Jihadi warriors heroically car-bomb college students, killing 65

posted at 12:22 pm on January 16, 2007 by Allahpundit

They were occupiers. They were occupying the bus stop.

A car bomb and a suicide bomber killed 60 people and wounded 110, including many students blown up as they waited at the entrance to a university in Baghdad on Tuesday, police said…

A police source said a car bomb exploded near the main gate of the Mustansiriya University in an area where students, many of them women, wait for minibuses and cars to pick them up to go home. A suicide bomber on foot then blew himself up near a second gate to the campus as people fled the first explosion.

“The majority of those killed are female students who were on their way home,” a university official said as rescue crews picked through smoldering wreckage and human remains.

The U.N. has released its own numbers of Iraqis killed last year. They’re significantly lower than the Lancet survey estimates — and significantly higher than the Iraqi government’s figures.

Meanwhile, in the relatively peaceful Shiite south, Iran’s quietly building itself a colony.

Iranian intelligence is preparing for complete dominance of southern Iraq when the British withdraw by penetrating Basra’s security network and political parties, it can be revealed.

Iraqi intelligence sources disclosed to The Daily Telegraph that Iran plans to reap the huge financial rewards presented by the southern oil fields and prevent Western businesses from gaining a foothold inside Basra…

The ammunition and weapons used to kill and maim British troops have almost certainly crossed the border from Iran 10 miles outside the city and gone straight into the hands of terrorists…

Iraq’s most senior politicians have no doubts about the ambitions of their eastern neighbour. Speaking during an official visit to London, Tariq al-Hashemi, Iraq’s vice-president, accused Iran of “playing a disastrous role in our internal affairs”. “We have plenty of evidence that Iran is becoming, unfortunately, the main player in Iraq. They do have a deep influence on everything in Iraq. Wherever you go in Iraq, you see their fingerprints on everything.”

Bush’s speech didn’t change many minds, either.

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Update: There are so many injuries from today’s attack, the local hospitals are appealing on television for blood donations.

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“We have plenty of evidence that Iran is becoming, unfortunately, the main player in Iraq. They do have a deep influence on everything in Iraq. Wherever you go in Iraq, you see their fingerprints on everything.”

The Iraqis know this and so do our troops. The Democrats and the ISG either don’t know or don’t care.

Bryan on January 16, 2007 at 12:28 PM

The ISG? Why bring them up? They disappeared off the map, as far as I can tell, when Bush shrugged off their “suggestions” last month. ISG was never going to be seriously considered, and rightfully so.

lorien1973 on January 16, 2007 at 12:34 PM

I wonder what the Dems, MSM, Jimmy Carter, the UN, Hillary, the swimmer, the Vietnam Vet, the dress stainer, Mz. Matthews, and the rest would react if the following were the case:

“We have plenty of evidence that IranIsreal is becoming, unfortunately, the main player in Iraq. They do have a deep influence on everything in Iraq. Wherever you go in Iraq, you see their fingerprints on everything.”

PinkyBigglesworth on January 16, 2007 at 12:35 PM

What is the point of this attack (as much as these attack have points)? What Muslim blows himself up to kill Muslims civilians? Is this a Sunni vs. Shiite thing?

frankj on January 16, 2007 at 12:36 PM

frankj, at this point it seems to me that jihadists or whatever the bloodthirsty thugs want to call themselves will kill others for pretty much any reason, as if reason has anything to do with it. Women going to school? kill them. Speaking out against Islam in any way? kill them. Trying to leave Islam? kill them. Do you detect a pattern?

bbz123 on January 16, 2007 at 12:41 PM

Iranian intelligence is preparing for complete dominance of southern Iraq when the British withdraw by penetrating Basra’s security network and political parties, it can be revealed.

But I’m sure if we pull out now everything will turn out fine.

Chad on January 16, 2007 at 12:43 PM

Is this a Sunni vs. Shiite thing?

Yes, as well as an Iran Thing. Welcome to Hell ( first theirs, then posibly ours )

Janos Hunyadi on January 16, 2007 at 12:43 PM

frankj: from the article

The bombings bore the marks of Sunni Arab insurgents. Many from Saddam’s Sunni minority were outraged by the latest hanging following a trial for crimes against humanity and saw the beheading of his brother Barzan Ibrahim al-Tikriti as an act of revenge, not the mishap the Shi’ite-led government said it was.

The outrage bar is pretty low in Iraq these days.

honora on January 16, 2007 at 12:46 PM

What is the point of this attack?

Kill smart people. Education is their enemy. Killing female students is even more important. They believe a woman’s place is at home raising little Jihadists.

BohicaTwentyTwo on January 16, 2007 at 12:47 PM

The U.N. number is 30+ and the Iraqi Gov’t is 12+ thousand – I’m having a hard time deciding whom to believe…

Entelechy on January 16, 2007 at 12:48 PM

The Cambodia slaughters focused on the educated, so did Stalin; also, see Burma or Myanmar…also constantly a threat the students of Iran…

However, I don’t think this might have been such a focused move, and simply one where there were many people, especially of the other belief…

Entelechy on January 16, 2007 at 12:51 PM

Iran is the single biggest problem that is faced by all who are in Iraq. I believe Iran has southern Iraq in mind for conquest and has been taking clandestine action to this end for some time.

It is sad to see these events unfolding so clearly, to see how we are playing right into their hands, and feel that there is nothing that we can do about it because of the dominance of the left and the incompetence of those in power in the United States.

omegaram on January 16, 2007 at 12:53 PM

My heart goes out to the families of those killed/wounded in this attack. Were they targeted because they were primarily women seeking an education? Iraqis and all of us should embrace the 21st Century and reject the 6th century thinking of Islamists. You don’t win support for your position by killing children or women. The good which can come out of this terrible tragedy is that the resolve to wipe out the “insurrectionists” should be strengthened.

Doug on January 16, 2007 at 12:56 PM

How DARE those dirty females try to get an education?! They must DIE!

Waiting for a statement from our “liberal” commentors defending the jihadis’ actions today. Any feminists out there wanna defend this act of terr … freedom from imperialist crusaders?

This is exactly what’s gonna happen right here in N. America if we stop fighting terrorists in the Middle East. The London Tube, Madrid Train Station, Belsan school masacre, Baghdad college girl attack. If we don’t keep the war over there, it’s comin’ here. Grand Central Station, Yale, Harvard, Princeton, Berkley, Chicago Loop, Golden Gate Bridge, The Twin Towers … oh wait, they already got that … *BEFORE* WE WENT INTO IRAQ! Read carefully Libs … We haven’t been hit since 9/11 because … (drumroll please) … because we’re killing them OVER THERE and not giving the chance to come HERE! Get it?

Tony737 on January 16, 2007 at 12:59 PM

Now thinking about the benefits to the US of succeeding in Iraq versus the costs the US would have to bear to achieve them, do you think: the benefits outweigh the costs, (or) the costs outweigh the benefits?

This question is very misleading and frames the thinking in a way that few people would even talk about generally: that is, framing Iraq as though the US were there for some benefit to itself. There’s very little benefit in staying in Iraq compared to the cost of staying there, but that’s not the point. This question excludes the cost of leaving Iraq as a possible response, and thus sets up a false argument.

I would have written it, “Now thinking about the costs to the US for succeeding in Iraq versus the costs of withdrawing from Iraq, do you think: remaining is more costly, (or) withdrawing is more costly?”

Lehosh on January 16, 2007 at 1:02 PM

“The U.N. number is 30+ and the Iraqi Gov’t is 12+ thousand – I’m having a hard time deciding whom to believe…”

Has the UN ever given you reason to believe them before? Why start now?

darwin on January 16, 2007 at 1:02 PM

No need to fear, 20,000 troops are on their way and once they get there it will be hard to tell Iraq from New Jersey.

JaHerer22 on January 16, 2007 at 1:04 PM

“because we’re killing them OVER THERE and not giving the chance to come HERE! Get it?”

If we keep letting them immigrate and continue to ignore the growing isalmic presence here it wouldn’t be long before we look like the UK and Europe. Touchy feely decisions based on PC will be our downfall.

Same with the illegal alien situation.

darwin on January 16, 2007 at 1:06 PM

“We have plenty of evidence that Iran Isreal Mexico is becoming, unfortunately, the main player in Iraq the United States. They do have a deep influence on everything in Iraq. Wherever you go in Iraq the United States, you see their fingerprints on everything.”

PinkyBigglesworth on January 16, 2007 at 1:12 PM

darwin, no, I don’t believe the U.N. My point was that I don’t believe either…

Entelechy on January 16, 2007 at 1:14 PM

It’s about outrage but it’s more about keeping up the chaos to convince us that Iraq is unsalvagable so that we get out. Our exit in defeat helps the Iranians most of all, while it helps the defeated Sunnis as well, and would hurt us for decades to come.

I brought up the ISG because it’s still somewhat relevant in Iraq. The Iraqis are accutely aware of our politics here, and see signs of our withdrawal as the coming of a very dark and dangerous period for them.

Contrary to what leftists like honora think, the average Iraqi may not love the US but sees us now as the last strong fair broker in their country. The militias, terrorists, insurgents and Iranian agents are all threats to them, and they see us as the only force that can possibly fix their country and deal with all those dangerous elements.

So sure, the Sunnis are just outraged that their guys got hung. Is such outrage even worth mentioning, though? Is is justifiable in any way to kill college students because you’re angry that one of Saddam’s henchmen had a bad day with the noose?

Bryan on January 16, 2007 at 1:15 PM

Welcome back Bryan.

Darwin, you are so right, man. The London Tube jihadis were “homegrown”, as were the Madrid Train bombers and the clowns who got busted tryin’ to blow up the Canadian Parliment building.

Tony737 on January 16, 2007 at 1:30 PM

What is the point of this attack (as much as these attack have points)? What Muslim blows himself up to kill Muslims civilians? Is this a Sunni vs. Shiite thing?

It’s a “Chick” thing. I really think they wanted to kill women because they’re sick little cowards.

Candy Slice on January 16, 2007 at 1:44 PM

The Iraqis know this and so do our troops. The Democrats and the ISG either don’t know or don’t care.

Bryan on January 16, 2007 at 12:28 PM

I think everyone would agree it’s the latter, no?

And your lenghty comment:

Bryan on January 16, 2007 at 1:15 PM

Is spot on. It’s always difficult to explain this to people, but the media and the Democrats have truly caused the war to go the way it has. If they hadn’t started seeing an election around the corner by mid to late 2003, and hadn’t divided the country over Iraq, the enemy would not have been emboldened… This is why attacks were stepped up around the elections to ensure a Dem victory, why terrorist groups endorsed the Dems, why Zawahiri took credit for the victory, etc. etc. These Dems divided the country on this “Bush lied about WMDs” crap and the POS media didn’t inform the public that these Dems spent the previous 13 years making a stronger WMD case and that this was ALL election politics. I’m sick to my stomach over this every day, because I don’t know if it’s possible to win given the state of the Democratic Party and the media. They have been fighting to have us lose, because if the war is a failure they win elections by default, which is the only way they can win because they have no positions or ideas on any issues.

Interesting side note, does the media report that there were people going to college in Iraq? No, only if they were blown up. Anyone else find that…. odd? Not that Iraq is in good shape, but it’s not like everyone is shivering in a corner in their house because if they walk outside they’re in a mine field. I mean, wouldn’t you think going to college would be on the bottom of peoples’ lists of priorities? Again, clearly the situation over there isn’t good, but how do they explain that people were going to a university in Baghdad!?

RightWinged on January 16, 2007 at 1:48 PM

Don’t you get it… they are just opening ‘negotiations’ with us. This is just their opening offer – their way of saying ‘Bend over!’.

The Democrats and the ISG either don’t know or don’t care.

Bryan on January 16, 2007 at 12:28 PM

I’ll take ‘Betting on it’ for $500 Bryan….

For the Democrats to win in ’08 they need more and more dead americans (and Iraqi’s) in Iraq – the more bloodshed the better for them.

CrazyFool on January 16, 2007 at 1:52 PM

Contrary to what leftists like honora think, the average Iraqi may not love the US but sees us now as the last strong fair broker in their country

See the attached. Look at page 51, poll of Iraqis by British Ministry of Defence. 82% “strongly opposed” to coalition forces presence. (I have spent a lot of years in marketing, and market research. Any 5 point scale that gets 82% on the top point is an extraordinarily strong indication)

http://www.brookings.edu/fp/saban/iraq/index.pdf

honora on January 16, 2007 at 2:06 PM

But I’m sure if we pull out now everything will turn out fine.

As long as the dems can blame bush, I’m sure it is ok with them.

With regards the people who want to pull out, I do not understand why we as a nation do not have the spine to get the job done. We have only been there a few years and people were already complaining that Iraq was not a utopia after one year.

Our brave soldiers are fighting and deserve our support in GETTING THE JOB DONE. This job must be completed or we as a nation will pay a horrible cost and our soldiers will have died in vain.

How long did it take to pacify Japan and Germany and turn them into peaceful democracies? We still have bases there.

jman on January 16, 2007 at 2:08 PM

What is the point of this attack (as much as these attack have points)? What Muslim blows himself up to kill Muslims civilians? Is this a Sunni vs. Shiite thing?

Thes suicide bombmers feels it’s more manly to kill innocent women and girls etc to save time of trying to date any of them or rape them as that would be fine by thier mind set. Blowing himself up he feels he goes striaght to the 72 virgin territory in the sky. SATAN’s WORK is working Pray that we succeed and win before we get any of those boneheads over here and also cut all immagaration to our country to no more than 250 k before we are over run, not only by muslims but any ethnicity until we can control ALL our borders

bones47 on January 16, 2007 at 2:14 PM

Iraq – Where getting a scholarship is more dangerous then a draft notice.
Put that in yer pipe Mr Kerry and smoke it!

LakeRuins on January 16, 2007 at 2:21 PM

How long did it take to pacify Japan and Germany and turn them into peaceful democracies? We still have bases there.

jman on January 16, 2007 at 2:08 PM

Well the comparison is off the mark, but once the war was over, neither the Germans nor the Japanese put up much resistance.

The comparison is not apt as we were at war with these countries, we’re not at war with Iraq so much as we’re at war in Iraq.

Here’s another interesting study

http://www.worldpublicopinion.org/pipa/pdf/sep06/Iraq_Sep06_rpt.pdf

honora on January 16, 2007 at 2:22 PM

And of course you can always trust polls and never have to take into accout how the question was asked, who did the asking, and what the respondent might have seen or heard in the rumor mill that day that affected his answer. Nothing in Iraq is as simple as an answer to a poll question, or an interview on the street for that matter, like the ones I conducted. Nothing there is simple, straightforward or easy to distill into soundbites.

I agree, though, that we’re not at war with Iraq, just in Iraq, against various players with a wide variety of intentions and agendas.

Bryan on January 16, 2007 at 2:39 PM

Well the comparison is off the mark, but once the war was over, neither the Germans nor the Japanese put up much resistance.

You are making my point. If it took so long to transition these destroyed countries, who could no longer fight back, into democracies, wouldn’t it naturally take a longer time for Iraq, especially since our politicians and media tie the hands of our soldiers and wonder why we are not advancing as quickly as they would like? I think it unreasonable to do so in less than 10 years. But in our culture, that is about nine years too long.

jman on January 16, 2007 at 2:40 PM

I agree, though, that we’re not at war with Iraq, just in Iraq, against various players with a wide variety of intentions and agendas.

Bryan on January 16, 2007 at 2:39 PM

I agree, and our refusal to go after them (Muqtada al-Sadr for example) is prolonging our conflict.

jman on January 16, 2007 at 2:44 PM

What will it take to convince some of the Sunni fighters to stage a couple of attacks in Iran? Ya know little attention getters to let Ahmadinnerjacket know he ain’t taking over like he thinks.

LakeRuins on January 16, 2007 at 2:50 PM

Hmmm.

Iran is making IEDs powerful enough to blow up an M1 Abrams and smuggling them into Iraq.

Iran was CAUGHT using a “diplomatic mission” to spread terrorism in the area where the Kurds are.

Iran is funneling arms to the Shiite militias.

Iran is planing to take over southern Iraq (where most of Iraq’s oil is and where their oil terminal is) once the Brits leave (so says the story).

And when the President says he intends to move against Iran (and Syria) for their activities THAT RESULT IN DEAD AMERICANS, the “honorable” Senator Joseph Biden (D), who fancies himself as President, gets all huffy on national TV and demands that the President not protect the troops by going after the source of the problem.

The Democratic Party is a party of fools and worse who are willing to risk the destruction of the country in order to regain power.

Potestas Democraticorum delenda est!

georgej on January 16, 2007 at 2:55 PM

You are making my point. If it took so long to transition these destroyed countries, who could no longer fight back, into democracies, wouldn’t it naturally take a longer time for Iraq, especially since our politicians and media tie the hands of our soldiers and wonder why we are not advancing as quickly as they would like? I think it unreasonable to do so in less than 10 years. But in our culture, that is about nine years too long.

jman on January 16, 2007 at 2:40 PM

Again, huge differences.

Are we destroying Iraq? Why? Are the Iraqis fighting back? Why?

The biggest job re-building Japan and Germany was to quite literally re-build. The job in Iraq is to convince people that they need to adopt a Western form, or at least Western friendly, cohesive society and government.

Which one of these jobs would you want to take on? Right.

honora on January 16, 2007 at 3:14 PM

We’ve taken on that job already. It’s either that or let a dozen pre-war Afghanistans bloom.

We have very few good options in this war and a whole list of bad options that might actually work given enough time and effort, but the most ridiculous option taken by the most number of Americans is the one that is the most likely to get a lot more Americans killed; to wit, pretending that the jihadis have a legitimate grievance (Sunni outrage, Palestinian plight, whatever) that we can wave away if we just elected the right people or adopted the right set of talking points.

Bryan on January 16, 2007 at 3:24 PM

The job in Iraq is to convince people that they need to adopt a Western form, or at least Western friendly, cohesive society and government.

How does withdrawing our troops and letting Iran instigate a civil war accomplish this?

Bryan on January 16, 2007 at 3:24 PM

Amen.

jman on January 16, 2007 at 3:31 PM

I think it unreasonable to do so in less than 10 years.

jman on January 16, 2007 at 2:40 PM

I see that you are an optimist. I was thinking that the peoples of western civilization will be at war with Islam and the Jihadists for something more like 10 generations, or perhaps until the end of the world itself.

The job in Iraq is to convince people that they need to adopt a Western form, or at least Western friendly, cohesive society and government.

honora on January 16, 2007 at 3:14 PM

I am surprised at you honora. This statement seems to subscribe to George W. Bush’s vein of thinking. You SHOULD be more supportive of John Kerry’s position, which is to withdraw immediately, since the job clearly can not be accomplished by the likes of the lazy and uneducated individuals that comprise the forces of the U.S. military
(John Kerry’s vein of thinking — NOT mine).

CyberCipher on January 16, 2007 at 3:39 PM

I see that you are an optimist. I was thinking that the peoples of western civilization will be at war with Islam and the Jihadists for something more like 10 generations, or perhaps until the end of the world itself.

Not if out Congress has its way. They will have rolled over long before then – possibly within the next two years.

jman on January 16, 2007 at 4:00 PM

Car bombs going off in Baghdad vs Airplanes striking buildings in NY City.

Which would I chose ?

William Amos on January 16, 2007 at 4:17 PM

The outrage bar is pretty low in Iraq these days.

honora on January 16, 2007 at 12:46 PM

The outrage judgement squad has finally arrived! Now we don’t have to decide how we “feel” about this ungodly situation.

Thank God for Honora and her friends. Now we don’t have to think for ourselves, just go along with the program. Let them “judge” whether we have “crossed the bar.”

What outrages you, my dear Honora? Is it the unjust execution of these miscreants? Is it the treatment they were given on their Judgement Day?

Does the trial process bother you? (does me, BTW)? Do you think they are guilty of the crimes alleged?

Not being facecious. I have a sister who thinks along your lines and I’m just trying to get some insight.

My own personal outrage bar has been crossed a while ago…well we haven’t the space here for that.

hillbillyjim on January 16, 2007 at 5:01 PM

And of course you can always trust polls and never have to take into accout how the question was asked, who did the asking, and what the respondent might have seen or heard in the rumor mill that day that affected his answer. Nothing in Iraq is as simple as an answer to a poll question, or an interview on the street for that matter, like the ones I conducted. Nothing there is simple, straightforward or easy to distill into soundbites.

I agree, though, that we’re not at war with Iraq, just in Iraq, against various players with a wide variety of intentions and agendas.

Bryan on January 16, 2007 at 2:39 PM

Absolutely. I wish I’d have said it that way but that’s why you’re there doing what you do and I’m here reading your product, wishing I’d have said it just that way.

Thank you.

hillbillyjim on January 16, 2007 at 5:20 PM

Of course if Duh drifter comes along, he’ll convene a Council on Spelling and Unqualified English Usage.

Then we’ll be in BIG trouble.

hillbillyjim on January 16, 2007 at 5:24 PM

Any 5 point scale that gets 82% on the top point is an extraordinarily strong indication

If it came from a reputable objective source. Brookings Instiute is hardly middle road, they call themselves to the left. That is like NYT calling themselves a little to the left, however the NYT say they are down the middle.

World Public Opinion, look who is on their board.

right2bright on January 16, 2007 at 5:45 PM

The simple fact that there ARE students, much less FEMALE STUDENTS, is something that the Wahabbists and Islamists would surely love to suppress.

But then again, why suppress that which is being ignored? I call SHAME!

hillbillyjim on January 16, 2007 at 6:06 PM

The outrage judgement squad has finally arrived! Now we don’t have to decide how we “feel” about this ungodly situation.

Thank God for Honora and her friends. Now we don’t have to think for ourselves, just go along with the program. Let them “judge” whether we have “crossed the bar.”

What outrages you, my dear Honora? Is it the unjust execution of these miscreants? Is it the treatment they were given on their Judgement Day?

Does the trial process bother you? (does me, BTW)? Do you think they are guilty of the crimes alleged?

Not being facecious. I have a sister who thinks along your lines and I’m just trying to get some insight.

My own personal outrage bar has been crossed a while ago…well we haven’t the space here for that.

hillbillyjim on January 16, 2007 at 5:01 PM

I don’t really understand what it is you are trying to say. My comments suggest that in Iraq today, people are easily outraged and act on that outrage: witness the car bomb incident that is the topic of this post and the link article wherein the premise is that this attack was the result of “outrage” on the part of Sunni insurgents over the Saddam hanging.

Hope this helps.

honora on January 17, 2007 at 9:10 AM

Absolutely. I wish I’d have said it that way but that’s why you’re there doing what you do and I’m here reading your product, wishing I’d have said it just that way.

Thank you.

hillbillyjim on January 16, 2007 at 5:20 PM

There is a new poll out from the State Dept, conducted by Gallup. Shows the same results as the two I posted–one of which was conducted by the British Defence Dept.

State of Denial–wonder what Woodward meant by that?

honora on January 17, 2007 at 9:14 AM

I am surprised at you honora. This statement seems to subscribe to George W. Bush’s vein of thinking.

Not really, I am stating what the job is (frankly better than Bush does, but that another issue). The question is: is this a job that our military can accomplish? I don’t think so, as it is not a military task at its core.

We’ll see.

honora on January 17, 2007 at 9:17 AM

Not a military task? Then fighting jihadis oughta be done by …?

Cheerleaders? Rah rah shish boom bah! Plug your ears and LA LA LA!

Peaceniks? We saw what happened the last time THAT was tried. Sliiiiiiiice *thud*

Cops? You have right to remain silent. You have … an RPG! … (Monty Python) RUN AWAY! RUN AWAY!

The U.N.? They got hit ONCE and punked out the next day.

Condi? Should we have our Sec. of State meet their S.o.S.? They don’t HAVE one! They’re terrorists! They’re “stateless”!

Jimmy Carter? No, let’s keep our former presidents alive, shall we?

So what’s the answer? If this is not a military task, then what is it?

And if you don’t think our Troops can do it, who can?

Tony737 on January 17, 2007 at 10:02 AM

Not a military task? Then fighting jihadis oughta be done by …?

Cheerleaders? Rah rah shish boom bah! Plug your ears and LA LA LA!

Peaceniks? We saw what happened the last time THAT was tried. Sliiiiiiiice *thud*

Cops? You have right to remain silent. You have … an RPG! … (Monty Python) RUN AWAY! RUN AWAY!

The U.N.? They got hit ONCE and punked out the next day.

Condi? Should we have our Sec. of State meet their S.o.S.? They don’t HAVE one! They’re terrorists! They’re “stateless”!

Jimmy Carter? No, let’s keep our former presidents alive, shall we?

So what’s the answer? If this is not a military task, then what is it?

And if you don’t think our Troops can do it, who can?

Tony737 on January 17, 2007 at 10:02 AM

I made this statement:

The job in Iraq is to convince people that they need to adopt a Western form, or at least Western friendly, cohesive society and government.

honora on January 16, 2007 at 3:14 PM

Ever served in the military? Enlighten me as to when you were trained to convince people to adopt a new form of government and culture.

honora on January 17, 2007 at 10:25 AM

Yes I did serve in the military and I love how you answer a question with a question and dodge once again the question I asked you. I served before 9/11, in case you haven’t noticed, things have changed a bit since then. The military IS working with local and national elected officials AND everyday civilians. As Bryan said after being there himself, we need to have our govt civil affairs experts there too. Military civil affairs have been there all along. But the security situation has to dealt with. My question to you was, if not the military then who? The American Idol judges? I eagerly await your answer.

Tony737 on January 17, 2007 at 2:01 PM