up really quick.

srhoades on February 13, 2008 at 3:56 PM

I never appreciated him when I was young; I foolishly thought all Americans loved America the way that he and I do.

Wonder what he would have thought of this, speaking of creeping fascism:

Messiah to Food Store: Build it Here (or else?)

PattyJ on February 13, 2008 at 4:13 PM

Believe it or not, that’s actually a good example. Noonan was a bit of a self-aggrandizing twit, but Robinson makes no bones about the fact that Reagan shoved the “tear down this wall” speech past the most strenuous objections of all his advisers.

Thank you for bringing that up. Reagan was indeed advised by just about everybody to take out the “tear down this wall” line from that speech, arguing that it was too provacative.

Reagan stuck firmly to his guns and gave the speech as he wanted to do it. The rest, they say, is history.

It’s a shining example of sticking to your principles instead of giving in for convenience or consensus, and one that conservatives and the GOP really need to remember in these depressing times.

thirteen28 on February 13, 2008 at 4:34 PM

Reagan was the first president I was old enough to vote for in 1980, even though my mom said he was a warmonger, would get us into nuclear war, etc. etc etc. She came around, though, after just 4 years of leadership from this remarkable, God-sent, optimistic leader who had the courage of his convictions. I love him, and actually teared up when I heard he had passed away. Don’t you love that last phrase in his speech– his first inaugural? Why shouldn’t we be optimistic about the future….We….are Americans. Where is the rhetoric like that today when we need it?

My favorite Reagan story is when he was running in 1980.
A reporter reminded him that many people thought of him as a war monger, and then asked him if he could promise that he would not invade Cuba. Now, in light of the accusations that he would be trigger happy, he could have answered the question in moderate tones, soothing tones. But no, Reagan got a twinkle in his eye, and he said, “Well, you know Sam, I don’t think Mr. Castro should ever go to sleep at night but that he doesn’t think we might be coming in.” That is classic Reagan! Funny and full of insight at the same time. Man, I miss him!

gajaw999 on February 13, 2008 at 4:38 PM

Ditto!!!

Rest In Peace, Mr. President!

FloridaBill on February 13, 2008 at 4:57 PM

Bad Penny on February 13, 2008 at 1:06 PM
I think it is the first inaugural. Anyone else know for sure?

TX Mom on February 13, 2008 at 2:14 PM

Yes, the first inaugural. I played hookey from school that day to watch it and I remember specifically the last line, “And why shouldn’t we believe that? We are Americans”, and Jimmy Carter standing and giving the Gipper enthusiastic applause.

Tuning Spork on February 13, 2008 at 6:36 PM

Don’t you love that last phrase in [Reagan’s] speech– his first inaugural? Why shouldn’t we be optimistic about the future….We….are Americans. Where is the rhetoric like that today when we need it?
gajaw999 on February 13, 2008 at 4:38 PM

Just yesterday I happened to see a random clip from an old Jimmy Carter speech – I guess from his “malaise” diatribe – where he was talking about how pessimistic and negative the mood in America was. And the dork seemed to be badgering us about it. Yeah, that’s a hell of a solution there, Jimmy.

This shouldn’t be something only the “great communicator” could understand. It’s the commonest of common sense: If you want people to be positive there’s only one way to do it – be positive yourself!

Right now, Barack Obama’s the only candidate giving out that vibe. But there’s a huge difference: Obama keeps promising America a bright future – but only if we change absolutely everything this country stands for….

Of course, what Obama’s saying would be horrifically depressing to anyone who stopped for a second and thought it through. Unfortunately, there’s an awful lot of people out there for whom that will never be a problem.

logis on February 13, 2008 at 6:44 PM

It is kind of funny seeing the under 40 crowd waxing so sentimental about Reagan. Most don’t remember him except through the eyes of a kid. None ever voted for him. I guess the parental influence has a little to do with it.

Bradky on February 13, 2008 at 6:48 PM

God! I needed that! Thanks, Bryan.

rmgraha on February 13, 2008 at 7:14 PM

Ronald Reagan, American.

We miss you Mr. President.

Zorro on February 13, 2008 at 7:29 PM

This puts me in mind of a cab driver I had in Korea. He picked me up outside the Osan gate. I used my rudimentary Korean to direct him to the bus station, then set about having a basic conversation. Midway through, he reached down, picked up the book in his center console, and held it up proudly. It was a bio of Reagan written in Korean.
He said solemnly, in English: “You know Ronald Reagan? Great, great man.”
I was smiling for the rest of the day.
Great video. Thanks, Bryan.

joewm315 on February 13, 2008 at 7:36 PM

Not bad.

Big S on February 13, 2008 at 12:54 PM

Not bad at all. Too bad McCain delivered it very stiffly and dryly. There was NO conviction in his voice. I could speculate as to why, but I won’t.

SouthernGent on February 13, 2008 at 7:42 PM

I honestly teared up. President Reagan was no politician. He was a man. True beliefs, true vision, iron spine.

This generation needs a Reagan. Badly.

Skidd on February 13, 2008 at 8:03 PM

A great man. A great president.

p40tiger on February 13, 2008 at 8:31 PM

This puts me in mind of a cab driver I had in Korea… He said solemnly, in English: “You know Ronald Reagan? Great, great man.”
joewm315 on February 13, 2008 at 7:36 PM

Ronald Reagan is practically considered a god in Japan. He represents more than just America; he represents what America should be.

logis on February 13, 2008 at 8:39 PM

It is kind of funny seeing the under 40 crowd waxing so sentimental about Reagan. Most don’t remember him except through the eyes of a kid. None ever voted for him. I guess the parental influence has a little to do with it.

Bradky on February 13, 2008 at 6:48 PM

I was 18 when RWR left office, I never had the pleasure of voting for President Reagan. He was the first President I have clear memory of. The Peanut Farmer I barely remember, and I’m glad I wasn’t old enough to understand how bad everything was.

Bryan, thank you for posting this inspirational Reagan speech. I needed to hear the words of my favorite President after shoveling several inches of freezing slush.

I truly miss and love this great man. I had to wipe away a few tears after watching this.

Mooseman on February 13, 2008 at 9:03 PM

He represents more than just America; he represents what America should be.

logis on February 13, 2008 at 8:39 PM

Yes. Amen, logis. He represents what we should be.

Skidd on February 13, 2008 at 9:08 PM

Gipper, yes we can beat the Commies, and we did!

Obama, yes we can turn a sure Victory into a pitiful Defeat! YES WE CAN!

Chakra Hammer on February 13, 2008 at 9:24 PM

“Those who say that we’re in a time when there are no heroes… they just don’t know where to look.”

Sadly, right now, I just don’t know where to look :(

I really miss that great visionary man. I wish we had him now more than ever. God rest his soul.

SilverStar830 on February 13, 2008 at 9:24 PM

Bryan,

When you say this is muuuch better than the black-eyed-please-use-your-brain-and-realize-there-is-no-substance guy’s version, I fear you do not see that it is all about style and presentation with the Obamatitus plague; content means nothing.

As a conservative counter to that vid, this Reagan thing is an unimaginative joke. I mean, c’mon… what Obamatoid is going to see this and go, “Wow man, I was missing it…now HE’S cool…” None.

It’s about the FEELING bro, and “Yes I Can (support crazy leftist ideas without even knowing it)” just gives me that feeling. Once we conservatives get that, I think we might stay in the game.

Keith

kickstar1 on February 13, 2008 at 9:49 PM

My teenage years in the 60’s were marked by assassinations (JFK, MLK, RFK) and riots (Watts, civil rights, Viet Nam) and wars (VN, Israel’s Six Day War). I mean there was real violence in the streets and on the news every day. All this came after being kids in the 50’s hearing that Khrushchev wanted to bury us and listening our parents talk about what they would do if there was a nuclear attack. We had to live through LBJ’s “Great Society” and Carter malaise.

Then came Mr. Reagan.

They say that the United States has had its day in the sun; that our nation has passed its zenith. They expect you to tell your children that the American people no longer have the will to cope with their problems; that the future will be one of sacrifice and few opportunities.

My fellow citizens, I utterly reject that view. The American people, the most generous on earth, who created the highest standard of living, are not going to accept the notion that we can only make a better world for others by moving backwards ourselves. Those who believe we can have no business leading the nation.

I will not stand by and watch this great country destroy itself under mediocre leadership that drifts from one crisis to the next, eroding our national will and purpose. We have come together here because the American people deserve better from those to whom they entrust our nation’s highest offices, and we stand united in our resolve to do something about it.

For those of us who became conservatives, there are a multitude of reasons why we have been and always will be grateful for and to Ronald Reagan.

INC on February 13, 2008 at 10:43 PM

And for those of you who’d like to read more Reagan:

Reagan 2020: Clear Vision for the 21st Century

INC on February 13, 2008 at 10:47 PM

God Bless that man. His deep heartfelt love of America shown out of every word he spoke. I don’t hear that any more, but for a very few. Let’s win this one for the Gipper.

HotAirExpert on February 13, 2008 at 11:58 PM

For those of us who became conservatives, there are a multitude of reasons why we have been and always will be grateful for and to Ronald Reagan.

INC on February 13, 2008 at 10:43 PM

President Reagan had a multitude of beautiful speeches like the partial one you posted. I’ve got to tell you, when I first heard him speak like that, I thought of it as hooey. I thought of him as an old man living in the past.

Over time, he showed me I was a young punk who had no hope, no faith, no vision, no energy, no willingness to do the hard work to maintain the freedoms we were all pissing away in a culture of drugs, sex, and ignorance.

I wasn’t the only one who realized I was the problem and not him.

A great man.

Skidd on February 14, 2008 at 12:03 AM

The Great Communicator.

Thanks Bryan. I needed that.

labrat on February 14, 2008 at 4:25 AM

That was awesome! This speech illustrates why so many candidates claim to be like him, but no one can.

threeCents on February 14, 2008 at 8:36 AM

Soon I started weeping.

Reagan is THE reason many of our generation became conservatives.

The man had a genuine Love for our country and saw NOTHING but the greatness in it and of our people.

Would Reagan believe what is going on right now?
What would he say?

Conservaboomer on February 14, 2008 at 9:40 AM