New Vent: The Death of the Grown-Up, Part 2

posted at 9:16 am on September 28, 2007 by Bryan

In her first book, The Death of the Grown-up: How America’s Arrested Development Is Bringing Down Western Civilization, Washington Times columnist Diana West explores the implications of a society full of people who have internalized multi-culturalism and the youth movement of decades past. In the conclusion of Michelle’s interview with Diana, West explains how the death of grown-up thinking and attitudes affects our ability to defend ourselves and our culture from the global jihad.

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I think you put part I up again…I swear I heard this already.

Bad Candy on September 28, 2007 at 9:25 AM

Actually…yeah, part I the intro says it, hadn’t bothered to read it.

Bad Candy on September 28, 2007 at 9:26 AM

Bad code. Sorry about that. It’s fixed now.

Bryan on September 28, 2007 at 9:30 AM

Im hear to Halp!

Bad Candy on September 28, 2007 at 9:32 AM

PC run amuck has killed OUR American culture.

abinitioadinfinitum on September 28, 2007 at 1:16 PM

She makes so much sense. This is what our kids should be taught.

darwin on September 28, 2007 at 1:17 PM

‘Multiculturalism’ is really just a regurgitation of Rousseau’s ‘Noble Savage,’ but has morphed into ‘newspeak’ for anything anti-ethnically European.

Diana West’s book is important, as are Buchanan’s “Death of the West” and Steyn’s “America Alone” (which is increasingly looking less likely). But I still think Schaeffer got to the heart of the matter half a century ago.

PRCalDude on September 28, 2007 at 1:55 PM

She’s so right about multiculturalism. There’s no right or wrong with these people, there’s just different. After all, who are we to tell others that female circumcision is morally wrong?

2Brave2Bscared on September 28, 2007 at 1:57 PM

Napier time!

see-dubya on September 28, 2007 at 2:14 PM

“After all, who are we to tell others that female circumcision is morally wrong?”

We can tell them whatever we want. But they’re there, and we’re here. And as much as some countries hate us, it’s funny how their people are falling over each other to get here. I doubt it’s so they can continue such “noble” practices as genital mutilation. So we have an “American culture.” It has historically taken what is good and noble — not to mention compatible — about other cultures and added to our own. But such assimilation honors that which is already here.

I think this is especially important to impress upon school children from other lands. You don’t have to rap them on the knuckles every time they use their first language, but you do have to insist that they use their new one — that would be English, by the way — OR face being misunderstood.

It really is their choice. Their consequences. Don’t y’all come cryin’ to me ‘cuz you’re misunderstood, comprendez?

manwithblackhat on September 28, 2007 at 2:14 PM

This lady is on to something. Its time to grow up and cease the worship of the shallowness/immaturity cult. I’m reminded of the moment in history when a 17 year old girl in front of an audience asked President Clinton whether he wore boxers or briefs. Ole’ morally compass-less one missed a wonderful opportunity to make a statement about preoccupation with such adolescent nonsense. He actually dignified the question with a response. Don’t get me started…

leavenedbread on September 28, 2007 at 2:15 PM

Excellent Vents. Diana West made many insightful and thought provoking observations.

It’s fascinating how so many facets can be tied together and seen as manifested from the loss and disrespect of maturity and how that may to be central to a peculiarly stagnant, and even in some sense dominant, “counterculture”. I’m now critically considering what impact this cultural movement has had upon my own life and perspectives.

I also found it interesting how she indicated some positive aspects of our rebellion from maturity in the first part, which suggests that there is a careful balance that we as a culture have overshot (e.g. in terms of tolerance, multiculturalism, respect for authority, etc.).

I suspect there is a wide range of topics where “maturity” can be argued in multiple directions. I wonder if the term “maturity” isn’t actually as broad and subjective as the term “virtuous” which Diana mentioned at one point in place of “values”… which is not to say that these are not objective, but rather that people disagree.

I like her closing term “inner grownup”. Some psychotherapies employ the notion of an inner adult and an inner child, but the term “inner child” seems far more prevalent in our culture and I think some people even intend it as a synonym for one’s true self.

The subtle, statistical interplay between culture and individual behavior is a complex and fascinating topic. Hopefully, we are oscillating towards the ideal balance through all of our efforts, and presently these beneficial efforts of Diana, Michelle, et al.

Thanks for the Vent.

Kevin on September 28, 2007 at 5:06 PM

Good vent. I’ll make a point of reading the book.

I’ve recently noticed something in my friends, cousins, syblings etc. Most of us are in our 30s and were raised by baby boomers, and most of us have or are having kids now. One thing is unanimous. We are all more traditional and more strict than our parents were with us growing up.

forest on September 28, 2007 at 5:58 PM

I’ve recently noticed something in my friends, cousins, syblings etc. Most of us are in our 30s and were raised by baby boomers, and most of us have or are having kids now. One thing is unanimous. We are all more traditional and more strict than our parents were with us growing up.

forest on September 28, 2007 at 5:58 PM

I’m 27 and recently married. I can definitely notice the same backlash amongst like-minded people. But then there’s the standard narcissist 20 somethings who care about nothing but themselves and their BMWs. It’s a bimodal society.

PRCalDude on September 28, 2007 at 6:39 PM

1992 presidential debate, Pony tail Boy to Bill Clinton: “…we are your children…”
This is the legacy of the flower children, not grown-ups no conflict, no conflict no division, no division no differences. Imagine…

“I want the world to sing in perfect harmony…”

And when the old empires arise again, they won’t be as accepting. Can you say Genghis Khan?

lpierson on September 28, 2007 at 8:46 PM

Diana West’s book is important, as are Buchanan’s “Death of the West” and Steyn’s “America Alone” (which is increasingly looking less likely). But I still think Schaeffer got to the heart of the matter half a century ago.

PRCalDude on September 28, 2007 at 1:55 PM

I’ve read her columns for years. She’s always been a clear thinker. This may well be her best work. I’m going now to buy this book.

petefrt on September 28, 2007 at 10:35 PM

Multiculturalism is based upon postmodernism. This book should be a good launchpad into more research on this worldview.

Using ‘crusade’, whether purposely referring to the “Crusades” is good psychological warfare against the enemy. This crusade will NOT be lost.

ricelchew on September 29, 2007 at 3:30 AM

Using ‘crusade’, whether purposely referring to the “Crusades” is good psychological warfare against the enemy. This crusade will NOT be lost.

ricelchew on September 29, 2007 at 3:30 AM

This is the Final Crusade. There are only 2 sides. Pick one.

Connie on September 30, 2007 at 3:11 AM

yawn!

scooter on September 30, 2007 at 5:18 AM

yawn!

scooter on September 30, 2007 at 5:18 AM

Rude!

Connie on October 1, 2007 at 12:08 AM