Left-wing Bush assassination fantasies take bold, graphic new turn!

posted at 9:36 am on July 23, 2007 by Allahpundit

The Brits are freer and easier about this sort of thing than our own “progressives” because they haven’t internalized the cultural fear of a visit from the Secret Service. Last year’s Bush snuff-udrama came from the UK, and now you can thank Briton Warren Ellis for this. Go read the description of the plot and be sure to enlarge that illustration of the blood-spattered Oval Office. Who’s that familiar face lying at the “hero’s” feet? Why, just the generic, unnamed president who started the generic, unnamed war that the hero took exception to. Apparently there’s a big moral quandary afterwards about whether he was right to tear the cabinet to pieces, so hey — redemption.

I prefer the way our own lefties deal with this issue: through a narcissistic delusional martyrdom complex.


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For a moment, I thought the article said Bret Easton Ellis, and my heart sank.

So the question is, will Cindy Sheehan cry plagiarism?

MadisonConservative on July 23, 2007 at 9:41 AM

And to think, we rarely have anything poor to say about their government. But Christ help the American who proposes a comic that, for any reason whatsoever, tears through 10 Downing Street or Buckingham Palace with, say, an axe.

Spc Steve on July 23, 2007 at 9:44 AM

You always know the comic writers — any genre writers, really — are frothing left-wing looneytunes, but when you’re confronted with such grotesque evidence of it … it always stings a bit.

Il Padrino on July 23, 2007 at 9:52 AM

Warren Ellis is a great writer, but he’s such a freaking liberal kook that I had stop reading his stuff years back. The guy is as unhinged as they come.

Mindcrime on July 23, 2007 at 9:54 AM

Which is a shame, because before Transmetropolitan got bogged down in the ultimately uninteresting and anticlimactic showdown between Spider Jeruslamen and The Smiler (replete with stupid political points, tasteless parallels to real world events, and endless splash pages that made each issue take about 5 minutes to read), it was absolutely one of the best hard-sf comics ever written.

Il Padrino on July 23, 2007 at 9:59 AM

You always know the comic writers — any genre writers, really — are frothing left-wing looneytunes

Actually, you’d be surprised. Frank Miller, one of the most prolific comic artists of our time, has presented both sides very well. Pick up The Dark Knight Returns for a fantastic allegory on reality vs. politics vs. psychology. He’s right now working on a book called Holy Terror, Batman!, in which he fights Al Qaeda in Gotham.

Another comforting note: Alan Moore, writer of V for Vendetta, when interviewed about the movie, said he hated it, saying that it had been turned into a Democratic agenda flick against the current administration, when it was intended to be completely independent of both parties.

MadisonConservative on July 23, 2007 at 10:01 AM

Frank Miller is the exception to the rule. And if Holy Terror, Batman! ever gets published, I will eat my hat. I’ll do it cheerfully, but I don’t anticipate an emergency trip to the haberdasher anytime soon. And I’ve always been on the fence about Miller, because although I adore The Dark Knight Returns, Ronin, and his run on Daredevil, I’ve always hated how he portrayed Reagan. Small potatoes compared to his sterling remarks on the War on Terror, I know, but it sticks in my craw.

And don’t be comforted by anything Alan Moore says or does. He has, I think, disowned every project of his that ever made it to the big screen (and in the cases of FROM HELL and LEAGUE OF EXTRAORDINARY GENTLEMEN, who can blame him?) … but he is a committed Anarchist, and no fan of either American or British conservatism.

Il Padrino on July 23, 2007 at 10:04 AM

This is their attempt to get back at us for the movie “King Ralph”.

.

GT on July 23, 2007 at 10:11 AM

“Because I do this for the children,” Ellis says slyly.

Kind of says it all, doesn’t it?

SicSemperTyrannus on July 23, 2007 at 10:17 AM

The moment i realized it was a comic book i knew Warren Ellis had to be behind it. There just isn’t a bigger left wing looney toon in the comic industry. Well, if you forget Millar that is.
That’s why, in general, i prefer manga to western comics. They don’t get bogged down in politics nearly as often, and when they do go political, they have a much more centrist (heck, in some cases downright rightist) view.

madne0 on July 23, 2007 at 10:25 AM

genre writers [...] are frothing left-wing looneytunes

A lot of science fiction writers tend libertarian.

jic on July 23, 2007 at 10:26 AM

jic:

Eh. Maybe I spoke too soon. I just always think of the shaft Heinlein repeatedly got, and the fact that admirers of his had to create an entirely new awards program to recognize his enormous contribution to sf.

Il Padrino on July 23, 2007 at 10:33 AM

Funny how Ellis takes a swipe at our evil president, while completely overlooking the ticking time bomb that is Great Britain.

Instead of writing fiction about how he perceives our great nation he should write a non-fiction novel about the simmering Muslim threat about to overtake his once great nation.

fogw on July 23, 2007 at 10:35 AM

Childish. Simply, Childish.

They accuse us of being “cool-aid drinkers”. When they can’t win, they Wish We Were Dead! Childish behavior.

Grow Up, Libz. You may get respect that way. Or not.

Mazztek on July 23, 2007 at 10:47 AM

Il Padrino on July 23, 2007 at 10:33 AM

I just always think of the shaft Heinlein repeatedly got

Explain what you mean by the “shaft Heinlein repeatedly got” and I’ll tell you about the two hours I spent talking to him.

doriangrey on July 23, 2007 at 10:57 AM

Three comments:

1. It was hard to tell from the photo, but it looked like the WH was wiped out by Mr. Bubble. Is that the best he can do for a super hero?

2. He is taking out the president for an “illegal war” that cost a number of lives in the four digits. Hm. Nothing about ousting a dictator and trying to squash a movement that had cost a number of lives in six digits, and would have continued.

3. Superman would kick Mr. Bubbles ass and then plant an American flag up his hole.

Mallard T. Drake on July 23, 2007 at 11:14 AM

doriangrey:

Wasn’t there some controversy surrounding Heinlein — that the establishment in the sf genre simply refused to award his work because of his politics?

Il Padrino on July 23, 2007 at 11:26 AM

The world of comic books is an odd one indeed, and, although I know it’s historically had a left-wing tilt, the particularly Moonbat tilt of the last several years finally pushed me away entirely. Every now and then you’ll find a writer or artist with a remotely sensible head on their shoulders, but for every Colleen Doran, there are ten raving leftist morons like Ellis or Ed Brubaker or Alex Ross.

Even seemingly down to earth guys like Brian Michael Bendis disappoint (back during the 2004 election season, Bendis pimped agressively on his message board for John Kerry, citing Fahrenheit 9/11 as evidence of Bush’s incompetence.) Bendis’s board also hosts a variety of Truthers and assassination enthusiasts.

But even beyond the overt politics, comics nowadays are routinely steeped in cynicism and anti-Americanism. It’s no wonder the audience tends to skew Moonbat. The only question is whether comics are simply preaching to the choir or, in fact, creating converts. My guess would be the latter, and it’s a shame.

Kensington on July 23, 2007 at 11:27 AM

Ah, those peace and love embracing liberals! They sure are intellectually consistent, aren’t they?

The only people more in tune with the name of their organization are the followers of the Religion of Peace. Now there’s some peace-loving, tolerant folks!

Out of curiosity … is it just an inevitable facet of left-leaning lunatics to always behave in exactly the opposite way of what they claim to believe?

It reminds me of the old not-so-funny joke about all the communist totalitarian regimes that had the word “democratic” (or something similar) in their country’s official name. The German Democratic Republic, etc. Is this like some secret left-wing code or something?

If that questions too abstract … how about this one: do lefties ever carry out their infantile hate-fantasies to their inevitable logical conclusion? Do they even realize what would really happen in a mass assassination of Bush administration officials?

Let’s just say that it wouldn’t bring about the next Age of Aquarius. Especially not if they missed Dick Cheney.

Professor Blather on July 23, 2007 at 11:28 AM

Alan Moore, writer of V for Vendetta, when interviewed about the movie, said he hated it, saying that it had been turned into a Democratic agenda flick against the current administration, when it was intended to be completely independent of both parties.

MadisonConservative on July 23, 2007 at 10:01 AM

Got a link? I’d love to read that!

Frank Miller is the exception to the rule. And if Holy Terror, Batman! ever gets published, I will eat my hat. I’ll do it cheerfully, but I don’t anticipate an emergency trip to the haberdasher anytime soon.
Il Padrino on July 23, 2007 at 10:04 AM

And the award for best, first, and only use of the word “haberdasher” in any blog post in history goes to …

Professor Blather on July 23, 2007 at 11:32 AM

Actually, you’d be surprised. Frank Miller, one of the most prolific comic artists of our time, has presented both sides very well…He’s right now working on a book called Holy Terror, Batman!, in which he fights Al Qaeda in Gotham.

Miller is (or at least was) a fairly leftish guy who took 9/11 rather personally. His pre-9/11 work was more anti-establishment than liberal, I suppose, but one certainly gets a certain flavor from “The Dark Knight,” and it wasn’t what one might call “Reagan Conservative.”

Meanwhile, last I heard, DC had nixxed the Batman vs. Al Qaeda project. Apparently it was a bit too “insensitive” for those on the editorial staff (which speaks volumes about the decision makers at DC).

And other than Miller, you really wouldn’t be surprised. The comics industry is a haven for moonbats. There might be a conservative here or there, but if he makes any noise about it he’s either out of work or self-publishing.

Blacklake on July 23, 2007 at 11:32 AM

Another comforting note: Alan Moore, writer of V for Vendetta, when interviewed about the movie, said he hated it, saying that it had been turned into a Democratic agenda flick against the current administration, when it was intended to be completely independent of both parties.

Don’t be fooled by this. Alan Moore is a foolish a liberal as they come. His beef with V for Vendetta isn’t because it was too liberal, but rather because, by championing conservatives (read Democrats), it was too conservative.

Kensington on July 23, 2007 at 11:32 AM

The only question is whether comics are simply preaching to the choir or, in fact, creating converts. My guess would be the latter, and it’s a shame.

Kensington on July 23, 2007 at 11:27 AM

I don’t think kids read comics anymore. The target audience tends to be college-aged or older. So that’s probably just preaching to the choir.

Unfortunately, a lot of the stuff gets optioned for film, which might reach a broader audience (though I think kids these days are increasingly more interested in video games than movies).

Blacklake on July 23, 2007 at 11:36 AM

Oh, Mama, let’s try that again. My 11:32 a.m. post should have read as follows:

Don’t be fooled by this. Alan Moore is as foolish a liberal as they come. His beef with the tedious V for Vendetta isn’t because it’s too liberal. Rather, by ultimately villifying a Bush figure, it ends up championing Democrats and thus is too conservative.

Kensington on July 23, 2007 at 11:37 AM

That said and understood: the superhero genre, which I now have to spend a lot of time thinking about because I now have a role at Marvel as sort of the creepy inventor guy in the basement, is clearly entering something of a decadent phase.

Entering the decadent phase… talk about understatement of the year!

3. Superman would kick Mr. Bubbles ass and then plant an American flag up his hole.

Mallard T. Drake on July 23, 2007 at 11:14 AM

Heh!

4shoes on July 23, 2007 at 11:39 AM

I don’t think kids read comics anymore. The target audience tends to be college-aged or older. So that’s probably just preaching to the choir.
Although comics have also become prohibitively expensive for younger readers, there are still plenty of jaded 14-16 year olds on the message board posting their comic-influenced BDS blatherins. Nothing like a 13-year-old crowing about how stupid Bush is.

Kensington on July 23, 2007 at 11:40 AM

It’s been turned into a Bush-era parable by people too timid to set a political satire in their own country. In my original story there had been a limited nuclear war, which had isolated Britain, caused a lot of chaos and a collapse of government, and a fascist totalitarian dictatorship had sprung up. Now, in the film, you’ve got a sinister group of right-wing figures — not fascists, but you know that they’re bad guys — and what they have done is manufactured a bio-terror weapon in secret, so that they can fake a massive terrorist incident to get everybody on their side, so that they can pursue their right-wing agenda. It’s a thwarted and frustrated and perhaps largely impotent American liberal fantasy of someone with American liberal values [standing up] against a state run by neo-conservatives — which is not what “V for Vendetta” was about.

Alan Moore:

http://www.mtv.com/shared/movies/interviews/m/moore_alan_060315/

MadisonConservative on July 23, 2007 at 11:58 AM

They’re pissed because we’re the only superpower anymore. Couple that with the fact their parents didn’t pay them enough attention and voila! You have the US playing mom and dad to the rest of the world, and a bunch of emotionally stunted people who will do anything to get a rise out of mom and dad. That’s all it is.

Nothing like a 13-year-old crowing about how stupid Bush is.

I always find it ironic when celebrities call Bush stupid, then they say that he conned them into voting for the Iraq war. Okay, so if he’s stupid and he conned the Dems into voting for the war, what does that make them?

foxforce91 on July 23, 2007 at 12:05 PM

As long as Republicans discourage study of the arts, shun any career path/tangible product that doesn’t immediately make them money, and refuse to engage in pop culture debates other than whining when the entrenched liberal artists kick them in the scrotum (again), this shouldn’t be surprising.

It’s really hypocritical when Republicans and conservatives complain about how Those Darn Liberals(tm) are runining the world with their filthy media oferings but those same Republicans and conservatives are the ones who never want to part with their blood or treasure over esoteric things like funding TV shows, cartoons, games, and other influential media.

ScottMcC on July 23, 2007 at 12:08 PM

Il Padrino on July 23, 2007 at 11:26 AM

Wasn’t there some controversy surrounding Heinlein — that the establishment in the sf genre simply refused to award his work because of his politics?

Controversy surrounding him yes, refused to award his work because of his politics no. He was widely recognized as one of the great pillars of science fiction receiving a total of 8 Hugo Awards. Politically he was an interesting mix of Libertarian and Marxist.

When I was in high school The San Diego Natural History Museum held a science fiction writers symposium. Robert Heinlein, Isaac Asimov, Arther C. Clark, David Niven and Greg Bear all came and spoke.

There were about 200 of us who were fortunate enough to be in attendance, the lectures were about 3 hours long. I caught hell for what happened the day Robert spoke but do not regret it one iota.

The San Diego Natural History Museum is located about 1/4 mile from the worlds famous San Diego Zoo. Robert made mention of this fact while lecturing and said that he planned on visiting it after the lecture, so I “escaped” from my school sponsored field trip and spent the afternoon walking around the Zoo with him.

It was a heady and enlightening experience. He was to say the very least distrustful of bureaucracies, regardless of their political ideology. The more any government intruded on the life of its citizens the less he like it. You can see this theme in many of his books. He also felt that each citizen had a very strong obligation to the society they lived in.

Like I said, an odd mix of Libertarian and Marxist, he himself was a genuinely kind and caring individual. The very first person I ever met with the thousand yard stare.

doriangrey on July 23, 2007 at 12:12 PM

ScottMcC on July 23, 2007 at 12:08 PM

A little early in the morning to be hitting the crack pipe dont you think?

doriangrey on July 23, 2007 at 12:20 PM

doriangrey:

That is absolutely fascinating. I really envy the opportunity you had to hear him speak; so many of the old greats are gone now. But it was my understanding the Hugos were invented largely for his benefit, as he was simply never going to get the Nebula — am I thinking of someone else? Or am I just radically misinformed?

Il Padrino on July 23, 2007 at 12:23 PM

This will be a nice change of pace for the hate-filled left, who have been busy wishing cancer on a certain someone for the past few days.

BohicaTwentyTwo on July 23, 2007 at 12:24 PM

Il Padrino on July 23, 2007 at 12:23 PM

Or am I just radically misinformed?

Just misinformed, the Hugo’s were created in 1953, Nebula’s in 1965.

doriangrey on July 23, 2007 at 12:31 PM

Huh. Geeze. False premises lead to looking foolish yet again.

Well, I’ll take comfort in the fact that “Starship Troopers” would give Chia Mieville hives.

Il Padrino on July 23, 2007 at 12:34 PM

Or China Mieville, even.

Il Padrino on July 23, 2007 at 12:34 PM

ScottMcC is right, we need to be working harder to encourage arts and development of them on the right.

Bad Candy on July 23, 2007 at 12:39 PM

Yawn. As someone above said, things like this is why everyone reads manga these days. Its not just insane left wing screeching, its boring and predictable too. Luckily kids these days are growing up with Naruto and Pokemon which teach that hard work and perseverance win the day. Sad that you have to go to foreign shows to get that lesson…

Etain P on July 23, 2007 at 12:45 PM

ScottMcC on July 23, 2007 at 12:08 PM

A little early in the morning to be hitting the crack pipe dont you think?

doriangrey on July 23, 2007 at 12:20 PM

No, he’s right, insofar as conservatives should involve themselves more agressively in the arts. There is a culture war, and too many of us stay on the sidelines.

I think it’s a little goofy of him to reduce that reluctance to engage down to economic terms, but the overall point is valid.

Kensington on July 23, 2007 at 12:51 PM

Il Padrino on July 23, 2007 at 12:34 PM

Starship Troopers is an excellently example of Robert Heinlein’s belief that every individual owed a dept and responsibility to the society that they lived in.

Once you see the bugs not as an actual physical enemy to be fought but as a series of philosophical social ills the catch phrase “Citizenship has it privileges” begins to make much more sense.

In Robert Heinlein’s mind the phrase “If you are not part of the solution you are the problem” was very much a maxim. He really did believe that if you did not engage in the political process you really did not deserve the right to criticize the government that you saddled yourself with.

He hated governments that tried to take over every aspect of their citizens lives and believe that the only way to prevent any government from doing this was for its citizens to be engaged in politics at a personal level.

He believed that the more each citizen was engaged in the social fabric dealing with issues on a personal level the less likely they were to believe that a faceless bureaucratic entity could solve their problems and the less likely they would be to abdicate their personal responsibility to some faceless governmental bureaucracy.

doriangrey on July 23, 2007 at 12:57 PM

Bad Candy on July 23, 2007 at 12:39 PM
Kensington on July 23, 2007 at 12:51 PM

I hope neither one of you are forgetting that I am an artist and a conservative. Believe me if anyone understands the need for conservatives to promote the arts its me.

That not withstanding ScottMcC’s little diatribe does nothing what so ever to further that goal. It was nothing but a gratuitous assault on republicans and conservatives for no other reason than insulting republicans and conservatives.

doriangrey on July 23, 2007 at 1:04 PM

These people are sick and should be locked up.

congsan on July 23, 2007 at 1:23 PM

I hope neither one of you are forgetting that I am an artist and a conservative.

Forgetting? I don’t know who you are. You’re an artist? Great, but I don’t make a point of studying the pedigrees of commenters, quite frankly, and wouldn’t presume that anyone knows who I am, either.

But as for ScottMcC’s comment, I, too, at first took it the way you did, but upon a second reading, I really don’t think its point is easily dismissed. Maybe it was an assault, but I still think it’s reasonable to criticize conservatives for not being engaged enough in the arts and culture war.

Kensington on July 23, 2007 at 1:26 PM

Kensington on July 23, 2007 at 1:26 PM

I like to know a little something about those I converse with so I make a point of checking out the links to peoples homepages. If you consider musicians to be artists then yes I am a artist. Some people would say not a very good one, but thats pretty subjective. Time for a shameless self plug obviously, hopefully Bad Candy and Slubog will forgive me since it is somewhat post related…

Doriangrey the Musician/Artist

doriangrey on July 23, 2007 at 1:40 PM

doriangrey on July 23, 2007 at 1:40 PM

No worries; I’ll pop you into my iPod and give it a listen. :-)

Kensington on July 23, 2007 at 1:49 PM

Kensington on July 23, 2007 at 1:49 PM

Well, you’ll either like it or you wont. … :o

doriangrey on July 23, 2007 at 1:56 PM

Kens and Candy are absolutely right: This isn’t an assault but a wake-up call for Republicans and conservatives to embrace the arts while remaining true to ourselves.

The economic argument that Republicans generally don’t put money into the arts is very VERY real. Other than Philip Anschutz, what conservative rich guy spends his money to make video entertainment that is accessible and available for a broad audience? McCaw may have built an opera house outside Seattle, but how many water-cooler or lunchroom conversations are about the lead tenor in last night’s productions of La Traviata?

No, real people tend to discuss The Soprano’s rather than the tenors. And conservatives/Republicans with the money needed to fund pop culture-influencing productions need to not be so stingy with that money.

All a Democrat cares about is how government can change the lives of everyone. Democrats use the liberal arts to help prime the public to give government the power to make those societal changes. Republicans don’t give a crap about government because they want less of it in their lives.

Republicans DO care about money–for example, I want to learn how to make it, how I can hide it from the government I despise, etc.–so I often need to frame my pleas to fellow Republicans for better corporate engagement with the arts and pop culture in economic terms. If it comes across as an assault, then so be it.

Time to shake things up and get things done or we’ll be forever stuck with dumbass liberal “art” forever.

ScottMcC on July 23, 2007 at 2:52 PM

The world of comic books is an odd one indeed, and, although I know it’s historically had a left-wing tilt, the particularly Moonbat tilt of the last several years finally pushed me away entirely. Every now and then you’ll find a writer or artist with a remotely sensible head on their shoulders, but for every Colleen Doran, there are ten raving leftist morons like Ellis or Ed Brubaker or Alex Ross.

Even seemingly down to earth guys like Brian Michael Bendis disappoint (back during the 2004 election season, Bendis pimped agressively on his message board for John Kerry, citing Fahrenheit 9/11 as evidence of Bush’s incompetence.) Bendis’s board also hosts a variety of Truthers and assassination enthusiasts.

But even beyond the overt politics, comics nowadays are routinely steeped in cynicism and anti-Americanism. It’s no wonder the audience tends to skew Moonbat. The only question is whether comics are simply preaching to the choir or, in fact, creating converts. My guess would be the latter, and it’s a shame.

Kensington on July 23, 2007 at 11:27 AM

You should give “The Walking Dead” by Robert Kirkman. Not only is it very well written (and about Zombies, can’t go wrong with zombies), it definitely has a libertarian/conservative bent. Not too in your face, but it’s there.

madne0 on July 23, 2007 at 2:59 PM

I meant to say “You should give “The Walking Dead” by Robert Kirkman a try
Sorry bout that.

madne0 on July 23, 2007 at 3:00 PM

ScottMcC on July 23, 2007 at 2:52 PM

If this is really and truly your aim, then boy are you going about it the wrong way. If you want conservative/republicans to support the arts you need to think about what motivates them. Very few people are motivated by being insulted.

doriangrey on July 23, 2007 at 3:06 PM

You should give “The Walking Dead” by Robert Kirkman. Not only is it very well written (and about Zombies, can’t go wrong with zombies), it definitely has a libertarian/conservative bent. Not too in your face, but it’s there.

I read the first Walking Dead collection but don’t remember it all that well. Maybe I’ll see if the library has a few more volumes of it.

That said, I’ve noticed a lot of lefty praise for the book, so I suspect it can’t have the kind of conservative bent that would really get me enthusiastic. Seems to me that, at least in the comic world, the line between liberal and libertarian is much thinner than the line between libertarian and conservative.

Kensington on July 23, 2007 at 3:15 PM

Kensington on July 23, 2007 at 3:15 PM

They people who write comics are neither liberal nor libertarian, their lunatics…

doriangrey on July 23, 2007 at 3:31 PM

Horus dresses his “super hero” in a trench coat, I see. Seems more appropriate for a super villain or mass murderer. Go figure.

abinitioadinfinitum on July 23, 2007 at 3:32 PM

If you want to sample Warren Ellis’ best work, without most of the nutball political stuff, try “Planetary”. It’s a wonderfully clever premise – a team of archaeologists, in the Indiana Jones mold but with superhuman powers, exploring the secret history of a world where everything from the 30s pulp stories, 50s monster movies, and 60s comic books actually happened, but the public was largely kept in the dark. It’s a dark, twisted, cynical setting, but so over-the-top that I didn’t feel any radioactivity from moonbat politics when I read it.

I’ve read comics since college, on and off, and I always thought the far-left tendencies of comic writers were curious, since most of their classic characters were created during the patriotic Greatest Generation and the fundamentally conservative 50s, by people who modern liberals would have considered reactionaries. Superman is basically wearing an American flag, after all, even if modern comics writers have managed to dispense with his “truth, justice, and the American Way” ethos, or turned it into a post-modern joke. The vigilante justice that most comics superheroes pursue doesn’t square very well with liberal theories on crime and punishment. You don’t see Batman cutting his enemies a break because they come from troubled childhoods or impoverished neighborhoods. The Bush-asassination fantasy from Ellis is especially inconsistent with the idea he tried to push in his other big superhero comic, “The Authority”, in which a band of superheroes decided to abandon the traditional superhero respect for civilian governments and basically takes over the planet for its own good, ruthlessly wiping out anyone who gets in their way. Their first adventure even involves a bit of regime change against the head of a terrorist state, and it’s presented as a great moral victory. I guess overthrowing tyrants is one of those things that’s only evil when conservatives do it…

Doctor Zero on July 23, 2007 at 4:00 PM

The impotent in pursuit of the unscathed.

And too cowardly to confront the true tyrants of our time, for fear of losing their head.

*~@):~{>

Typical craven clucking to comfort their own apoplexy.

profitsbeard on July 23, 2007 at 4:09 PM

doriangrey on July 23, 2007 at 1:40 PM

If I don’t forgive, it’s only because you’re a vastly superior guitarist.

Dang it.

Slublog on July 23, 2007 at 4:26 PM

Superior to me, I mean.

And that’s all that counts. I’m a strummer and my fingers simply cannot dance up the fretboard.

Slublog on July 23, 2007 at 4:31 PM

Slublog on July 23, 2007 at 4:31 PM

Oh $hit, I think I need a beer now…Not sure if that was genuinely a complement or not, I am going to pretend that it was and say thank you.

doriangrey on July 23, 2007 at 4:36 PM

Oh $hit, I think I need a beer now…Not sure if that was genuinely a complement or not, I am going to pretend that it was and say thank you.
doriangrey on July 23, 2007 at 4:36 PM

It was. Nice guitar work.

Slublog on July 23, 2007 at 4:42 PM

I read the first Walking Dead collection but don’t remember it all that well. Maybe I’ll see if the library has a few more volumes of it.

That said, I’ve noticed a lot of lefty praise for the book, so I suspect it can’t have the kind of conservative bent that would really get me enthusiastic. Seems to me that, at least in the comic world, the line between liberal and libertarian is much thinner than the line between libertarian and conservative.

Kensington on July 23, 2007 at 3:15 PM

Like i said, the politics aren’t “in your face”, but i’d be hard pressed to find the writers views on guns (at least as expressed in the comic) as anything less then right of center.

madne0 on July 23, 2007 at 4:51 PM

If this is really and truly your aim, then boy are you going about it the wrong way. If you want conservative/republicans to support the arts you need to think about what motivates them. Very few people are motivated by being insulted.

doriangrey on July 23, 2007 at 3:06 PM

Principled Republicans do not espouse the “Those Darn Liberals(tm) with their coddling kids by abolishing grades in schools and telling them everyone is equal are destroying our society! What we need is to be honest, toughen up, and learn the reality that there are winners and losers in the world! No whiners! I hate all this commie socialist ‘greater good’ collectivist crap! You gotta fight for it! RAH RAH RAH!” rugged individualist philosophy and then get huffy when a fellow Republican endorses conflict with the status quo as a means to resolve an issue.

Since I’m so obviously wrong and a big meanie, how would YOU motivate the current generation of poetry girl and gamer boy teens to go Republican and stick with novel writing and movie making as their top career choices?

ScottMcC on July 23, 2007 at 4:59 PM

ScottMcC on July 23, 2007 at 4:59 PM

Since I’m so obviously wrong and a big meanie, how would YOU motivate the current generation of poetry girl and gamer boy teens to go Republican and stick with novel writing and movie making as their top career choices?

Simple, make it profitable. As you pointed out, Republicans/conservatives are financially motivated. You want Republicans/conservatives to back the arts, offer them a fat and easy to use tax write-off for funding artistic projects and they will line up around the block.

Republicans/conservatives don’t object to the arts, they hate funding art that offends them. They want a say in what is considered good acceptable art. Let them fund the art they choose and give them incentive to do so and they will.

doriangrey on July 23, 2007 at 5:10 PM

Doctor Zero makes a good point about the Authority vs. this latest Warren Ellis abortion. As I recall, not only did the Authority overthrow some third-world despot, but they even told off Bill Clinton when he threatened them for intervening in another government’s affairs. Yeah, regime change is only good when a bunch of guys in tights do it.

Jim Treacher on July 23, 2007 at 5:14 PM

I prefer the way our own lefties deal with this issue: through a narcissistic delusional martyrdom complex.

Not to nitpick, but Mark Millar is also a British funny book writer. Apparently the editorial board at DC hired their lefties across the pond to be our lefties.

Lefty outsourcing! I’m outrageously outraged!

ScottMcC on July 23, 2007 at 5:33 PM

Frank Herbert seems stronger, deeper, more evil, and more beautiful than the heap of all other writers of fantastic and futuristic fiction. In Herbert’s Dune novels, I find problems and insights I’ve otherwise found only in the writings of Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Nietzsche, and the Straussians. The Dune novels are valuable preparation for those others. “I assure you I am the book of fate,” says the Worm, and I would prefer to give Moneo’s retort to one who would say otherwise.

Kralizec on July 23, 2007 at 9:34 PM

As long as Republicans discourage study of the arts, shun any career path/tangible product that doesn’t immediately make them money, and refuse to engage in pop culture debates other than whining when the entrenched liberal artists kick them in the scrotum (again), this shouldn’t be surprising.

It’s really hypocritical when Republicans and conservatives complain about how Those Darn Liberals(tm) are runining the world with their filthy media oferings but those same Republicans and conservatives are the ones who never want to part with their blood or treasure over esoteric things like funding TV shows, cartoons, games, and other influential media.

ScottMcC on July 23, 2007 at 12:08 PM

ScottMcC, you don’t know or even suspect the first thing about the ambitions of the most thoughtful people on the Right. To judge from the easy, common opinions you’ve repeated here, they transcend your remotest imaginings, you noisy parakeet.

Kralizec on July 23, 2007 at 10:08 PM

ScottMcC, you don’t know or even suspect the first thing about the ambitions of the most thoughtful people on the Right. To judge from the easy, common opinions you’ve repeated here, they transcend your remotest imaginings, you noisy parakeet.

Kralizec on July 23, 2007 at 10:08 PM

Prove I’m wrong with the long list of Republicans and political conservative influencers in our current pop culture. Proof will be when you provide five names of avowed and vocal Republican and/or politically conservative working and living artists in each of the following categories:

-CURRENT WRITERS OF NETWORK TELEVISION FILMED OR VIDEO ENTERTAINMENT-
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

-CURRENT PERFORMERS OF SCRIPTED CABLE TELEVISION FILMED OR VIDEO ENTERTAINMENT-
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

-CINEMATIC ENTERTAINMENT PRODUCERS CURRENTLY UNDER CONTRACT WITH ONE OF THE TOP FIVE MAJOR MOVIE STUDIOS-
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

-TOURING COMEDIANS CAPABLE OF HEADLINING 1,000+ SEAT THEATERS-
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

-FICTION NOVELISTS WITH WORKS IN THE NYT BEST SELLERS LIST-
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

-POP/ROCK MUSIC ARTISTS CURRENTLY CHARTING WITH PLATINUM OR BETTER SALES ACCORDING TO BILLBOARD MAGAZINE-
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

-VIDEO GAME DESIGNERS (ANY PLATFORM) WITH SALES OF 1+ MILLION UNITS OR CURRENTLY CHARTING AS PER NPD RETAIL-
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Refusal to answer this list with some variation of the pompous “Those lists are not the real influencers of our culture” cop out, will result in an embarrassing and humiliating forfeit to this challenge.

Provide 5 names for each of the lists and I’ll forget that for all your big talk of intellect on our side, you lost your cool and hypocritically resorted to ad hominem attacks against me.

ScottMcC on July 24, 2007 at 1:18 AM

Your link does not work anymore. I now get this -

There seems to have been a problem with the database.
Please try again by clicking the Refresh button in your web browser.

An E-Mail has been dispatched to our Technical Staff, whom you can also contact if the problem persists.

We apologise for any inconvenience.

Strange coincidence eh?

Suihei Deloi on July 24, 2007 at 2:37 AM

Prove I’m wrong with the long list of Republicans and political conservative influencers in our current pop culture. Proof will be when you provide five names of avowed and vocal Republican and/or politically conservative working and living artists in each of the following categories: …

Refusal to answer this list with some variation of the pompous “Those lists are not the real influencers of our culture” cop out, will result in an embarrassing and humiliating forfeit to this challenge.

Provide 5 names for each of the lists and I’ll forget that for all your big talk of intellect on our side, you lost your cool and hypocritically resorted to ad hominem attacks against me.

ScottMcC on July 24, 2007 at 1:18 AM

I’ll get the “embarrassing and humiliating forfeit” of your tedious homework assignment out of the way first, ScottMcC. A long list of “influencers in [sic] current pop culture” would have a bearing on my point only if I shared the opinion that mass influence, the popular culture, and “the current” are good preoccupations for the most thoughtful human beings on the Right. But this is the very point on which I’ve tried to correct you once already, and not because you’re very important, but because your opinion becomes poisonous if it infects the attention of those who are capable of higher things than chasing influence over popular culture.

As for ad hominem attacks on you, you’re right that they’re beside the point. I already know and haven’t forgotten; they don’t serve by refuting your opinion, but serve by eroding vulgar acquiescence in your opinion, stemming from vulgar admiration for you. My “cool” doesn’t matter, so I’ll pass over it to my “hypocrisy,” which, come to think of it, doesn’t matter either, at least in the way you somehow imagine. You seemed to be just the sort of contemporary man who would confidently raise a claim of hypocrisy as if it would obviously be a bad thing. I’ll be authentic for a moment and openly invite you to consider the question of the worth of hypocrisy. Here’s a hint: It’s usually best considered inwardly instead of outwardly. Also, it might bear some relation to art, which you seem to love more than to understand. Even the man who said the artists lie too much implied thereby that he couldn’t reasonably expect them to stop lying altogether.

Kralizec on July 24, 2007 at 5:26 AM

A long list of “influencers in [sic] current pop culture” would have a bearing on my point only if I shared the opinion that mass influence, the popular culture, and “the current” are good preoccupations for the most thoughtful human beings on the Right. But this is the very point on which I’ve tried to correct you once already, and not because you’re very important, but because your opinion becomes poisonous if it infects the attention of those who are capable of higher things than chasing influence over popular culture.

Yeah, here’s a subtle little reminder to all humans aged 18-34 reading this: The reason 99.9% of you despise all Republicans and conservatives in general is that they are very often going to spout incredibly pompous, detached polemics against the novels, magazines, music, movies, and web videos you choose to spend your time and money on (and therefore influence your thoughts and actions) as quoted above.

You heard the man, conservatives! We’ve lost but that’s okay because we’re just better than them with their “cool” and “hypocrisy” and their “scare quotes” around their “words.” We should be behind the Mighty Mindwall rather than engage with the squishy-minded rabble on a physical or visceral level. Hey, how ’bout we all take up speaking Latin?

Let’s get inward!
Wooooo-HOOOOO!

ScottMcC on July 24, 2007 at 12:57 PM