They’re gloating about it, too. Evan Coyne Maloney, call your office.

A number of students who rushed the stage during Minuteman Project founder Jim Gilchrist’s Oct. 4 speech at Columbia received letters yesterday informing them that they would be punished with “disciplinary warnings” for their conduct at the event.

Three students-one of whom received the verdict more than a month ago-confirmed yesterday that they were charged with simple violations of the University’s Rules of Conduct. The resulting warnings, which will be notated on students’ transcripts and remain there until the end of 2008, are the lowest of four possible outcomes for those found to be in violation of the rules. Disciplinary warnings place no financial or academic constraints on the person charged and state “that future violations will be treated more seriously.”

“It’s a light punishment, it’s a slap on the wrist,” Monique Dols, GS, who was given a disciplinary warning, said. “It’s a victory for free speech and anti-racism.”…

[One] student, Andrew Tillet-Saks, CC ’09 was also found to have engaged “in conduct that places another in danger of bodily harm.”…

“I’m glad they [the Minutemen] are outraged. They get press from whining, but an impression of strength is more important in the long run for a vigilante group which thrives on intimidating immigrants, and this verdict, like the protest, helps subvert that,” Judd said.

The irony is fragrant. Stinnnngs the nostrils.

Thanks to Weasel Zippers for the tip. Below you’ll find the video that started it all. Make sure you watch this clip, too, if you haven’t seen it before, to see what Dols means by “anti-racism.”

Update: Thanks to Alex K. for catching this. Still not exactly a stiff sentence, but it’s a step in the right direction.

The University has censured at least three students for their disruption of an Oct. 4, 2006 protest by Minuteman Project founder Jim Gilchrist, one of the implicated students confirmed Tuesday. The disclosure, which came one day after it was revealed that three students had received lesser disciplinary warnings, signifies the harshest known punishment for any of the protest participants to date…

According to the Rules of University Conduct, censure is a step up in severity from a disciplinary warning. If a censured student is found in violation of the rules a second time, he or she is automatically suspended from the University for at least a semester or, if the violation is serious, is expelled…

In addition to an automatic suspension or expulsion for any future offenses, a censure remains on a student’s record until the student completes a degree or certificate.