It’s come to this, my friends. Having been routed this morning on the Senate floor, the open-borders shills at the WSJ turn, as they must, to vengeful, vintage-nutroots conspiracy smears. From the people who brought you the feelgood slander video of the year:

Hot Air Network’s Web ad … urged “conservatives fed up with Republican scheming on this bill, [to] do something about it. If you gave to the party in the past year, you can demand your money back. Call the Republican National Committee today and demand a full refund. If you gave to any senator or congressman in the past year, call their office and demand a full refund.” Just who sponsors Hot Air’s ad, and other similar ads popping up across the Internet, is unclear.

That paragraph refers to this ad, which, FYI, cost us $300,000 to produce. Today’s Brownback spot cost $450K, but that’s only because Bryan suddenly upped his voiceover rates overnight. Thank goodness our secret backer can cover it.

And to think, MM claims she can’t afford to buy me an iPhone.

Exit question: Might there be … New York money people behind this? MM owes us an answer.

Update: MM answers.

Update: We don’t use DV for the ads but otherwise, spot on.

Update: That didn’t take long.

Hot Air Network’s Web ad, embedded below, urged “conservatives fed up with Republican scheming on this bill, [to] do something about it. If you gave to the party in the past year, you can demand your money back. Call the Republican National Committee today and demand a full refund. If you gave to any senator or congressman in the past year, call their office and demand a full refund.” Hot Air is a conservative online broadcast site run by blogger Michelle Malkin…

Correction: An earlier version of this post said it wasn’t clear who produced the Hot Air ads.

Update (BP): Actually, we do use DV. But no tape. Figure that one out, WSJ.

Just in time for this week, we did deploy an advanced new weapon that the crack reporting staff at the WSJ might want to look into, if they’re of a mind to actually ask questions of those of us involved. I’m not going to give them the plans or any access to my new battle station, but I’ll divulge its code name. I call it the Gateway. It’s fresh from our super-shadowy digital guerrilla gear pipeline known only as “Tiger Direct.”