Jihadis liberate Ramadi soccer field by blowing Iraqi teens to pieces — or do they?

posted at 1:36 pm on February 27, 2007 by Allahpundit

The battle for Ramadi is a month away and they’re car-bombing the children of the people they’re counting on for support? Doesn’t seem too bright. Which helps explain why it might not have happened:

The U.S. military said it was unaware of a bomb attack in the city of Ramadi on Tuesday in which Iraqi officials and a tribal leader said 18 people, mostly children, had been killed.

Iraqiya state TV said all those killed near a soccer field were children while local tribal leader Hamid Farhan al-Hays told the station 12 were children and six were women. Police said 19 people, mostly children, were killed or wounded.

A U.S. military spokesman, Major Jeff Pool, said a controlled blast by U.S. soldiers near a soccer field in Ramadi slightly wounded 30 people, including nine children. He said the wounded had cuts and bruises.

“I can’t imagine there would be another attack involving children without our people knowing,” said Pool.

Hays blamed the blast on Sunni Arab-led al Qaeda, which is involved in an escalating power struggle with Sunni elders for control of Anbar province, heart of the Sunni insurgency in Iraq. Ramadi is the capital of Anbar.

The soccer field’s near an American base, so if the jihadis did do it, they’re either sending a message about not fraternizing with the occupier or it’s a simple revenge spasm aimed at a population they’re increasingly at war with.

Seems awfully specific to be a hoax:

The blast occurred in central Ramadi, a hotbed of the Sunni insurgency. The victims were aged 10 to 15, police said.

The bomb-rigged car blew apart at about 4:15 p.m. local time while the boys were playing…

It was not immediately known if the children were the intended targets, but young people are often caught in Iraq’s daily bloodshed.

Meanwhile, Egypt’s finally dropping the filthy Iraqi insurgent propaganda channel, al-Zawraa, from its satellite carrier. They insist it wasn’t political, but the U.S. has been leaning on them for months:

The chairman of the board of NileSat, the country’s government-owned satellite, said the Al-Zawraa feed was cut for technical reasons and not as an act of censorship. The channel’s owner said the move as politically motivated and said he would sue Egypt…

“The Americans are very angry with the station because it shows the real image of resistance, not so-called terrorism, and increasing resistance against the occupation,” [Mishan] Al-Jabouri said in a phone call from Damascus, Syria, where he lives in exile. “It seems as if the Egyptians are punishing us for that.”

Al-Jabouri said his channel is still being transmitted by another satellite, Arabsat.

Al-Jabouri himself publicly turned against Al Qaeda last week, but he’s still broadcasting on behalf of the rest of the jihad. Why had the Egyptians left him on the air for so long? Possibly because the military asked them to:

While the Iraqi soldiers and interpreters want al-Zawraa shut down, members of the U.S. intelligence community disagree. According to a military intelligence officer serving in Iraq, U.S. intelligence doesn’t want to shut al-Zawraa down as it provides intelligence on the insurgents activities. When I asked senior American military and intelligence sources about shutting down pro-jihadi websites in the past, they expressed the same sentiment.

With major operations in Anbar starting soon, maybe they figured the cost of letting Zawraa incite the locals finally outweighed the intel benefits.

Back in Baghdad, Gen. Odierno says sectarian killings are way down since the start of the surge. That’s due to two factors, probably: Sadr’s order to the Mahdi Army to lie low (temporarily) and, if you believe the unconfirmed reports Iraqslogger‘s getting, the possibility that the long knives are out and he’s having his own people whacked.

Sources in the capital say that Mahdi Army members have been disappearing or turning up dead in the Sadr City, Kadhimiya, and Baladiyat areas of the capital…

These are said to be inside jobs.

According to the word on the street, a “special team” has been dispatched from Najaf to dispose of Mahdi Army members who have been criminal or disloyal, or who have “disgraced” the Mahdi Army.

Exit question/quotation, sure to be the most pathetic of the day: “Can Congress continue to fault U.S. policy from a distance, or must lawmakers take hold of it and risk owning the outcome?”


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Mm-hm. Inside jobs. “Special team“.

Sadr’s a pimp. He never could have out-fought–well, anyone. But I didn’t know until this day it was Odierno all along.

see-dubya on February 27, 2007 at 1:44 PM

Heh.

Allahpundit on February 27, 2007 at 1:47 PM

Over/under on total comments for this thread (not counting this one): 13.

Allahpundit on February 27, 2007 at 1:49 PM

Change the headline to include a Godfather reference: “Today the Sadr family settles its accounts” or some such.

Or maybe a pic of Pamela Anderson and her boots. Who knew she had feet?

see-dubya on February 27, 2007 at 1:54 PM

Over/under on total comments for this thread (not counting this one): 13.

Give me $100 on the over. And deleting my spam commenting 10+ more times isn’t allowed.

Hoodlumman on February 27, 2007 at 1:56 PM

Over/under on total comments for this thread (not counting this one): 13.

Allahpundit on February 27, 2007 at 1:49 PM

Over: $20

Or do bets not count as comments?

spmat on February 27, 2007 at 1:56 PM

Exit question/quotation, sure to be the most pathetic of the day: “Can Congress continue to fault U.S. policy from a distance, or must lawmakers take hold of it and risk owning the outcome?”

This one is easy. It depends on the outcome. If it’s good, they’ll own it and say they’ve always owned it. If it’s bad then it’s not theirs. For a quick reference, please see Democrats that voted for the AUMF.

Hoodlumman on February 27, 2007 at 2:05 PM

It should be fairly reasonable for someone from the CPT or MNF-I to head over to the location and see whether there was any kind of incident at the location claimed.

You know, there’d be some kind of forensic evidence. Charred materials, shrapnel, bloodstains, etc.

Fire station reports. Police station reports. Etc.

Is this a hoaxed situation or did something happen. Beats me, but if it was a hoax, it doesn’t matter how specific the claims were – Jamil Hussein claimed that bodies were immolated and mosques destroyed – and that didn’t pan out either.

The claims for the deadly incident are attributed to Iraqi officials and tribal leaders – specifically Hamid Farhan al-Hays. Can we get Hays to confirm this that he witnessed the events first hand? Or did he hear this from others?

lawhawk on February 27, 2007 at 2:13 PM

Can we get the AP out there to get to the bottom of this? Or can we just decide if it’s helpful as propaganda and run with that?

Pablo on February 27, 2007 at 2:29 PM

Seems like the blast was the controlled one by us, and some local shia are just using it to go after sunni.

forged rite on February 27, 2007 at 2:44 PM

I pray the version citing a US Army spokesman telling of a controlled demolition which injured the children is the accurate one and at present it is the one I tend to believe.

LakeRuins on February 27, 2007 at 3:01 PM

Now, there’s AP saying that there is confusion about the two stories – whether they’re describing one event or two separate ones, not to mention whether there were any casualties.

lawhawk on February 27, 2007 at 3:28 PM

My daughter is back in Germany!

She is back from a 6 month tour in Ramadi. She regularly reported the odd machine gun fire or helter-skelter mortar blast in the distance, but no serious attacks or threats from sunni-al-quada-what-ever save for one suicide coward explosion in a market full of women & old men last year.

The monotany of ‘hurry up and wait’ was broken by the munitions guys detonating captured ordinance – like those reported by the army relating to this story.

But this recent report smacks of ‘dubious information’ like a dirty hippie stinks of weed.

The local T.V. station is reporting women & children were killed; the police say 19 children killed or wounded and the U.S. Army says ‘what the heck are you talking about’?

My propoganda filter is set to strong.

locomotivebreath1901 on February 27, 2007 at 3:40 PM

Good to hear, loco.

“Can Congress continue to fault U.S. policy from a distance, or must lawmakers take hold of it and risk owning the outcome?”

Lawmakers don’t make foreign policy. Executives do that. As far as owning any particular outcome, it’s doubtful any negative outcome would be attributed to the Congress in its current form. The buck stops where it will be most profitable to the leftists assigning its position.

spmat on February 27, 2007 at 3:58 PM

God bless Loco’s daughter.

The story is probably true. Mohamed’s brave warriors vs. a kiddie soccer team … sounds like an almost fair fight.

Tony737 on February 27, 2007 at 4:43 PM

Or maybe a pic of Pamela Anderson and her boots. Who knew she had feet?

see-dubya on February 27, 2007 at 1:54 PM

She certainly didn’t; or at least she’s forgotten about them since her first silicone injection.

urbancenturion on February 27, 2007 at 7:44 PM

Would anyone really be shocked that a Muslim killed another Muslim? Heck, would anyone really be shocked if you heard a Muslim killed anyone?

Tim Burton on February 27, 2007 at 10:05 PM

Congratulations loco….now take a deep breath and give thanks.I am very happy to hear.
Muslim very baaad.What number on the thread is this guys?…heh

spazzmomma on February 27, 2007 at 10:14 PM