I was so focused on the phone call yesterday that I missed this completely. The Second Amendment:

A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

The Fourth Amendment:

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

Watch for the quotation. The faux pas of taking that call may have averted political disaster.

Update: In fact, he (slightly) misquotes the Fourth Amendment too, doesn’t he? What the hell was he reading from?

Update: One of our commenters thinks Rudy’s getting a bad rap because the Second Amendment also refers to “people” and “security.” Admittedly, he’d have to be awfully stupid to confuse the two provisions, and Rudy may be many things but stupid he isn’t. The fact that he wasn’t directly quoting either amendment — his exact words before he gets cut off are, “the people shall be secure” — also tends to acquit him since if he’s only paraphrasing then he might have been on his way to saying something like, “the people shall be secure in their right to bear arms to protect their state.” That’s not what the amendment says, but creative interpretation is a far cry from being so ignorant of the Constitution that you’d mistake two core freedoms. What probably happened is that he reached for some words from memory to paraphrase the language and stumbled into a phrase he recalled as being near the beginning of the bill of rights but which wasn’t from the actual amendment he was looking for. Still embarrassing, but not as embarrassing as it may at first seem.

Update: This wasn’t the first time Rudy’s been interrupted by a call during a campaign event. Here’s the first instance, from June. It went a little better that time.