Via the ‘Busters, whose update you’ll have to read to appreciate how quickly information travels these days between big media and blogs.

I linked the boss’s post on this yesterday but she never updated to add the Seattle Times editor’s follow-up. Yes, he admits, the media’s exceedingly liberal. But luckily, it doesn’t matter:

I ask you all to leave your personal politics at the front door for one simple reason: A good newsroom is a sacred and magical place in which we can and should test every assumption, challenge each other’s thinking, ask the fundamental questions those in power hope we will overlook.

If we wore our politics on our sleeves in here, I have no doubt that in this and in most other mainstream newsrooms in America, the majority of those sleeves would be of the same color: blue. Survey after survey over the years have demonstrated that most of the people who go into this business tend to vote Democratic, at least in national elections. That is not particularly surprising, given how people make career decisions and that social service and activism is a primary driver for many journalists

It’s not about “balance,” which is a false construct. It isn’t even about “objectivity,” which is a laudable but probably unattainable goal. It is about independent thinking and sound, facts-based journalism — the difference between what we do and the myopic screed that is passed off as “advocacy” journalism these days.

America’s priesthood, baby. Sacred. Magical. Biased — in the service of God. Is it really bias? Or just piety?

Nice job by Scarborough, though, in calling out his own side on this, even if he did neglect to note, as the boss did, that the presence of an “outside guest” in the Seattle Times’s newsroom during the high-fiving might have had something to do with the editor coming clean about it. I’m sure Matthews and Olbermann are quite dignified and restrained in their comments these days when they happen by a monitor airing the Chimphitler’s latest dispatch from Nuremberg.


Link: sevenload.com