It’s Mahamu Kanneh, whom you’ll recall was accused of repeatedly molesting a little girl but sprung by a moronic Maryland judge on speedy-trial grounds when she couldn’t find an interpreter who spoke his native language — even though an interpreter was allegedly standing by and ready for trial. The appeal of that decision is still pending, but ICE, for once doing its job, isn’t waiting around.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement senior attorney Christopher R. Coxe said the agency will seek to deport Mahamu Kanneh, who was in the United States legally after being granted refugee status as a teenager, regardless of the disposition of the rape case, which is under appeal. Kanneh was arrested in 2004 on charges of raping a 7-year-old relative and abusing another child…

U.S. Immigration Judge Elizabeth A. Kessler said immigration officials revoked Kanneh’s refugee status last month. The charging document used to detain Kanneh accuses him of entering the country without inspection, but officials provided few details about his entry and refugee status. Refugees typically are able to become permanent residents and U.S. citizens.

Immigration experts said that the government routinely revokes the refugee statuses of people convicted of felonies but that it is unusual to place refugees in deportation proceedings absent a conviction…

Kanneh traveled to Philadelphia shortly after the criminal charges were dropped but was soon arrested by U.S. marshals for failing to appear at a hearing in Rockville, where the state was seeking to reinstate his bond in the rape case. Kanneh was returned to Montgomery, where a judge reinstated bond but released him. Kanneh was taken into the immigration agency’s custody Aug. 28.

This is the same issue that came up in the Carranza case when the judge granted bail inexplicably on an assault charge while Carranza was still awaiting trial for rape. ICE could have stepped in at that point and issued an immigration hold to get him off the street but because he wasn’t in their system they didn’t know he was out there. Result (allegedly): three dead college kids in Newark. They’re obviously not taking chances on the same thing happening with Kanneh. It’s worth remembering, too, just to give you a sense of the insanity on the other side of this issue, that even such otherwise sober characters as Kirsten Powers objected to the idea of an immigration hold on Carranza as a saving measure on the theory that if he was deported to Peru instead of jailed, he’d still be free to terrorize Peruvians instead of Americans. Maybe, maybe not — Lima P.D. could have dealt with him as they saw fit — but since he wasn’t in the United States legally he’s Peru’s problem to begin with. Exit question: Why should American kids have to play “the running man” with some cretin who’s not supposed to even be here?