France’s “quiet” New Year’s night

posted at 12:27 pm on January 3, 2008 by Bryan

Sure, the number of automotive flambees went down a notch compared to last year. But the fact that there is such a stat and its decline is touted says…something.

Vandals torched 372 cars as France celebrated the New Year, down on the figure last year after a night the police described as “relatively calm.”

Cars are burned fairly regularly in France and the image of vehicles in flames in poor suburbs became symbolic of riots in 2005 when angry youths set fire to thousands of cars.

There is usually an increase in the number of cars torched on New Year’s Eve compared to other days of the year.

“The night was relatively calm, without notable incident, there were very few direct clashes with the security forces,” said a spokesman for the national police.

Without notable incident…if you don’t count the nearly 400 cars that were burned all over the country.

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

De Nile. Pardon my French.

infidel on January 3, 2008 at 12:33 PM

I think fewer cars were torched in Baghdad.

amerpundit on January 3, 2008 at 12:33 PM

Wouldn’t BURNING cars increase global warming? C’est bizarre!

SouthernGent on January 3, 2008 at 12:35 PM

when angry youths Muslims

2Brave2Bscared on January 3, 2008 at 12:37 PM

There is usually an increase in the number of cars torched on New Year’s Eve compared to other days of the year.

I wonder exactly how many cars, on the average day, are torched there? I mean, is that comforting to know?

JetBoy on January 3, 2008 at 12:39 PM

I attribute the decline to the cold weather which made the “youths” stay home.

AlexB on January 3, 2008 at 12:40 PM

Hey, at least we waited until 3:30 AM for the first murder in Indy!

Dr.Cwac.Cwac on January 3, 2008 at 12:40 PM

They average about 100 cars torched a night these days. Before the 2006 riots, the number was about 40 a night.

French authorities also prohibited sales of gas in cans prior to New Years to discourage vandals from torching cars.

lawhawk on January 3, 2008 at 12:45 PM

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!

Stupid Euroes. Keep appeasing retards.

thareb on January 3, 2008 at 12:47 PM

They average about 100 cars torched a night these days.

Unreal…Dear gawd, what are the insurance rates like? Well, if it’s France, it’s probably subsidized…

JetBoy on January 3, 2008 at 12:49 PM

Can a previously-torched car get re-torched and still count as a car torching?

James on January 3, 2008 at 1:00 PM

Fear of deportation?

Kini on January 3, 2008 at 1:01 PM

SouthernGent on January 3, 2008 at 12:35 PM

I was thinking the exact same thing , perhaps the car-b-q’ers have bought some carbon credit offsets .

Mojack420 on January 3, 2008 at 1:02 PM

I once spent one of the worst New Years Eves in Paris visiting a cousin who lived there. We went to a party to which I brought some champaign and a bottle of wine. I put them down on the kitchen table and walked into the bedroom to leave my coat and not two minutes later I returned to find the bottles missing. I looked around everywhere. In the Fridge, throughout the party I found nothing. I told my cousin and she said just find something to drink in the kitchen but there was nothing lying around. Everyone was hoarding their own alcohol. I ended up sitting in the bedroom watching the movie Supergirl in French. That was only the beginning of the evening that ended up with us at a gay rave in some warehouse again with no alcohol. Sober and grossed out is no fun on NYE.

Bill C on January 3, 2008 at 1:16 PM

If a car is torched in the night, but the dhimmedia doesn’t report it, did it really burn?

thebaldchick on January 3, 2008 at 1:23 PM

Vandals torched 372 cars as France celebrated the New Year, down on the figure last year after a night the police described as “relatively calm.”

Cars are burned fairly regularly in France and the image of vehicles in flames in poor suburbs became symbolic of riots in 2005 when angry youths set fire to thousands of cars.

There is usually an increase in the number of cars torched on New Year’s Eve compared to other days of the year.

“The night was relatively calm, without notable incident, there were very few direct clashes with the security forces,” said a spokesman for the national police.

You would think, that even in France, Muslims asserting their dominance by costing many millions by burning cars and rioting and raping with impunity on a nightly basis for two years (that we know of) would by now have become the sex with a skunk scenario, you just get tired of that old stink’n s..t.

Speakup on January 3, 2008 at 1:29 PM

I wonder what part of the Koran demands car burning? Probably the same part that demands strangling your daughter.

I dunno.

OhEssYouCowboys on January 3, 2008 at 1:38 PM

Is burning cars France’s version of our graffiti artists?

Tim Burton on January 3, 2008 at 2:00 PM

burn baby burn

dingbat on January 3, 2008 at 2:19 PM

Wouldn’t BURNING cars increase global warming? C’est bizarre!

SouthernGent on January 3, 2008 at 12:35 PM

Well, no. The gases given off by burning cars are considerably less than those of driving the car over a period of time.

Is burning cars France’s version of our graffiti artists?

Tim Burton on January 3, 2008 at 2:00 PM

The graffiti blight is all over Europe as here. Unlike most people, I’ve actually talked to the “graffiti artists”, and graffiti is as lunatic a religious activity as jihad. We need to make an example of some “graffiti artists” by castrating them while anesthetized. (I strongly oppose torture.) Castration would be make them objects of mockery and would stop the attractions of the graffiti cult.

thuja on January 3, 2008 at 2:20 PM

Where’s the Goreguin? Thousands of burning cars has to create nearly as much carbon footprint as the jet he flies around the world.

Speakup on January 3, 2008 at 2:53 PM

If you click on the link you’ll see this as the last paragraph. I wonder what ‘some places’ they are talking about?

Police had stepped up their presence on French streets in anticipation of the year-end celebrations and the sale of petrol in cans was banned in some places.

bcre8v on January 3, 2008 at 3:07 PM

Seulement 372 voitures flambées en France pour le nouvel an . . . et c’est progress? Zut alors! Je pense qu’il y avait moins des voitures flambées en Iraq en 2007!

Les Parisiens adorent bien à flamber leurs voitures, non? Peut-être ils préféreraient à marcher partout? :)

Tiens, peut-être c’est pourquoi les voitures en France sont tellement petite . . . ils sont plus économique à remplacer quand “les jeunes” les flambent.

372 burning cars on New Year’s Eve is progress? I think there were less cars burned in Iraq last year.

Parisians sure love to burn cars, huh? Maybe they’d prefer to walk everywhere?

Maybe that’s why the cars are so small; they’re cheaper to replace when “the youths” burn them.

fourstringfuror on January 3, 2008 at 4:21 PM

Nearly 400 cars burned at New Years and that’s considered GOOD? Imagine that happening in the state of Texas (France can fit inside Texas) This couldn’t be caused by the Muslim population could it? Sounds like a great place to raise a family.

I sure hope America is paying attention to where liberal immigration laws lead. I don’t remember reading about this kind of lawlessness in France 20 years ago. But maybe in a few years we’ll be reading about it happening right here.

Ernest on January 4, 2008 at 11:46 AM