Welcoming heroes home

posted at 9:10 am on February 16, 2007 by Bryan

Must-see video from ABC News, of all places. This story makes me proud to be a Texan. Watch it with a hanky close by.

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YES!!!!!!!!!! Great Americans in Texas!

Wade on February 16, 2007 at 9:23 AM

This.
Man.
Is.
American.

DFW Thanksgiving 05. My son was returning to Iraq on Thanksgiving morning departing from DFW. This group put on a feast for the fellas. The lobby was packed with Soldiers, Marines, & Airmen. Every single one of them received not just a meal but a hearty thank you. It was something special to see. My wife helped serve and I did my best to carry in boxes of gifts (books, cd players, munchies, whatever had been donated by the community) and we passed them out with the USO.

The local NBC station had a film crew there. The reporter, probably a nice man, tried his damnest to get family members on the camera lamenting the fact that this day of all days must be very very sad. He didn’t get it. All the interviews were ‘we are proud, we are thankful, we wish them ALL God’s speed’. I have that on tape and when I want a good cry I watch it.

Limerick on February 16, 2007 at 9:24 AM

I lived in Bangor, Maine during the first Gulf War. The airport was loaded with well wishers each time a plane landed with military folks returning home. Maine has become a liberal test tube due to out of state money pouring in to support pathetic politicians, but there are always good people with their heads on straight in the mix.

God bless our military men and women.

Hening on February 16, 2007 at 9:24 AM

What a great way to start my morning. Thank you so much for that much needed video. That’s what being an American is all about.

robblefarian on February 16, 2007 at 9:24 AM

Bravo! I wish I had those folks when I came back, but my family filled that role just fine!

Glad to see there are still decent folks like that who appreciate the sacrafice these fine men and women give for us.

rightside on February 16, 2007 at 9:29 AM

The Dixie Chix could not be reached for comment

Wade on February 16, 2007 at 9:30 AM

Thank-you Bryan.

infidel on February 16, 2007 at 9:41 AM

He does more for the country everyday, than congress does every year.

right2bright on February 16, 2007 at 9:42 AM

He is why I serve my country.

Sven on February 16, 2007 at 9:42 AM

I saw this several days ago. I cried.

amerpundit on February 16, 2007 at 9:51 AM

God bless them all for doing that. They are providing comfort and support to our heroes.

Benaiah on February 16, 2007 at 9:58 AM

I just moved into an apartment minutes from that airport. It never before occurred to me to do that. I should check that out.

Esthier on February 16, 2007 at 9:59 AM

I got up this morning ticked off at this ‘teens’ weather but now the sun is shining and I feel warm all over…all due to this video…Thank God there are still decent people left !

DoctorDentons on February 16, 2007 at 10:02 AM

Bangor Maine, Gulf War. My mother was a member of a Woman’s association that helped to meet EVERY PLANE of soldiers coming into and through the airport with sandwiches and hot coffee (they’re big on making sandwiches in Maine). She said it was one of the most rewarding things she had ever done.

Babs on February 16, 2007 at 10:03 AM

Esthier:

It is in terminal C. USO sets up there.

Limerick on February 16, 2007 at 10:04 AM

This is related so I hope I don’t get called for spamming:

http://gatheringofeagles.org/

If you can possibly attend do so. If not if you could possibly donate to help with transport please do so. The convoy starts in CA on March 6. Ends up at the Vietnam memorial March 17, just in time to meet Cindy and Jane.

We all jabber jabber jabber. Time to do something else.

Limerick on February 16, 2007 at 10:11 AM

Limerick, they just set up every morning or what?

Esthier on February 16, 2007 at 10:12 AM

You can go by the terminal and check. Flights in and out are usually for R&R troops. Many have left their families already and have to get to DFW as a collection point. Some days it is zero, others two or three flights. Depends.

Call the local USO and they can tell you when and where.
It is a great bunch of people.

Limerick on February 16, 2007 at 10:16 AM

I will always remember my “Thank You” moment. It happened a couple of years after I had gotten out and I went to a Renaissance Faire in the Atlanta area and me and the family went. This was just prior to 9/11 so there wasn’t a lot of the pro military sentiment running around. In other words it was a pre 9/11 world, a date which will be used for a long time as a description unfortunately. Anyway they offered a military discount so I showed my retired ID card and from the other side of the ticket window came a simple “Thank You for your service”. It wasn’t prompted because of any thing other then me showing my ID card. It just came out of the blue. It was the first time I had ever heard that outside of a setting where this sort of thing in normally said such as a Veterans Day parade or Memorial day etc. I made it about 6 steps from the window when I had to stop and compose myself.
So for all of y’all out there that don’t think it is important it is, and it is precious.

LakeRuins on February 16, 2007 at 10:24 AM

Thank you troops for all that you do.
Very inspiring vid Thanks guys we need the good news once in a while :)

ABC Wow! We do need to give props where they are due! They need to know we like to see good news once and a while.

Reward Charles and them with a good comment here.

http://abc.go.com/site/contactus.html?cat=World%20News%20Tonight

P.S. Also congratulate Charles on whipping the tar out NBC while yer at it. ;)

-Wasteland Man.

WastelandMan on February 16, 2007 at 10:31 AM

Wow. This is the best news I’ve seen in a week. I had my thank you back in 1995 when I returned from Kuwait on a regular deployment. We flew into Nashville Airport and when we got off there were a bunch of people with American flags and signs, saying thank you and clapping. It was a nice moment.

It is because of the WW2, Korean and Vietnam vets that I joined. Their sacrifice and commitment inspired me. So I say, “Thank you” to them.

This brought tears to my eyes. There is no greater brotherhood then being a veteran. Those that aren’t one will never know what they are missing and those that are one know the bond that connects them to others regardless of service or time of service. I love seeing old comrades I served with. It always brings a smile to my face.

John F. Kennedy surprisingly said it best, “When there is a visible enemy to fight in open combat, the answer is not so difficult. Many serve – all applaud – and the tide of patriotism runs high. But when there is a long, slow struggle, with no immediate visible foe, your choice will seem hard indeed…

But you have one satisfaction, however difficult those days may be: When you are asked, by a President of the United States or by any other American, what are you doing for your country, no man’s answer will be clearer than your own.”

Thanks Bryan. This was a great post, maybe the best one I’ve seen on Hot Air.

armyvet on February 16, 2007 at 10:34 AM

I try not to make one word posts, but the only word that matters in this post is: “Wow.” Other than that, I don’t have the words.

Savage on February 16, 2007 at 10:40 AM

That is the way it should be. I don’t mean to make this partisan but I guess sometimes it just is. Something tells me that not one person there greeting the troops is a Kerry voter.

Zetterson on February 16, 2007 at 10:51 AM

I sent the link to HuffPo, my bet is there is no chance that they would post it, yet they claim to support the troops

Sven on February 16, 2007 at 10:58 AM

My son emailed me this last night. At 2am, I sat at my desk and bawled.

These folks have been doing this for years now. (They are still doing it in Maine as well)

When Hubs plane landed at DFW, the airport firetrucks met them on the tarmac and shot arches of water over the plane as it taxied in. Then they were met by these folks as they came off the plane.

Hubs said “They made me feel special just for doing my job”

Those people will never know just how much I appreciate all they do. It means more than I can ever put into words.

Tink on February 16, 2007 at 11:05 AM

Watched it on ABC the other day. My damn allergies made it hard to see, so I watched it again, just now. Damn these allergies.

Helloyawl on February 16, 2007 at 11:14 AM

Figures this was in Texas, a red state. It makes me mad that the blue states (NJ, PA) I grew up in have shifted so far to the left that they oughta be in the Pacific Ocean. When I was in the military there were just as many Yankees as there were Southeners. But not anymore, it’s all based on party now. I spoke to a recruiter on my plane last week who said the red states were filling in the ranks and nobody from the blue states were joining up. Conservative America is fighting this war. The media should report THAT!

Tony737 on February 16, 2007 at 11:20 AM

This is a great country.

Period.

heldmyw on February 16, 2007 at 11:22 AM

God. Bless. America.

Theworldisnotenough on February 16, 2007 at 11:45 AM

Thank you Bryan, thank you…

Theworldisnotenough on February 16, 2007 at 11:46 AM

That is just great. I’m damn proud of them – all of them.

World B. Free on February 16, 2007 at 11:50 AM

I’d like to add my thanks to the people at Westover AFRB in Massachusetts that welcomed me and my comrades home in late May of 2003. The hugs and the hot dogs were greatly appreciated.

jeffshultz on February 16, 2007 at 11:52 AM

Two years ago,my son came home from Iraq.Dallas was where he caught his hop home.The airport personnel met them taxiing on their way to the terminal with fountains of water crisscrossed over their jet.They personally welcomed them on the intercom and told them the fountain of water was their welcome home.My battle hardened son said “that was the first time he shed a tear since he left home.” God bless America and God bless our troops.

spazzmomma on February 16, 2007 at 11:57 AM

I’m a Texan and proud of it, but there are good people everywhere who share this man’s sentiment.

Labamigo on February 16, 2007 at 12:15 PM

Makes me cry and smile, and cry again. Only a person with a heart of stone can be left unmoved. I also like the fact that so many Vietnam and other veterans are in the welcoming lines.

Our troops are simply bigger than the rest of us!

Entelechy on February 16, 2007 at 12:31 PM

The soldier, Estes, that’s really what made me cry. What an absolutely wonderful bunch of selfless people doing the right thing for all the right reasons. God bless them all.

As an aside, Limerick, I plan on being at the Memorial March 17. My husband is a Vietnam vet and has never been to The Wall. We can’t think of a better reason to be there.

God Bless the Troops!

Glynn on February 16, 2007 at 12:35 PM

God bless our troops.

bdfaith on February 16, 2007 at 1:13 PM

December 15th, 2004, DFW. I had spent exactly 270 days straight in Afghanistan, without one day off…and now, I was finally home on R&R leave and was walking up a hallway when I heard a bunch of noise start up around the corner. I had no idea what it was. I rounde thed corner and ran into a couple of hundered people cheering and clapping and waving – just like on the film. I was too startled to do much more than walk through the line and acknowledge a few of the people personally. Overwhelming, in a good way.

March 25th, 2005 Bangor Maine Airport. Our flight back home is greeted at a very early hour by three dozen people offering us congratulations, thanks – and jamming cell phones into our hands and telling us to call home. I had to go stand in a corner and compose myself for a minute or two. Once I got myself together I went out and talked with the people for a bit. More than one mentioned that they were determined to give the greeting that they had never received.

Did remind me when I got home from Bosnia in late 1997, I met my wife, alone, at the airport and simply got in the car and went home. Was back at work 5 days later and very few people ever said much. Different times.

major john on February 16, 2007 at 1:19 PM

I just covered the Chicago Auto Show media preview and in the north hall of McCormick Place, right near the Lamborghinis and Lotuses (Loti?), was a recruiting display for the US Army. Killing time between press conferences I went over to thank the soldiers for their service. They were air cav and armored cav (complete with an Apache and a Stryker) and we Americans have every reason to be proud of the men and women who protect us. They are smart, brave and love their country and their fellow Americans.

You don’t have to go to the airport to make a soldier’s day. Just a simple “thanks for your service” whenever you see a member of the US armed forces.

rokemronnie on February 16, 2007 at 1:37 PM

This is what America is really about.

infidel4life on February 16, 2007 at 1:42 PM

Getting weak in my middle age.

Brought tears to my eyes.

Shear joy.

I love my country.

Take care all.

Bogeyfre on February 16, 2007 at 3:01 PM

My CSF (California Scholarship Federation, a HS honor and service society) students are collecting goodies to send overseas as their term 3 community service project. One of our members’ brother is an EOD over in Afghanistan, and he’s agreed to be the conduit for our boxes once we get them together. The kids are stoked about the chance to do something for the troops.

So. The president of the CSF club on campus goes to the blog that supports the town and posts a thread about the effort and soliciting donations. Most people have been warmly supportive of what the kids are doing (and I have even had things get dropped off in my classroom), but one yahoo had to make some snarky comment about how instead of supporting the troops by sending them tangible love we should be writing to congress and complaining that they shouldn’t be over there in the first place and that obviously GWB doesn’t care about the troops or we wouldn’t need to send packages of goodies.

I am happy to say that that person was roundly and soundly taken down and had his/her face rubbed into the much. Basically the sentiment was “if you don’t like the war, fine, but don’t criticize our troops, and you should be PROUD that high school students care enough to do this!”

Not all young people are idiots.

Bob's Kid on February 16, 2007 at 4:04 PM

Oh, and I should add, that while I have never been in the military, my late husband was. Three tours of duty in Vietnam and environs on the USS Sommers. He was very bitter about how he was treated coming back into Long Beach and unfortunately died without ever experiencing the sort of support that this man and others are giving to our troops.

So I really care about this sort of thing!

Bob's Kid on February 16, 2007 at 4:09 PM

Love it. I retired from the USAF in 2003. Before 9/11, I don’t remember getting a “thank you” but afterward I received many. That event reminded some citizens–dare I say most of them–what voluteer military service means to our country.

And, yes, this post affected my “allergies” too.

baldilocks on February 16, 2007 at 4:15 PM

God Bless Bert Grady and all those like him.

Guardian on February 16, 2007 at 4:29 PM

I saw a similar reception for our Heroes in Atlanta’s Hartsfield airport last year when I went to pick up my wife and daughter.

Every soldier got an applause, at least one handshake, and a teddy bear.

Really cool.

rattrap47 on February 16, 2007 at 5:48 PM

It’s not just a middle age thing, this clip made this 25 year old American studying abroad emotional as well. Best “news” I’ve seen in a long time.

Roark on February 16, 2007 at 5:56 PM

Together with that married Marine, these are two stories that will bring pride to your heart, tears to your eyes and fortitude to the will.

Real Americans.

elpresidente on February 16, 2007 at 7:30 PM

Many, many, many S A L U T E S !!!!!!!!!!

……and H U G S !!!!!

oldelpasoan on February 16, 2007 at 7:32 PM

I work as a grocery store bagger-until I can find a full time job-and I make a point of thanking EVERY person in miltary uniform or that can be identified in some way as a veteran for their service. NO EXCEPTIONS!
I had one Korean vet who hugged me and said I was the first person to have said that to him. KOREA, FOLKS!
In 1988 I joined the USMC.
In 1989 I washed out of boot camp because of a physical problem.
Though I’m now married to a former Marine-I’ve always regreted not being able to serve my country.
Freedom isn’t free.
This is my small way of saying thanks to those that have paid for it.

annoyinglittletwerp on February 16, 2007 at 11:14 PM

Wow.

oakpack on February 16, 2007 at 11:31 PM

Thank you troops for all that you do.
Very inspiring vid Thanks guys we need the good news once in a while :)

ABC Wow! We do need to give props where they are due! They need to know we like to see good news once and a while.

Reward Charles and them with a good comment here.

http://abc.go.com/site/contactus.html?cat=World%20News%20Tonight

P.S. Also congratulate Charles on whipping the tar out NBC while yer at it. ;)

-Wasteland Man.

WastelandMan on February 16, 2007 at 10:31 AM

Thanks for the link WastelandMan. This is why Charlie Gibson has moved to number 1.

Thanks for posting Bryan.

God bless Bert Brady and all the other proud Americans giving this gift to our American Heroes.

angryamerican on February 16, 2007 at 11:37 PM

In 1988 I joined the USMC.
In 1989 I washed out of boot camp because of a physical problem…I’ve always regreted not being able to serve my country.

annoyinglittletwerp

No regrets. You did serve, just not as long as you would have liked. In my opinion, anyone who stands and takes the Oath with the intention of fulfilling it has served, even if they are struck dead the next instant.

Rusty Bill on February 16, 2007 at 11:57 PM

That means a lot R.B.
Thanks.*grin*

annoyinglittletwerp on February 17, 2007 at 12:08 AM

I lived in Bangor, Maine during the first Gulf War. The airport was loaded with well wishers each time a plane landed with military folks returning home. Maine has become a liberal test tube due to out of state money pouring in to support pathetic politicians, but there are always good people with their heads on straight in the mix.
God bless our military men and women.
Hening on February 16, 2007 at 9:24 AM

This is one of my fondest memories of coming back from the Gulf.

When flying in to Bangor, all I could think of was how many people it must take to water all the trees….since water trucks went around daily in some places in the Gulf watering the trees.

I remember the adults there, and the kids from the local High School, it was a great Welcome Home.

I still have pictures of that from over one of the hangars.

91Veteran on February 17, 2007 at 12:18 AM

Those are the real hero’s being welcomed home, by REAL Americans, who TRULY support the troops.

…such a contrast to the jackasses in Washington and Hollywood.

I can bet this is happening at airports all over America, but the drive-by media is too damn lame to report much of it, since the rest of America might get the idea there is actually support for the troops.

91Veteran on February 17, 2007 at 12:24 AM

annoyinglittletwerp on February 16, 2007 at 11:14 PM

You were willing to serve and you are hero to me. Thankyou twerp.

infidel on February 17, 2007 at 3:05 AM

:drying off keyboard…AGAIN!

First time cause of the vid, 2nd, cause of yer reaction to twerp, cause I felt the same way about my “service”. Jan – June of ’89 my life was Uncle Sam’s. recycled AIT 3 times (96Romeo) cause I just could not run fast enough.The day I was chaptered out was one of the lowest in my life. I always thank our brothers and sisters in arms when I see them, its the least I can do.

mrfixit on February 17, 2007 at 9:09 AM