Just what we need — another type of emission for the left to get angry about.

Butchers Pet Care could shelve plans for a factory in Coton Park, near Rugby, because angry Asian families have complained to their residents’ association about pork smells drifting into their garden.

Muslim residents in the area also claim the pork will effectively “rain down” on their homes and gardens after the factory’s 100ft chimney has pumped the meat extracts into the atmosphere…

One family who live less than 100 yards from the proposed factory, but who did not wish to be identified, said: “A significant proportion of meats used in the pet foods processes are pig meat.

“Our religion expressly forbids us to consume pig meat in any form.

“Because of the way in which this meat material will leave the factory and give that the area can be ‘rained upon’ we will be consuming pork via inhalation of this ‘rain’.

“Not only that but our clothes will be contaminated by pork.”…

A statement from Butchers Pet Care said: “The majority of our natural products are beef and poultry.

“Pork ingredients account for less than 10% of our range.

“At Coton Park we plan to introduce state-of-the-art odour extraction through the chimney stack…

“We would like to reiterate that we do not burn any animal materials.”

If the mere smell of pork is so lethally haram, how do they manage to live in England at all? One wrong turn down an unfamiliar street and they might end up outside a butcher shop. What then? Or is there some de minimis exception where trace amounts of pig smell are okay so long as it’s not, um, “raining down”?

It’ll be interesting to see how the courts handle this. In traditional tort cases, for economic reasons we don’t need to get into, the factory would be allowed to continue its business provided it paid damages to the surrounding landowners for polluting their premises. This is a little different, not only because the “pollution” here isn’t actually damaging anyone’s property but because damages aren’t going to cure the injury where religious principle is involved. Either the factory shuts down — or gives up on pork products — or the families move away. Economics dictate it’ll probably be the latter, although never underestimate the power of a good ethnic lobby.

Tags: religion