Lone Star Dhimmis?

posted at 1:47 pm on April 6, 2007 by Bryan

As a Texan, you have no idea how painful this post is for me to write. To me, Texas is the standard-bearer of what’s right about the US. Texas is individualistic in a sea of collectivism. It’s conscious of right and wrong in a sea of relativism. It’s traditional in a sea of post-modernism. It’s staunchly conservative in an age of creeping liberalism.

But, alas, Texas is not entirely immune to the winds of the times.

Remember that radical-tinged imam who prayed a noxious prayer at the Democrats’ winter meeting a while back? Well, he has an ally who graced the Texas Senate with similar incantations this week. His name is Imam Yusuf Kavakci of the Dallas Central Mosque, and he was invited by a bi-partisan pair for the invocation. Follow the link; he’s a Khomeini apologist among other things. Here’s audio of the first part of his prayer, courtesy a Hot Air reader and WBAP radio, arguably the best talk station in the state.

Robert Spencer interpreted this little ditty the following day:

The Fatiha asks Allah: “Show us the straight path, the path of those whom Thou hast favoured; not the (path) of those who earn Thine anger nor of those who go astray.” The traditional Islamic understanding of this is that the “straight path” is Islam — cf. Islamic apologist John Esposito’s book Islam: The Straight Path. The path of those who have earned Allah’s anger are the Jews, and those who have gone astray are the Christians.

Robert has the sources to back it all up, as he always does. Dave in Texas found the spectacle of a radical imam praying in the state capitol appalling. One state senator, conservative Republican Sen. Dan Patrick, walked out on the event and has been chastised by the local press for it. That the inviting senator is liberal Republican Florence Shapiro surprises me not at all. I covered her first race for the senate, back in 1992. A staunch Republican, I ended up voting for the pot smoking Libertarian. At least I really knew what he was all about.

That this happened in Texas is best explained that it actually happened in Austin, Berkeley in all but name, and at the instigation of a liberal transplant to the Lone Star State. But still. It ain’t good.


Related Posts:

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

Hope he gets a texas punishment

Defector01 on April 6, 2007 at 1:51 PM

I didn’t live in Plano long enough to vote against Shapiro, but there’s no doubt I would have if given the chance.

I did live in Austin for five years and found it to be much worse than Berkeley because Berkeley is typical California… Austin it’s in the heart of Texas where people should know better.

ScottMcC on April 6, 2007 at 1:54 PM

I find this sort of thing very troubling. We allow our enemies into our government process. I think our president has been far to effective in the war against radical Muslims. People have forgotten 911. May G-d protect us.

Grayzel on April 6, 2007 at 2:00 PM

Hey, are you sure that Imam isn’t just Martin Landau doing his Bela Lugosi impression?

And is that Greg Knapp? On WBAP? Wasn’t Knapp on the Fox News Radio affiliate KLIF (although I heard they had a shakeup not too long ago and lost a bunch of people)?

ScottMcC on April 6, 2007 at 2:00 PM

As a Texan, I am very disappointed and upset. Austin has always been liberal, and unfortunately, there’s just not a whole lot we can do about it – mainly because it has such a huge student population. When I went to UT in the 80’s, we called the “The Daily Texan” the campus newspaper, “The Daily Toxin” because it was so radically left. The left, socialist point of view was (and still is) very pervasive on campus. I was somewhat immune to it because I was in the College of Business, so most of my profs were relatively conservative.

Anyway, typical Austin b.s., in my opinion.

pullingmyhairout on April 6, 2007 at 2:00 PM

Man, we’re planning on moving to Austin quite soon.

frankj on April 6, 2007 at 2:01 PM

Dan Patrick was chastized publically by me for failing to stay and questioning the inman and getting him in front of everyone to confirm his devotion to peace and love of family, instead as Dan is wont to do, he turned tail. This is another nail in the coffin of a once promising political career. Dan, who is a kind and good person had the chance to forcefully get this Wahhabist want a be to confess his views, instead he fled the scene.

Dan asked to be a leader, leading from the hallways outside the chamber isn’t going to get much accomplished.

EricPWJohnson on April 6, 2007 at 2:04 PM

Libs love Austin, its like an outpost of hell. We feel the same way about Philly.

Bad Candy on April 6, 2007 at 2:13 PM

This is VERY disturbing, even by Austin’s standards. I am a native Texan and have lived here all my life and have watched my beautiful state become more and more “liberalized” with every passing year, something I never thought possible for the “Bubba” capital of the nation. Political correctness is killing us, why can’t these liberal fools see that?

EricPWJohnson on April 6, 2007 at 2:04 PM

Although it would have been quite a show to see Dan Patrick question the imam, I think walking out made a statement in itself. I support Dan and thank God he is in Austin speaking for me and fellow Houstonians.

silenced majority on April 6, 2007 at 2:15 PM

Its happening in places like Colorado and PA too, Bryan. Liberals are fleeing their self imposed hellholes like NY&NJ and come here to PA, and think, know what we need here, tax hikes, spending and leftist social policy, just like NY&NJ! Cuz ruining two states wasn’t enough, they hafta go for three.

If you’re a lib from NY or NJ and you’re reading this, PA sucks, stay home.

Bad Candy on April 6, 2007 at 2:20 PM

I used to listen to Dan on morning talk radio when I lived in Houston. He’s also very good friends with Glenn Beck, if that is any indication as to his character. He is a fine man and I wish he represented me in south Texas. I’m proud of him for walking out. I think that made a big statement in and of itself.

pullingmyhairout on April 6, 2007 at 2:26 PM

I am a native Texan and have lived here all my life and have watched my beautiful state become more and more “liberalized” with every passing year

Blame the leftists from the East/West Coast that move to Austin every year in droves to work in that city’s high tech industry as engineers and designers.

However, a bit of the blame goes to the parents that do not encourage their children to study science/math/the arts because it teaches “evolution and atheism against God’s Creation” or in the case of the arts is not “a real job” which leaves those industries open to nothing but overpaid and out of touch libertines…

ScottMcC on April 6, 2007 at 2:27 PM

However, a bit of the blame goes to the parents that do not encourage their children to study science/math/the arts because it teaches “evolution and atheism against God’s Creation” or in the case of the arts is not “a real job” which leaves those industries open to nothing but overpaid and out of touch libertines…

ScottMcC on April 6, 2007 at 2:27 PM

Uhhh…yeah. I agree we have to do better in encouraging science & the arts, but to attribute our weakness in art&sci on just religion is asinine. You know, your own rabid prejudice makes it very very difficult to agree with you.

Bad Candy on April 6, 2007 at 2:33 PM

If you’re a lib from NY or NJ and you’re reading this, PA sucks, stay home.

Bad Candy on April 6, 2007 at 2:20 PM

Used to live in South Jersey, in Franklinville, off Rt.55. One of the few places not yet paved over. One thing in common with the democratic leadership (if you can it leadership) is their love for raising taxes. But you’re right, except for Valley Forge and the King of Prussia Mall. Happy Easter!

Kini on April 6, 2007 at 2:36 PM

Our Texas county was run by dem cronies for a long time, then they got swept out on GWB’s coattails. It was really great for a time. We went back to blue in ’06. And the local Republican Club is a handful of very nice but rather aged folk… Beloved spouse and I attended several of their meetings and they never even asked us to join.

RushBaby on April 6, 2007 at 2:36 PM

Leave the pot-smoking libertarians out of this one.

Dhimmi is as dhimmi does.

budorob on April 6, 2007 at 2:40 PM

Good for Sen. Dan Patrick.

CrimsonFisted on April 6, 2007 at 2:41 PM

Leave the pot-smoking libertarians out of this one.

Dhimmi is as dhimmi does.

budorob on April 6, 2007 at 2:40 PM

I’ll take a pothead libertarian over a socialist lib any day.

Bad Candy on April 6, 2007 at 2:46 PM

Elsewhere in Dar al LoneStar, JihadWatch reports a disturbing news item;

Women at Love Field ‘acting suspiciously’

Dallas police and federal terrorism officials are investigating two women, both dressed in camouflage pants under their traditional Muslim robes and scarves, who were seen conducting what appeared to be surveillance and acting suspiciously at Dallas Love Field.
—–
…Dallas officers stopped the car nearby, but the women refused to let police search their car, , according to a police report. The women had digital camera memory cards, binoculars, a flashlight and several lighters on them.

Police issued one of them a citation for having no front license plate and failing to change her address on a driver’s license. They were released.

We were watching the airplanes,” Ms. Al-Homsi said. “That’s not a crime, unless you’re Muslim.”

They forgot to shriek the magic word: Islamophobia!

Terp Mole on April 6, 2007 at 2:49 PM

As a UT alum, I got out of Austin as fast as I could. If they don’t succeed in indoctrinating liberals at UT, then they just import liberals from out of state to “keep Austin weird” (stupidest slogan ever, b/c having a bunch of pot-smoking burnouts, wannabe hippies, permanent students, and homeless people makes your city “cool”)

brak on April 6, 2007 at 2:50 PM

Austin = Texas for People Who Hate Texas

Lehuster on April 6, 2007 at 3:17 PM

Man, we’re planning on moving to Austin quite soon.
frankj on April 6, 2007 at 2:01 PM

Frank, I live in the conservative suburbs of Austin. We’re trying very hard to enclose the libs in an unbreakable ring of conservatism to keep them contained. We could use you and SarahK in the effort! ;-)

aero on April 6, 2007 at 3:17 PM

The last day I lived in Austin, I was driving through downtown when I saw a guy walking down Sixth Street naked, except for a big diaper. Just out of curiosity, I turned and followed him down the street but evidently I was the only one who found him peculiar, because nobody else in downtown Austin gave him a second glance.

Austin was also the first place I saw the name “Workers World Party,” the mysteriously funded Stalinists who sponsored the anti-war rallies on the UT Austin campus. That’s the same group which sponsored the giant anti-war rallies in Washington, DC. They get around.

Austin is where the Bush girls got busted for ordering a marguerita at Chevy’s. The restaurant manager, a rabid liberal partisan of the type common to Austin, called 911 on them. Austin hosts the UT Austin which enrolls 50,000 underage students, thousands of whom are ordering drinks on fake IDs at any hour in Austin. The police chief said that’s the first time anybody’s ever called the hotline to report underaged drinking in a restaurant. The manager met the police and told them she wanted the girls to get in big trouble. That’s the kind of cheap shots the lefties take: Attacking the children of their political opposition.

I saw the premiere of “Journeys With George” in Austin at the film festival there. That’s the video of Bush’s first presidential campaign, made by Alexandra Pelosi, daughter of Speaker of the House Pelosi. Every time Pelosi made a Bush joke, the crowd erupted in hoots and hollers. It was my first close up look at Bush Derangement Syndrome and the madness of crowds.

The first Saturday after the Sep 11 attacks on Tuesday, there was a protestor in front of the capitol in Austin dressed in a makeshift bedsheet dishdasha (Arab robes) wearing a keffiyeh. He was protesting any military response against the attackers of Sep 11, though we didn’t really know yet who had attacked us. Whoever they were, that protestor was pretty sure they had a good reason to attack America and that America would be wrong to defend itself.

Austin is where my Republican bumper sticker was carved up with a razor blade down by the Hike & Bike trail. It’s an inhospitable town to conservative free speech. The newspaper, the Austin Statesman, was originally the house organ of the Texas Democratic Party, literally.

That’s the kind of Austin I remember.

Tantor on April 6, 2007 at 3:21 PM

Bryan, don’t feel bad, Austin isn’t really in Texas….we disowned them a long time ago. :-)

Donna in West Texas

donna91 on April 6, 2007 at 3:23 PM

Its happening in places like Colorado and PA too, Bryan. Liberals are fleeing their self imposed hellholes like NY&NJ and come here to PA, and think, know what we need here, tax hikes, spending and leftist social policy, just like NY&NJ! Cuz ruining two states wasn’t enough, they hafta go for three.

Yep. These clowns ruin where ever they live with their liberal values ™. First, they discover that life were liberalism rules isn’t so good: Taxes and crime skyrocket. Then they move to a better place — and immediately proceed to ruin it by imposing their liberal values there.

It happened in my little corner of heaven, a “collar county” of Chicago. In 1980, the county was mostly rural, very low crime. Very low taxes. “Rush hour” in the nearby town (the county seat) was being the 6th car back at the stop sign of the intersection of two state highways.

Then, being disgusted by the worsening conditions in liberal-run Chicago and Cook (also spelled Crook) county, and wanting what we all want, “the good life,” these liberals move out to where the air is so clear that you can see the milky way at night and yet be within an hour and a half of Chicago.

So they come out here. Discover that a half of the adults in the county own “yucky guns,” hunt deer and pheasants, vote overwhelmingly conservative-Republican, actually celebrate Memorial Day as a community event, complete with a parade, are patriotic, and they say to themselves — WE CAN’T HAVE THIS.

And so, they procede to subvert the entire community to their way of thinking. Just like they are doing to Austin, Arizona (esp. Sedona), and New Mexico.

An example: Michelle, in her blog today, tells the story of a statute of a Navy Seal who received the Navy Cross posthumously that his home town wants to erect in a park — and how liberals are opposing it because it glorifies violence.

We had the same battle over a replica Civil War cannon. The town has a town square with a park. In the park, there is a Grand Army of the Republic civil war commemorative statue. There used to be a civil war-era mortar next to the statute and memorial, guarding it. Some time past, it had been removed. About 10 years ago, the city council decided to replace it with a replica, returning the memorial to its original state.

You should have seen the liberals go to war (so to speak) over that!

The local anti-war peaceniks based at the Unitarian Church in town went ballistic! It was glorifying violence, this bronze, material rememberance of the struggle over slavery. They protested, wrote letters to the editor of the local paper, attended the city council meetings. In short, they did their utmost to prevent the city from putting that replica back.

Wisely, the city council ignored these moron, and the square is now graced with a replica cannon guarding the GAR memorial and statue.

As they move here in ever increasing numbers, subdivisions grow where corn and soy used to. Trafic is so bad that rush hour is 2 and a half hours long. And that simple stop sign has been replaced by one of a series of unsynchronized traffic lights. Mandatory vehicle emissions inspections are being imposed, you can barely see the constellation due to the air and light pollution.

And they got a DEMOCRAT elected to Congress — the first EVER — in 2004.

Taxes are skyrocketing (liberals ALWAYS vote for more taxes). Gun owners are a distinct minority and the area’s hunt clubs are being shut down because of the yucky guns and yucky hunting.

PETA members have raided the local mink-farm more than once, freeing the animals (in the dead of winter so that most of them could freeze to death), as well as trying to buy up all the deer hunting permits to prevent hunters from taking the field. They’ve also illegally invaded the hunt clubs and attempted to interfere with legal, licenced hunting.

Their kids get educated in our schools, but with a cirriculum that is increasingly “liberal” because they also run (and get elected) to the local school boards. And instead of being careful stewards of the public’s funds, they’ve doubled the superintendent’s salary, increased teacher’s salaries at a rate that is more than double of that of inflation, and that doesn’t include the free health insurance and retirement packages for retirement at 50. And needless to say, the liberals running the schools haven’t seen a tax-rate hike that they didn’t want to impose on the rest of us. In the last 10 years, my property taxes have doubled, thanks to them.

The “good life” that they came out here for, is disappearing and being replaced by “section 8” housing, gangs (from Chicago), drugs in the schools, “bi-lingual” education that teaches an increasing population of illegal aliens in Spanish, rather than teaching them fluent English.

Did I mention that the crime rate is exploding?

I always wondered why the “mountain men” would up and move aas the population grew. Now I know.

georgej on April 6, 2007 at 3:24 PM

I live in the conservative suburbs of Austin. We’re trying very hard to enclose the libs in an unbreakable ring of conservatism to keep them contained.
aero on April 6, 2007 at 3:17 PM

Two of the spaciest, leftiest people I’ve ever known moved to a like-minded neighborhood in the country right outside Austin. Watch out for a pincher movement on your flanks!

eeyore on April 6, 2007 at 3:30 PM

Two of the spaciest, leftiest people I’ve ever known moved to a like-minded neighborhood in the country right outside Austin. Watch out for a pincher movement on your flanks!

eeyore on April 6, 2007 at 3:30 PM

LOL! Thanks for the heads-up. We’ll keep our eyes open. ;-) They can’t hide–you can spot their bumper stickers ten miles away. “No war for oil” and “Impeach Bush” stickers on a ’69 VW Bug kinda stick out amongst all the SUVs and minivans sporting “W” stickers and yellow ribbons.

aero on April 6, 2007 at 3:39 PM

georgej…that sucks ass.

Bad Candy on April 6, 2007 at 3:42 PM

I lived in Austin for about 100 years over a period of 18 months. It was my ex-wife’s idea, wouldn’t you know? The only difference between living there and living in the SF Bay area was that you could get decent Mexican food and barbecue there. A native son of Austin told me that the city is the “Freak Magnet” of Texas. Most of the souvenir shops sell t-shirts that read, “Keep Austin weird!” Trust me, people answer the call.

In reference to the diaper guy. Once, within sight of the capital building, I passed a topless woman wearing only skin-tight leather pants standing on the sidewalk. I think it was some kind of photo shoot, but it was hard to tell with all the leering homeless lechers in the way.

dostrick on April 6, 2007 at 3:52 PM

I could not believe my ears when I heard the news of the muslim prayer at the capitol. But alas it is Austin.

I live just south of Austin in a much more conservative area. We perfer to call it “The People’s Republic of Austin”. Austin used to be just different. Kind of weird but still Texas. That all changed when the libs from silicon valley turned Austin into silicon hills. It has been all downhill since. The good news is that except for parts of Houston, Dallas and the Rio Grande Valley, Austin is an island of libtardness.

brtex on April 6, 2007 at 3:56 PM

BTW, the guy in the diaper was probably Leslie. He is an icon of downtown Austin. Even ran for mayor one time. He can usually be seen on the famous 6th street wearing a leotard (usually pink) and high heals.

brtex on April 6, 2007 at 4:01 PM

Uhhh…yeah. I agree we have to do better in encouraging science & the arts, but to attribute our weakness in art&sci on just religion is asinine. You know, your own rabid prejudice makes it very very difficult to agree with you.
Bad Candy on April 6, 2007 at 2:33 PM

Uhhh…yeah. So if not an often reflexive backlash by a vocal minority of some close-minded Christians against those who pursue careers in scientific or arts-related fields that have done near-irreparable damage to those few Christians in the field such as me, Dr. Francis Collins, and HotAir’s Bryan Preston, how do you explain the huge “Republican gap” in those fields of interest?

Better yet, what can be done to reverse this trend and close the gap?

ScottMcC on April 6, 2007 at 4:06 PM

georgej

And so, they procede to subvert the entire community to their way of thinking. Just like they are doing to Austin, Arizona (esp. Sedona), and New Mexico.

It’s pretty much confined to Santa Fe for now,the Hollyweirdians don’t venture outside the city much.That could change now that the dhimmicrats won the last election.

Frantic Freddie on April 6, 2007 at 4:07 PM

Politicians have to be statesmen, walking out on tough situations is not, repeat not what a leader is supposed to do. He started to pass out articles about the comments the guy made was encouraged to speak, but like most talking heads, Dan fled

A new bumper sticker is already being sighted in Austin

See Dan Run

For someone who bragged for months how he was going to tear that town apart

he fled like a sissy boy at the sight of an inman in a time of war with our best facing uncertainty everyday.

Personally, he should resign.

EricPWJohnson on April 6, 2007 at 4:11 PM

I wish I remember where, but in some places, references to “Jesus Christ” have had to be removed from invocations in favor of more ecumenical appeals to a more general God[ish][ness]. I wonder if in those places the Fatiha will be similarly proscribed for its explicit rejections of Judiasm and Christiaity.

eeyore on April 6, 2007 at 4:18 PM

uh…Judaism and Christianity. PI[would be]MF.

eeyore on April 6, 2007 at 4:22 PM

Uhhh…yeah. So if not an often reflexive backlash by a vocal minority of some close-minded Christians against those who pursue careers in scientific or arts-related fields that have done near-irreparable damage to those few Christians in the field such as me, Dr. Francis Collins, and HotAir’s Bryan Preston, how do you explain the huge “Republican gap” in those fields of interest?

Better yet, what can be done to reverse this trend and close the gap?

ScottMcC on April 6, 2007 at 4:06 PM

Correlation does NOT equal causation.

It could be that leftists have control of higher ed, and indocrinate students for most of their time in the system, and high tech or high ed jobs require more time in the system, so there’s more indoctrination, more leftism. Could be simple anti-elitist/intellectualism as well, or that we focus on business and traditional 4yr schooling. I don’t know the answer. I’m sure religion can have some impact, but to attribute it solely to religion is a dangerous oversimplification at best, a malicious one at worst.

As to the solution. Got me dude…wish I knew. Let the public ed system destroy itself and rebuild is the best I’ve got, till then, encourage your child.

Bad Candy on April 6, 2007 at 4:27 PM

Could just be that no one wants to sit in a school system (basic or higher ed) and listen to and be subjected the real effects of rabid leftism for a career…I wouldn’t, which is why I decided not to go into education as a career.

Bad Candy on April 6, 2007 at 4:32 PM

And WHERE is this backlash against science? You’d think that Christians were tying scientists to lampposts and using them to light the night sky the way you talk.

Bad Candy on April 6, 2007 at 4:41 PM

Austin is where the Bush girls got busted for ordering a marguerita at Chevy’s Chuy’s.

Two days after the twins got busted, Jack, Roman, and I went to Chuy’s for lunch and all ordered margarita’s (even though I don’t drink). We were all over 21–in one case just barely over–but the waitress took the order and started to walk off.

“Whoa-whoa-whoa!” we said. “Don’t you wanna check our IDs?”

The waitress returned and we immediately began fumbling through our pockets and wallets. Each of us held up the cards in front of our faces and the waitress frowned…

-My ID card was a “buy 6 lunches get your 7th free” coupon from a competing restaurant with a crudely-glued photo of Neil Peart cut out from a Rush CD and the name “Dr. Harpo Thorndike” underneath in red ballpoint pen
-Roman’s ID card was obviously Jack’s license (Jack was half-Panamanian and looked nothing like Roman, who was at least 10 years younger than Jack)
-Jack’s ID card was my expired driver’s license from college that I had painted to look like I was wearing a clown nose and rainbow wig

The waitress shook her head and walked off.

We couldn’t understand why the manager didn’t immediately call 911.

ScottMcC on April 6, 2007 at 4:58 PM

My sister moved to Austin about 5 years ago for her job. I’ve been to visit her there a few times. It’s like a cross between California’s Silicon Valley and Berkeley, with a decent smattering of gay ol’ San Fran thrown in. It’s quite repulsive.

SilverStar830 on April 6, 2007 at 5:02 PM

It really is a damn shame about the liberalism here in Austin, because there are a lot of great things about this town otherwise. But they certainly screw it up.

Nevertheless, as aero mentioned, the burbs around here are a lot more conservative than the city proper, and my wife and I will probably be moving out there within the next year or so, my job in downtown notwithstanding.

thirteen28 on April 6, 2007 at 5:14 PM

Could be simple anti-elitist/intellectualism as well, or that we focus on business and traditional 4yr schooling.

Those simple minds railing against intellectualism need to grow a pair and enter the debate rather than complaining about how their voices are never heard in the Elite/Drive-By/Mainstream media…

Those businessmen need to use their business degrees to find the money to fund works of artists with traditional values…

…and are you denying that a quite a few of those who have chosen to make careers in the media arts and sciences have done so because it was a good way to rebel against what they wrongly viewed as an “oppressive religious” background?

ScottMcC on April 6, 2007 at 5:23 PM

I found it appalling that they knew nothing about this guy. Nothing.

I find it appalling that most of them STILL know nothing about this guy. Even worse.

And of course, the double standard applied that you can diss any religion whose members do not threaten to kill you, but by golly don’t you DARE disrespect the Religion of Peace(TM).

God I am ashamed of my senators today.

Oh well. They’ve embarrassed me before. So I gots the steel for it.

daveintexas on April 6, 2007 at 5:25 PM

Nevertheless, as aero mentioned, the burbs around here are a lot more conservative than the city proper, and my wife and I will probably be moving out there within the next year or so, my job in downtown notwithstanding.

thirteen28 on April 6, 2007 at 5:14 PM

We live in the suburbs primarily for the kids’ sake (and for the sake of our sanity). Plus, hubby and I both grew up in suburban-type communities, so it’s our comfort zone. Poor hubby just got a job downtown, though, so he’s got quite a commute. The new toll roads have helped tremendously with that. The kids and I rarely leave the burbs, so I’m not deeply affected by the liberal lunacy that is the city of Austin. Usually, I just read about it and shake my head, feeling thankful for the staunch conservatism of my community and representatives.

aero on April 6, 2007 at 5:49 PM

I find this sort of thing very troubling. We allow our enemies into our government process. I think our president has been far to effective in the war against radical Muslims. People have forgotten 911. May G-d protect us. -Grayzel on April 6, 2007 at 2:00 PM

It is becoming more and more apparent that it is not simply a matter of ‘allowing’ – so much as the inexcusable ‘inviting’ of our enemies into the government process.

See here

To quote a comment placed to this report –

Exactly WHY are the DOJ, schools, courts, law enforcements, government, the press, etc. promoting and protecting Islam?

heroyalwhyness on April 6, 2007 at 5:52 PM

We live in the suburbs primarily for the kids’ sake (and for the sake of our sanity). Plus, hubby and I both grew up in suburban-type communities, so it’s our comfort zone. Poor hubby just got a job downtown, though, so he’s got quite a commute. The new toll roads have helped tremendously with that. The kids and I rarely leave the burbs, so I’m not deeply affected by the liberal lunacy that is the city of Austin. Usually, I just read about it and shake my head, feeling thankful for the staunch conservatism of my community and representatives.

aero on April 6, 2007 at 5:49 PM

I actually lived in Cedar Park when I first moved to this area from North Carolina, and noticed that it wasn’t nearly as liberal (and was much more hospitable) than Austin proper. I moved closer in when I started working downtown, but with the new toll roads going in, as well as the Cap Metro express lines and the fact that I can work at home on some days, I think it’s getting to be time for me to move back out there.

thirteen28 on April 6, 2007 at 6:03 PM

I am waiting on job offers (should get them within the next week) from Austin and a small town a few hours west of Houston. I need the job quick so it is pretty much who ever calls first…but god, I hope it isnt Austin.

On a side note, the weirdest thing I have seen in Austin? A midget without a shirt (I hope he was wearing pants…) sitting in a shopping cart watching traffic. I stopped to fill up and not two minutes later I look over and he was gone. I could see for a pretty good distance too. How the hell did he do that?

SnakeintheGrass on April 6, 2007 at 6:19 PM

…and are you denying that a quite a few of those who have chosen to make careers in the media arts and sciences have done so because it was a good way to rebel against what they wrongly viewed as an “oppressive religious” background?

ScottMcC on April 6, 2007 at 5:23 PM

No, I’m not, but you can’t assume that its simple as rebellion against religion, even when they themselves said it. Correlation =/= causation. Who’s to say they wouldn’t rebel against something else like traditional society, free market, business, conservative culture? How many staunch conservatives started as rabid libs, are they rebelling against atheism/secularism?

Bad Candy on April 6, 2007 at 6:24 PM

Blame the leftists from the East/West Coast that move to Austin every year in droves to work in that city’s high tech industry as engineers and designers.

I certainly blame them for the lousy traffic. But I’ve been here since ’79, and I can assure you, this town has always been an outpost of the radical left.

Blacklake on April 6, 2007 at 6:37 PM

The discouragement and/or outright rejection of traditional Judeo-Christian beliefs as reflected in the past 50 years of key culture influencers–philosophers, politicians, and mass media artists–in Western Europe, Japan, and the USA obviously had nothing to do with the rapid decline in moral standards.

It’s the myth of causation!

When 99% of the movies, music, newspapers, and books consumed in the West were produced by avowed leftists and Western Society took a hard left turn at the same time… well, that was all a big correlation.

This has been a civilized enough battle of wits, but it’s a battle predicated on a notion that hardline Christian conservative parents encourage their children to be fun-loving artisans and radical scientists just as much as any other demographic. Ridiculous!

Besides, there are more important battles to fight in this long war.

ScottMcC on April 6, 2007 at 7:38 PM

I grew up in Austin. Moved back to Austin after living in different areas like Dallas and Houston.
I hated them both. I missed the beauty of the Hill Country.
Yes, the libs are loud and yes they are terribly obnoxious!
I have confronted moonbats spouting the usual drivel at the neighborhood grocery store, looking them in the eye on more than one occasion and simply stated:
“Oh, I forgot, we DO live in the moonbat capitol of Texas”.
Watching the jaws drop is absolutely hysterical!
Funny thing is, after they walk off in a rage, muttering under their breath, inevitably, someone in line behind me makes it a point to say “Thanks for shutting them up”.
There are a larger number of conservatives in the Austin area than the press and of course the liberal / Keep Austin Wierd crowd would have you believe.
Some of the conservatives need to stick around, if for nothing else, to continue giving the raving lunatics a hard time!

MITX on April 6, 2007 at 7:53 PM

This has been a civilized enough battle of wits, but it’s a battle predicated on a notion that hardline Christian conservative parents encourage their children to be fun-loving artisans and radical scientists just as much as any other demographic. Ridiculous!

I still think its an oversimplification, yes there’s a grain of truth that religious types don’t encourage artisanship and advanced science well, but there’s more to it than that, and I think its dangerous to pretend that its just those darn wacky Christians that are causing it, there are so many factors to consider, liberalism itself is a strong deterrent, I know it was for me in education, plus I think there is enough abuse on these people from the left, we don’t need to destroy our own too.

Bad Candy on April 6, 2007 at 8:08 PM

The best things about Austin is The Oasis restaurant, perched on a cliff overlooking Lake Travis:
http://www.oasis-austin.com/
It’s something of an Austin tradition to go there to watch the sun set on the lake.

It’s also good to go out to Mount Bonnell for the view in the morning. Take a camera and snap a shot of your favorite cutie there with the river below as a backdrop.

Austin does its own imitation of Mardi Gras, where dozens of women are eager to show you what they’ve got right there on Sixth Street, the party street. Worth a long look.

And it’s only a 90 minute drive to Fredericksburg where one of the best military history museums in America resides: The Museum of the Pacific War
http://www.nimitz-museum.org/george_bush_gallery.htm
It’s better than the Smithsonian.
Be sure to see the living history demo of small arms.

Tantor on April 6, 2007 at 8:09 PM

Just make sure you move to Williamson County (Round Rock, Cedar Park.) It’s all Red here.

BTW, the editor of the Daily Toxin when I was at UT….

The Forehead! Paul Begala.

digitalintrigue on April 6, 2007 at 8:10 PM

Sean Hanity will be covering this very story in depth on Monday on his Radio Show. A caller called this in today on his show. He’s probably a reader of either LGF or HotAir.

Egfrow on April 6, 2007 at 9:03 PM

I lived in Houston when Dan Patrick was running–I had the distinct honor of voting for him in the primary (we moved to Austin-land soon after). But he’s the only person I’ve ever voted for with absolutely zero misgivings.

Now we’re doing our part to keep Austin a little _less_ weird. The loonies can leave. I’m staying here.

Hack Ptui on April 6, 2007 at 9:04 PM

Florence Shapiro, the Plano senator who set up the prayer, has to go. It was attributed to Lenin the phrase, “useful idiot” More accurately Lenin used the term “deaf mutes”. Lenin’s writing regarding the “deaf mutes” are no doubt being used by CAIR and other political jihad front groups in the Western world:

The so-called cultural element of Western Europe and America are incapable of comprehending the present state of affairs and the actual balance of forces; these elements must be regarded as deaf-mutes and treated accordingly….
A revolution never develops along a direct line, by continuous expansion, but forms a chain of outbursts and withdrawals, attacks and lulls, during which the revolutionary forces gain strength in preparation for their final victory…

We must: (a) In order to placate the deaf-mutes, proclaim the fictional separation of our government … from the Comintern, declaring this agency to be an independent political group. The deaf-mutes will believe it. (b) Express a desire for the immediate resumption of diplomatic relations with capitalist countries on the basis of complete non-interference in their internal affairs. Again, the deaf- mutes will believe it. They will even be delighted and fling wide-open their doors through which the emissaries of the Comintern and Party Intelligence agencies will quickly infiltrate into these countries disguised as our diplomatic, cultural, and trade representatives.

Capitalists the world over and their governments will, in their desire to win Soviet market, shut their eyes to the above-mentioned activities and thus be turned into blind deaf-mutes. They will furnish credits, which will serve as a means of supporting the Communist parties in their countries, and, by supplying us, will rebuild our war industry, which is essential for our future attacks on our suppliers. In other words, they will be laboring to prepare their own suicide.

Texas Mike on April 6, 2007 at 9:37 PM

Wow. You can blame all this on Austin and everything, but what about the rest of the Texas Senate? They must have been around during the establishment of “Texas Muslim Legislative Day,” of which this lovely invocation marks the third installment(according to Dave in Texas). Somewhere Sam Houston is rolling in his grave. Did Davy C. die at the Alamo for this?

ThanksMo on April 6, 2007 at 9:40 PM

Hey people, I live in Austin and although I am surrounded by liberals, I like it here. It’s a beautiful and fun city to live in. Anyway, most of the lefty people I know are nice, even if they are liberal. There are also a lot of Christians and conservatives here in Austin. Some of us have to be here to lead by example. God loves everyone, even those who hate and deny him!

And as a response to the guy who says that Christians don’t go into the Arts, I want him to know that there is a large Arts movement among the Christian community here in Austin. Hope Chapel, Riverbend Church and other churches have ministries dedicated especially to artists. They also hold very popular and respected arts festivals, amazing performances in drama, dance and music and have regular art exhibits. The arts pastor at Hope Chapel is David Taylor. Here is his blog. He is an extremely articulate and intelligent artist himself. The latest entry (Sat. March 31, 2007) is actually about the chocolate Jesus…you will be surprised at his response to it!

rising21 on April 6, 2007 at 9:45 PM

there is a large Arts movement among the Christian community here in Austin. Hope Chapel, Riverbend Church and other churches have ministries dedicated especially to artists…. The arts pastor at Hope Chapel is David Taylor. Here is his blog.

Thank you, rising21, for the link to Taylor’s blog! Definitely food for thought there. I agree with him. And I love to hear about Christians who are out vigorously engaging the culture in ways that are not thought “typical” of Christians. (We have an excellent role model for such behavior in Jesus.)

Also, good point about living with lefties: I live in the San Francisco Bay area and all the lefties I know here (that is, everyone I know here) are earnest and well-meaning to a fault, very dear people. It’s beautiful here, I love it… and yet every single stereotype about the place is true, sometimes humorously so, sometimes infuriatingly so. When you live and breathe with people you love–and yet many of whose cherished principles would lead to the slow demise of America as you know it–every day is a lesson in discernment and tact: just what can I let slide? and where do I absolutely draw a line? For me: living around practicing Muslims = no problem. Having a guy with Wahhabist connections give the prayer for a U.S. state’s legislature for gooey multicultural reasons, while U.S. troops are being blown up in Iraq = big problem.

ThanksMo on April 6, 2007 at 10:25 PM

I lived in Austin for most of the 80’s. I loved it there. I’m sure we both have changed a great deal since then. It was about the music for me. There was a locally based band, “Extreme Heat”- best darn funky party band I ever saw. Back then, Austin was the place to be, but it still had a smaller feel to it then. The street musicians actually had places to live. The political divide was less acute back then. You could still walk around sixth street with an open beer before a-holes ruined it for everyone.

Buck Turgidson on April 6, 2007 at 10:33 PM

Well lets not turn on this conservative for not carrying the libs PC water.

He did the right thing and should be applauded for it. There is no reason for him to sit through a propoganda prayer just because his colleagues were lapping it up like a dog eating barf off the floor of a roadside $hit house!

Screw these Islamo-fascists, their PC apologists, and the camels they road in on!

csdeven on April 6, 2007 at 10:57 PM

Dan Patrick’s walking out said it all. No point in confronting the JollyJihad iman.
I try not to go to Austin unless I have to and I only live 45 miles away. The best part of Austin is long gone. The quaintness of a small (but large) college town, the Armadillo World Hearquarters, and few even know of the Broken Spoke or Threadgills.
Is it the water in Austin that creates such liberalism? Or perhaps all the bat guava (remember, Austin is the [moon]bat capital of the world)?
I love how the blue staters move here because they can’t make a living where they came from or can’t afford to live there anymore but want to tell us Texans how to run our state and why we should be more open to higher taxes, more giveaway programs and subsidize every lazy person that ever walked. If they don’t like it, they should keep their butts where they were.
If you are conservative, just cross over into Williamson or Hays counties and you will be fine.

retire05 on April 7, 2007 at 1:08 AM

As a UT alum, I got out of Austin as fast as I could. If they don’t succeed in indoctrinating liberals at UT, then they just import liberals from out of state to “keep Austin weird” (stupidest slogan ever, b/c having a bunch of pot-smoking burnouts, wannabe hippies, permanent students, and homeless people makes your city “cool”)

brak on April 6, 2007 at 2:50 PM

I know. I always see liberals wearing “Keep Austin Weird” tshirts as if they want a gold star for being “alternative.” I always think “loser” when I see someone wearing that tshirt.

Man, we’re planning on moving to Austin quite soon.

frankj on April 6, 2007 at 2:01 PM

The suburbs are far nicer, more scenic with hills and canyons, and very conservative. My sister and her family lived in Cedar Park for a few years until about six months ago.

januarius on April 7, 2007 at 7:59 AM

The best things about Austin is The Oasis restaurant, perched on a cliff overlooking Lake Travis:

they must have rebuilt. I thought the place burned to the ground.

My favorite thing about Austin: going to morning classes and then hitting the lake for an afternoon of water skiing. heaven on earth.

Oh, and I was there in the days of the Broken Spoke and Threadgills. What about Jaime’s Mexican Restaurant? They had the best dip compueso around…and pitchers, pitchers of awesome margaritas…

pullingmyhairout on April 7, 2007 at 9:26 AM

oops. i didn’t close my quotes. sorry.

pullingmyhairout on April 7, 2007 at 9:26 AM

One more south Austin conservative, and used to attend Hope Chapel–now at Hope in the City. If you want more examples of Christians promoting and participating in the arts, check out burning brush, associated with the cornerstone festival and jpusa.

TexasDan on April 7, 2007 at 12:20 PM

And the winner is:

rabid prejudice makes it very very difficult to agree with you. “

Bad Candy on April 6, 2007 at 2:33 PM

Ah, yes, the Christian “rabid prejudice” meme.

Because, well, you know, we Christians are constantly making videos of our beheadings, constantly excercising prejudices of unknown variety and type, yadda yadda yadda.

These rabidly prejudiced Christians seem to be as hard to find in the real world as the elusive moderate muslim.

Still, we continue to turn the other cheek, be advised that patience is wearing thin on that.

Thank you for not becoming a teacher, you truly are bad candy, not suitable for consumption.

.

The Machine on April 7, 2007 at 1:27 PM

Is everyone here from Texas? Reading all these posts makes me feel like I’m in Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure.

Help me out…

The stars at night, are big and bright…

budorob on April 7, 2007 at 3:30 PM

“rabid prejudice makes it very very difficult to agree with you. “

Bad Candy on April 6, 2007 at 2:33 PM

Ah, yes, the Christian “rabid prejudice” meme. The Machine on April 7, 2007 at 1:27 PM

If you read what I responded to, you’d see I was DEFENDING Christians against prejudice, learn to read numbskull.

You fail at life.

Bad Candy on April 7, 2007 at 4:02 PM

If we ever get around to labeling islam for what it is, death cult, we just may drop the insanity. Any other cult named something else that does what they do…would be better contained imo.

Highrise on April 7, 2007 at 4:11 PM

George j:
I lived in southern cook/eastern will county from 1973-2006.
Will county was ALWAYS very Red-until recently.

My old home town was in 2 counties, half in Cook/half in Will.
In 2004 the Will county side went overwhelmingly democratic.
It seems that dems swept all the major county offices in 2006.
*spit*

annoyinglittletwerp on April 7, 2007 at 9:31 PM

Deep in the heart of Texas!

MITX on April 7, 2007 at 11:29 PM

…and are you denying that a quite a few of those who have chosen to make careers in the media arts and sciences have done so because it was a good way to rebel against what they wrongly viewed as an “oppressive religious” background?

ScottMcC on April 6, 2007 at 5:23 PM

Man, if that isn’t an unadulterated biased pile of b.s!!! I’ve been a Christian my entire life and found nothing to deter me from my chosen profession as an engineer/scientist. Religion opposed to science is mostly a lie propagated by those that would demean religion.

An imam giving the opening prayer for the Texas senate is extremely bad karma. What were they thinking?

docdave on April 8, 2007 at 7:00 PM

Interesting topic. We’re considering a move to the ‘burbs of Austin in the next year or so for a change of scenery. We helped keep Sarasota red last fall when Vern Buchanon squeaked by Christine Jennings (and she’s still whining about it). Maybe we can help be another conservative voice in the Austin moonbatty universe.

The Oasis looks like our kinda place. Thanks for the link Tantor.

Im_no_dhimmi on April 8, 2007 at 10:08 PM

I wonder what Kinky Friedman would say? “Thank you very much?”

From the above post, don’t think your states are not the only ones inflected with the NJ/NY/Conn uber-lib disease. Like the plague, they are relocating to North Carolina in droves. At first, we all thought it was funny, because the first group of them called themselves “tax refugees.” Now those same “tax refugees” want to raise taxes and stuff because they want the same level of “service” they received up North. And no-win for all.

FYI, Chapel Hill, NC = Moonbat Capital of the South

Wuptdo on April 9, 2007 at 9:42 AM

Man, if that isn’t an unadulterated biased pile of b.s!!! I’ve been a Christian my entire life and found nothing to deter me from my chosen profession as an engineer/scientist. Religion opposed to science is mostly a lie propagated by those that would demean religion.

While I’m glad you personally stuck to your guns, I’d like to know exactly why I’m painted the biased bullshitter here?

-Do you deny that the lie is constantly propagated?
-Am I the biased bullshitter for bringing up the fact of this lie’s propagation in our culture?
-Are not the majority scientists and popular artists in North America and Europe that help to propagate this lie on a daily basis either atheists or anti-Christian?
-Could political conservative Christians do a whole lot more to encourage their children to strengthen their knowledge of the arts and sciences rather than pushing them into other–seemingly stereotypical–career paths?

Believe me, as the evangelical Christian nut ensconsed in the deepest blue part of the Left Coast (a fact that EVERY knee jerk attacker on this and other forums I’ve participated in always overlooks no matter how often I bring it up), I’m overjoyed that “nothing” deterred you and you can look all of us in the eye and truthfully say that 100% of your professors or peers in your time in school and in your professional career never scoffed at your beliefs and told you that there is no God.

I graduated from film school, dude. I heard that “your imaginary friend in the sky” crap every frickin’ day from profs and peers and I held firm.

You guys need to understand that I am pointing out the fact that Christians/political conservatives are losing ground in terms of mindshare in our society. We are not celebrated scientists. We are not famous artists. We used to be and now we’re being portrayed by the celebrated and the famous as a cult of backward violent lunatics.

Other than Johnny Walker Lindh, what kid in the USA wants to be a part of a backward violent cult of lunatics?

We must change that perception by embracing the arts and sciences as our professions of choice. We must lead by example and create the change from within. Christians have been very good at doing this for over 2,000 years and there is no better time than now to engage in more of that change.

I AM NOT OUR PROBLEM, but ignoring the problem is our problem.

ScottMcC on April 9, 2007 at 12:46 PM

And as a response to the guy who says that Christians don’t go into the Arts, I want him to know that there is a large Arts movement among the Christian community here in Austin. Hope Chapel, Riverbend Church and other churches have ministries dedicated especially to artists.

I know what you’re saying because I attended Riverbend when Dr. Mann was there. Dr. Smith married my wife and I six years ago. I love Riverbend and all the work that Carlton Dillard and his music ministry has done.

However, you must realize that in current Western society these shining examples are (unfortunately) the exception rather than the rule.

ScottMcC on April 9, 2007 at 12:51 PM

As a Texan, you have no idea how painful this post is for me to write.

Please.

Kralizec on April 9, 2007 at 12:59 PM

Is everyone here from Texas?

budorob on April 7, 2007 at 3:30 PM

There’s someplace else?

Rusty Bill on April 10, 2007 at 12:46 AM

There is a thriving Christian arts community in Austin. Churches like Hope Chapel, First Evangelical Free Church, Crestview Baptist, just to name a few, have art galleries at the church sites. The exhibits are usually there from 30 to 90 days. They may include paintings, photography, sculptures etc. It could be local artists or artists from other states or countries. Most of these churches have person/s who oversee the visual arts at that church. The community has also begin to meet for symposiums and workshops. Sorry to get off subject but someone did ask.

Bic on April 10, 2007 at 1:40 PM