Video: The case for Fred

posted at 10:28 am on December 28, 2007 by Allahpundit

Process of elimination via Right Wing News. Fredheads may be interested to know that their guy, in his hour of need, with a fundraising deadline less than eight hours away, is still almost $100,000 from his goal. For all my jokey comparisons between the ‘Heads and the Paulnuts, this much is clear: Either the ‘Nuts have a lot more disposable income or the ‘Heads aren’t nearly as enamored of their candidate as they claim. Chop chop.

As the rest of the field works hard to lower expectations in Iowa, Fred’s actually raising his. Last month it was fourth place that was unacceptable. Today the goalposts have moved. Does he know something we don’t or is it a simple case of not wanting to admit on television that he’ll be happy, and lucky, just to take the bronze?


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What we don’t like about Romney is how he has no center, he’s just a salesman. To the pro-abortionists he was one of them. Now he wants to become president so he’s a born-again, if you will, pro-lifer. He’s for gun control until he runs for president then he’s anti gun control. He’s for amnesty as governor but then he’s anti amnesty running for president. This puts a sour taste in conservatives mouths. Add to that the Mormon cult thing and the evangelicals have no enthusiasm for the guy. When the founder of your church calls Christianity an abomination to God, it’s not going to be a plus for your campaign.

Fred can put Mitt in charge of the U.S. department of genealogical research.

Mojave Mark on December 28, 2007 at 9:47 PM

You hate children or something?

MadisonConservative on December 28, 2007 at 10:23 PM

I do like his immigration plan!

He spells out his positions loud and clear. We need these conservative values. We need Fred.

eucher on December 29, 2007 at 9:15 AM

The man shut down his company to search for the daughter of one employee. The man does charity work when no one is looking, just like GWB (one of his finer qualities). His company Bain Capital helped start up juggernauts like Staples.

Seriously dude, you don’t become a CEO, at least not a successful one, because your dad is loaded and you look good in a suit. The RDS is strong in this one.

BKennedy on December 28, 2007 at 8:42 PM

This is a good example of the differences between the candidates. I like what Mitt does in his personal life. He appears to be very selfless and sacrifices for others. That may affect me directly when he is president and it certainly will be a plus when dealing with his rivals. In order for any candidate to break the gridlock, our side is going to have to give up something. The presidents job is to convince us that those sacrifices are worth the gains. Mitt’s employees would rather make money than not, but he convinced them that the greater good was served by searching for the family member of a fellow employee. I believe this was one of Reagan’s great strengths.

csdeven on December 29, 2007 at 9:24 AM

To csdeven:
csdeven- we both know what you do and why. YOU are a master at the art of changing the topic from FDT to CSDEVEN. It is remarkable how you can hijack EVERY Fred thread. I am really in awe. Although most of the grownups have recognized that to accomplish your goal you must get ever more outrageous in order to get somone to fall for it and respond to you.

Your track record is astounding. I bet 85% minimum of the serious Fred threads are destroyed by you! Single-handedly!
Whatever the Mitt-en pay you- IT IS NOT ENOUGH! Dude- you manage to stop any serious discussion of FDT cold.
Amazing!

I usually only stick in the threads until you show up- but I do check back when they’ve gone cold. YOU ARE THE MASTER at destroying a thread. HotAir is young- they’ll wise up eventually- but until then- you are gettin’ your job done. And my hat’s off to ya.

*I still don’t think yer guy’s gonna get the nod. But dang, ya’ll are GREAT at shuttin’ down Fred.

Ex-tex on December 29, 2007 at 9:48 AM

Fred can put Mitt in charge of the U.S. department of genealogical research.

Mojave Mark on December 28, 2007 at 9:47 PM

I thought Fred was all about shrinking the size of government? :-)

Besides, the LDS genealogical work is the gold standard of genealogical research. Having the government do it would muck it up.

csdeven on December 29, 2007 at 10:42 AM

Besides, the LDS genealogical work is the gold standard of genealogical research

:-)

Experienced genealogists are ROFLTAO at that statement!

Texas Gal on December 29, 2007 at 11:48 AM

Experienced genealogists are ROFLTAO at that statement!

Texas Gal on December 29, 2007 at 11:48 AM

They shouldn’t be, because many experienced genealogists use the LDS church’s records whenever they get stuck.

csdeven on December 29, 2007 at 2:38 PM

They shouldn’t be, because many experienced genealogists use the LDS church’s records whenever they get stuck.

This is obviously an area that you have no experience in and evidently don’t understand the purpose behind the LDS family records.

The LDS records are a good place for a novice to begin but no experienced genealogist, such as myself, would rely on those records as being accurate much less use them “whenever they get stuck”.

They are by NO MEANS a “gold standard” as you describe them.

Texas Gal on December 29, 2007 at 3:55 PM

I am amazed that this thread is still going. I don’t live on these things and I thought this was yesterday. Since it is still here
1)Fred is still the best qualified candidate
2)cs doesn’t make any sense at all
3)Why does Allah dislike Fred so much? Maybe Michelle
should replace him with someone with more sense
4)When are we going to replace this insane nominating
process with something sensible?
5)What does going through this process have to do with
ability to be a qualified president?

duff65 on December 29, 2007 at 4:32 PM

experienced genealogist, such as myself

Care to enlighten this genealogical novice with your wisdom?I would like some more about your research methods.

fourstringfuror on December 29, 2007 at 8:02 PM

Care to enlighten this genealogical novice with your wisdom? I would like some more about your research methods.
fourstringfuror on December 29, 2007 at 8:02 PM

I was only making the point that the LDS church records are a good place to start. The family tree info that has been submitted to the LSD is online HERE

Some State vital records that have been transcribed for the LSD Library in Salt Lake City are there also. There are some good resources at the LDS site. However, the family trees that have been submitted are not error free and most often you will find conflicting information submitted by several different family members for the same person being researched. So, if you are serious about genealogy research of your family you should use those family records as a place to begin but don’t take them as accurate without doing your own documentation. The family tree records at the LSD site do not come with documentation.

Personally, I’ve been involved in family research for 20+ years and have been focused on my paternal (father’s) line for about the last 15 years. This line has been passed down by males to my father since the 1st emigrant who came to American in 1727 as an indentured convict after being convicted as a horse thief and sentenced to transportation to the Royal Colony of Carolina by the British court.

I’ve found that people become involved in genealogy for different reason. For me it’s about building a family history that goes beyond the collecting of data. I like to be able to place my ancestors in historical times so I get a better sense of who they were, how they lived, what they probably did for a living, what the social norms were, etc. Basically, I strive to bring them to “life”. Last year I started a blog that tells the story of my paternal family in a narrative format and incorporates the records I’ve found to document the narratives.

Research methods vary depending on your time frame and circumstances. For example, federal census records are a primary source and very useful back to 1850 because the records include the names of the household. Before 1850 the records only include the name of the head of the household. The first census was in 1790 and are only available to 1930. Vital records are a primary source also but most of the early States did not begin keeping birth and death records until about 1900-10. Some States do have marriage records that date back to the mid-1700’s if they were kept by their church, but they are rare. Civil marriage records are usually kept by the county courthouses. But many of them have been lost due to fire and water damage, not to mention the burning of courthouses in the South during the Civil War. Land records, Deeds of Gift and Last Wills are also primary source and often include family name and relationship, those that survived can usually be found in the county courthouse or the State’s Archives. Many cities now have genealogy societies who have preserved their courthouse records and in a lot of cases have conducted inventories of the cemeteries in their area where they have plotted the graveyard and recorded the information on the headstones.

Short of having a clear document, my general methodology is to develop the best theory and work from there, prove or disprove it. When you get back so far that documents are rare, I mostly use the process of elimination to develop a case of circumstantial evidence.

Now there are a lot of online sites available to help with research but once you get beyond census and some of the transcribed vital records, you’ll probably find you’ll have to go to the county courthouse of where your ancestor lived. Sometimes, the State’s Archives will have gathered the information from their county courthouses and have it available on microfilm.

But remember that when you read an index to a record it was probably created by someone employed under the WPA Program and accuracy wasn’t always a priority. You should always try to get a look at the original record yourself.

RootsWeb is a very informative site and has a large database search engine here:
Rootsweb (dot) com
Look under the heading Mailing List you can find an email list to the message board of those also researching your surname and might find others related to your line. It helps to have someone to research with.

There is a very good page on how to get started here:
rwguide (dot) rootsweb (dot) com

And USGenWeb is a volunteer driven site that coordinates various free sources and connects to websites run by volunteers in individual States, broken down by counties here:
usgenweb (dot) com

Cyndi’s List is another good free resource here:
Cyndislist (dot) com

If you’re not familiar with these sites, I’d recommend spending some time exploring them. Also, it’s recommended that you begin by filling out a 5-generation chart with as much information as you can gather including from other family members. At the RootsWeb site look under the heading Charts and Forms and then look for Ancestral Chart and you can download the form.

My primary resource now is ancestry (dot) com It is a paid subscription site and is pretty reliable. But you have to remember their census records are transcribed by staff members, some of whom aren’t really good at reading old handwriting.

As someone who is beginning in this endeavor let me say to you that you are undoubtedly going to encounter others who will not be willing to share with you because they seem to feel that they put in the time, money and effort and therefore they “own” the information. But don’t get discouraged, because you will also find those like me that believe the more family members, regardless of how distant “cousins” we are, that I share my research with, the more our common ancestors will be remembered. That’s the reason I do it. So they are not forgotten.

Texas Gal on December 29, 2007 at 10:24 PM

Texas Gal on December 29, 2007 at 3:55 PM

Your experience may be in that vein, but I know folks who have been doing genealogy for 50+ years that would laugh in your face. LDS records are gathered from the same places you just mentioned, but they don’t limit the scope. One resource the LDS have that is widely used are historical journals written by family members. There are wealths of information there that is not found anywhere else. Thus, people approach the LDS database for issues when they are stuck.

I caution you on this because you present their records as a place for novices to start, suggesting that after that, there is nothing left to find. This is a gross mis-characterization. I know of no resource that shouldn’t be checked and rechecked often.

csdeven on December 30, 2007 at 12:52 AM

I caution you on this because you present their records as a place for novices to start, suggesting that after that, there is nothing left to find. This is a gross mis-characterization. I know of no resource that shouldn’t be checked and rechecked often.

csdeven on December 30, 2007 at 12:52 AM

csdeven,

LOL.. you caution me?

I clearly stated:
There are some good resources at the LDS site. However, the family trees that have been submitted are not error free Their records are a good place for a novice to begin their research. It provides a platform to work from, but the family trees found there should not be taken as accurate without doing your own documentation. No where in my statement did I say there was nothing left to find. Most of the public records found at the LDS Library can also be found at National Archives and State Archives. Of course, LDS members may find the resources at the LDS Library more useful than non-LSD members just as I’ve found the SC Archives more useful for records of my paternal line since they lived in SC for almost 100 years.

You may know people who have been doing genealogy research for 50+ years. I know some people doing it that long too. In this case, I have Mormons in my extended family that are involved in LDS research so I do know what I’m speaking about.

Once again your response clearly indicates to me that you are not experienced in genealogy research since you don’t seem to be able to comprehend what I’ve said.

Your previous statement was that the LDS church records were the “gold standard” for genealogy. They are not. They are one resource.

Texas Gal on December 30, 2007 at 1:27 AM

Texas Gal on December 30, 2007 at 1:27 AM

Your rhetoric sounded like you were dismissing it as a less than reliable source beyond simple research. But I’m glad to see you admit that your situation is different and it doesn’t apply to all. And ALL genealogical stats should be verified. Personal journals are a huge resource for that and to not mention that in your comments seemed careless. Ergo my suggestion that you be careful.

And no, I am not an expert, but I know enough of them to know that your comment was a very narrow view that apparently pertains to your specific situation.

csdeven on December 30, 2007 at 2:02 AM

Texas Gal on December 29, 2007 at 10:24 PM

“don’t get discouraged, because you will also find those like me that believe the more family members, regardless of how distant “cousins” we are, that I share my research with, the more our common ancestors will be remembered. That’s the reason I do it. So they are not forgotten.”

BRAVA!
Your genealogical achievements are great, and your motivation is a wonderful inspiration for others, as well.

My father has devoted the past 60 years to his family’s genealogical work, and being his devoted child, I enjoyed the fruits of his labors. With all of his research, he emphasized the relations/progeny as the “now” relevance, stroking the living whose minds revolve around revisionism for self preservation. For myself, since the living still have their say, my fascination was to know family lives in history, to appreciate who they were and what their lives meant to them. Over the years, having matured beyond the bragging rights stage, I have found that honoring their memory does not require what they would have demanded. Because of my father’s dedicated work, I am intimately aware of my progenitors’ personal lives (past 6 generations journals/correspondences) and know the names/dates/places of my father’s lines through our Colonial era and immigration from Europe. Reading my father’s own life story, I also know better than to believe everything written in a journal meant to qualify the author for sainthood. Rationalization promoting fabrication creates a stench that dishonors all value and integrity. There’s always a grain of salt required to savor the story-teller’s slant with objectivity. Accuracy matters on the record. Any single social event is infinitely more complex than one opinion, no matter its popular status as legend.

I honor my family and ancestors by knowing who they were, loving them for their virtues, not drowning their memory with expectations of perfection doomed to disillusionment upon further study, and praying for their peace in Christ as the mutual bond we share in common beyond the grave and genes. That they were kind enough to compose personal journals is their blessing for me, a lover of history and fair play.

maverick muse on December 30, 2007 at 10:08 AM

maverick muse on December 30, 2007 at 10:08 AM

Same here. I’ve got lots of relatives with “colorful” pasts as well as a Continental Army general from the Revolutionary War. I am as excited about them all equally. Heck, even the stories that are “embellished” are fun to tell.

csdeven on December 30, 2007 at 11:32 AM

Texas Gal on December 29, 2007 at 10:24 PM

Thanks, Texas Gal. I have done some preliminary work on my family (through six generations), but I want to go much, much further.

Where can I find your blog?

fourstringfuror on December 30, 2007 at 2:25 PM

maverick muse,

Thanks for your kind words. I’m glad to hear you father has preserved your family history. It’s a wonderful gift that’s value becomes more apparent as the young grow older.

I think your father and I have the same philosophy about our endeavors, unlike a few others I know regardless of how long they have been pursuing the adventure of genealogy. I too enjoy history and for me it goes hand-in-glove with genealogy.

Your father did most of his the old fashion way, that’s how I got started and still spend quite a few days and weeks digging through courthouse records and visiting old graveyards. Now with the internet it’s possible to connect with others who share your “DNA” from many generations back. It increases the discoveries that you make, like old letters, bibles, pictures, oral histories, etc. that were passed down many generations ago that otherwise might have been lost forever.

csdeven,

Your rhetoric sounded like you were dismissing it as a less than reliable source beyond simple research.

It was your listening that missed my intent not my “rhetoric”. Seems to me that your ego was engaged and you wrongly assumed my ego was also engaged when it’s wasn’t. And that’s why you still don’t hear me clearly.

My use of the term novice was not demeaning. It was used to describe someone who is new to this endeavor. But you interpreted it as me using a derogatory term in order to make myself superior when I wasn’t.
Fourstringfuror,

Where can I find your blog?

You’re welcome. Here’s the link to my genealogy blog. I’ve not had the time to do much this year for a multitude of reason. I realize that someone else’s family history holds little interest for someone who is not related. But I think you might find the format useful. I have found that using the blog format is so much more entertaining than what most printed family genealogy publications provide. Those mostly consist of charts and graphs and maybe a few pictures. I’m more focused on analysis of the documentation by putting it in a narrative format and using the link features to provide the documents on the back pages. When possible I try to incorporate historical aspects of the times.

If I can provide you with any assistance in your endeavor, you’ll find a link to my email addy on the website.

Texas Gal on December 30, 2007 at 5:32 PM

In fact, other people’s family history hold a lot of interest for me. Not only do I enjoy uncovering the past of my relatives, I like to know others share the same excitement as I do when I find soemthing. Using a blog format is certainly intriguing. When I get my stuff together, as it were, I’ll have to consider that.

Speaking of stuff, I opened an email from a distant cousing today to find a PDF of one branch of the tree going back to 1550!

fourstringfuror on December 30, 2007 at 5:58 PM

I like to know others share the same excitement as I do when I find something.

I opened an email from a distant cousin today to find a PDF of one branch of the tree going back to 1550!

fourstringfuror on December 30, 2007 at 5:58 PM

:-)

I know the feeling of excitement! I get the same feeling. Those who aren’t into genealogy … just don’t understand us! ;-)

That’s fantastic! Getting back to 1550 is quite an achievement!

I’ve not been able to get any of my ancestors back to their old county, they came here to early! But I did get an opportunity to make a trip to Norfolk County, England in 2005 and visit the village that my old paternal ancestor once lived in before he was convicted and sentenced to the American colonies. That was quite a thrill.

Since this thread appears to be basically dead except for us, I’ll share this poem with you. I think you’ll enjoy it.

THE CENSUS TAKER

It was the first day of census, and all through the land;
The pollster was ready … a black book in hand.
He mounted his horse for a long dusty ride;
His book and some quills were tucked close by his side.

A long winding ride down a road barely there;
Toward the smell of fresh bread wafting, up through the air.
The woman was tired, with lines on her face;
And wisps of brown hair she tucked back into place.

She gave him some water … as they sat at the table;
And she answered his questions … the best she was able.
He asked of her children… Yes, she had quite a few;
The oldest was twenty, the youngest not two.

She held up a toddler with cheeks round and red;
His sister, she whispered, was napping in bed.
She noted each person who lived there with pride;
And she felt the faint stirrings of the wee one inside.

He noted the sex, the color, the age…
The marks from the quill soon filled up the page.
At the number of children, she nodded her head;
And saw her lips quiver for the three that were dead.

The places of birth she “never forgot”;
Was it Kansas? or Utah? or Oregon … or not?
They came from Scotland, of that she was clear;
But she wasn’t quite sure just how long they’d been here.

They spoke of employment, of schooling and such;
They could read some, and write some .. though really not much.
When the questions were answered, his job there was done;
So he mounted his horse and he rode toward the sun.

We can almost imagine his voice loud and clear;
“May God bless you all for another ten years.”
Now picture a time warp … its’ now you and me;
As we search for the people on our family tree.

We squint at the census and scroll down so slow;
As we search for that entry from long, long ago.
Could they only imagine on that long ago day;
That the entries they made would effect us this way?

If they knew, would they wonder at the yearning we feel;
And the searching that makes them so increasingly real.
We can hear if we listen, the words they impart;
Through their blood in our veins and their voice in our heart.

Author Unknown

Texas Gal on December 30, 2007 at 7:11 PM

I spent some time reading your blog, and was wondering if you did any research in Mr. Rudd and his family when you were in England.

That’s a great poem. “If the knew . . . ” perhaps they would have left a few more details, and maybe written more carefully!

fourstringfuror on December 31, 2007 at 11:26 AM

did any research in Mr. Rudd and his family when you were in England.

The only information we have about his location in England is the entry in “The Complete Book of Emigrants in Bondage ~ 1614-1775” by Peter Wilson Coldham that says: Rudd, Burlingham of Poringland, S s horse Summer 1728 *Nf

That translates into Burlingham Rudd of Poringland Parish was sentenced to transportation for stealing a horse. He was sentenced in the summer of 1728 by the circuit court of the County of Norfolk, England. But this record does tell me where to look for the record, so I had to educate myself on the old English court system.

I did go to Norwich (county seat) in Norfolk on my trip to England and the library there does have a small genealogy collection with the microfilm of the original parish records, but it was very difficult to read and I had only one day since I was actually in England to see a friend off before deployment to Iraq. I did find one entry pre-1727 for a Thomas Rudd baptism so there was a Rudd family there. They did have some of the County court records for sentenced to transportation but his name was not listed. That probably means that he was taken to London for trial at the Old Bailey. The record does exists somewhere or it could not appear in this book.

I spent the rest of that day locating the village of Poringland and visiting the old church that has a Saxon-era foundation! I talked to the post-mistress to see if there were any old Rudd families there. She said there were 2 families but they were new to the area. Poringland is now a bedroom commuter community about 5 kilometers out of Norwich.

But it was such a thrill to be standing on the same land where my ancestor had lived 278 years ago!

What I did determine is that on my next visit I will go to London and search the Old Bailey records to see if there is any record of who testified for or against him and that might hold a clue to his parentage. We don’t really know any more about him except that his given name of Burlingham might have been based on one of the three Burlingham Parishes in that area around Poringland. So it’s possible that he got his name because he was referred to as the Rudd from Burlingham and that became Burlingham Rudd.

If I can swing it, I’m thinking of going back this summer.

perhaps they would have left a few more details, and maybe written more carefully!

Ain’t that the truth! I was really disappointed with the 2000 census in that it did not collect all the specifics on every person in the US. Seems nothing has changed since 1790!

Texas Gal on December 31, 2007 at 2:34 PM

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