Muzzling the Veggie Tales

posted at 8:58 am on September 29, 2006 by Bryan

God edited out of Veggie Tales
NCR intvu with Phil Vischer
Bozell: Sliced and diced
Madonna to hang from crucifix
NBC chickens out on Mo toons

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Good grief. I am not much of a religios man. But NBC’s aversion to god in their content is just silly. Is the seclular humanistic left really that frightened of competing ideas?

chow on September 29, 2006 at 9:08 AM

It’s wonder anyone still airs “A Christmas Carole”!

Dread Pirate Roberts VI on September 29, 2006 at 9:15 AM

Thanks for this vent Michelle. I’ve been following this story since it was announced that NBC would be showing VeggiTales. I told my son that Veggie Tales would be on regular TV, but they took out all the references to God, he looked at me and said, “Why did they do that? That’s stupid.” Which I think sums it up best.

vcferlita on September 29, 2006 at 9:16 AM

Don’t you know that the Bill of Rights provides for
Freedom FROM religion?

But ask yourself if you hate all references to religion – How many trucks full of food, water, and clothing did the ACLU send to Hurricane victims last year?

How many did religious organizations send?

And why are the ACLU offices closed on 25 December?

Wander on September 29, 2006 at 9:37 AM

God bless you too Michelle (and Hot Air).

speed647 on September 29, 2006 at 9:45 AM

Pundits walk around scratching their heads trying to figure out why American society is falling apart. Rampant school violence, gang warfare, drug abuse, promiscuity from the president’s office to the principals office… the list goes on.

Is it so hard to understand that if we indoctrinate our population into the ways of instant gratification and violence, that that is the path we will take when faced with life’s tough decisions?

Even if you are against religion it is hard to argue with the value of many of the lessons of the Bible.

May God keep you.

12thman on September 29, 2006 at 9:51 AM

This another example why Coulter wrote Godless. They keep proving her right on a daily basis.

roninacreage on September 29, 2006 at 9:56 AM

I hope Phil is using his sell-out money to advance the Gospel.

Valiant on September 29, 2006 at 9:56 AM

Absolutely brilliant vent. The juxtaposition alone makes the argument. With that kind of spotlight, NBC programming executives should be scurrying back to the dark corners of the cultural kitchen.

Laserlawyer on September 29, 2006 at 10:03 AM

I subscribe to the Big Idea newsletter. Here is an excerpt from the email concerning the ruckus.

Recognizing that we are making a difference to Saturday morning TV by bringing programming that is “absent of bad and has a presence of good” to homes across America, would we still prefer to air the un-edited versions of VeggieTales on TV? Absolutely! It’s there where we’re able to share a Bible verse and encourage kids by telling them God made them special and He loves them very much. For now, we’re hoping a new cross section of kids will fall in love with Bob & Larry, go deeper into VeggieTales and eventually fall in love with the God who made them. It’s the same “big idea” we’ve worked on for over 13 years.

You can also send comments to Big Idea at VeggieTV@BigIdea.com

vcferlita on September 29, 2006 at 10:09 AM

And they wonder whats wrong with our kids and our society today??? DUH!

shooter on September 29, 2006 at 10:11 AM

Indeed, Laser. Not only is that a concern. Remember a few years back about a 7th grade social studies book that explicitly use words devoted to two full chapters with words like “Mohammed”, “Islam”, “Jihad”, “Allah”,“sets guidelines for the treatment of women” and “Islam as a way of life”. This is a mandated by education officials in California. Guess what? The book “Across the Centuries” isn’t exclusive in California but schools in Colorado, Minnesota, Ohio and Washington where of all places in the Whittier County Christian Schools.

Hey, Wander. Better look again about freedom FROM religion in public schools. You’re getting suckered in.

Kokonut on September 29, 2006 at 10:15 AM

You gotta love the crocodile tears from the creators–golly, we had no idea that our concept would/could be altered. Give me a break. Seems like writing and living values and two different things.

honora on September 29, 2006 at 10:18 AM

Kokonut on September 29, 2006 at 10:15 AM
The book “Across the Centuries” isn’t exclusive in California but schools in Colorado

where is that info please , I need to know about Colorado.

shooter on September 29, 2006 at 10:19 AM

Check my link, shooter.

Kokonut on September 29, 2006 at 10:27 AM

Michelle, I couldn’t help but notice a brighter sparkle in your eyes, and an extra warmth in your smile this morning. Could it be that He was smiling down on you? Thank you so, so much!!

JD on September 29, 2006 at 10:33 AM

Beautiful vent. I appreciate the blessing.
I was not aware of Veggie Tales but it looks adorable! I will have to ask my neices and if they dont know, that is one less Christmas gift to worry about! Thanks for the heads-up!

labwrs on September 29, 2006 at 10:38 AM

The F-Word… The G-Word… The C-Word…

How juvenile. They are just words.

The piece fails to recognize that those are public airwaves, owned by the public. Are you sure that you want “state approved” religious messages? How would you feel if it those vegetables were spewing forth Islamic values? Or quoting the Koran? “Remember boys and girls, that you are special, and if you take one step towards Allah, he will take ten steps towards you.”

GregH on September 29, 2006 at 10:41 AM

Great Vent. I saw the news on the Big Idea website about the saturday morning shows and I remember being surprised that one of the networks would go for it. Phil Vischer makes an interesting point:

Vischer: I’m baffled when we Christians are shocked that the world is acting worldly. I wasn’t surprised at all. I’m hoping the reaction doesn’t turn into a letter-writing campaign to make a big stinky fit. It’s NBC. What did you expect them to do? Jesus warned us that we will not be popular.

But it would be nice to see Big Idea stand by their principles and pull out of the deal. This is the sort of thing that caused Vischer to lose the company.

Jezla on September 29, 2006 at 10:43 AM

My kids love those videos. But I have to confess I couldn’t eat salad for a month after I first saw it. Didn’t feel right.

I’m reluctant to admit it, but I agree with honora on one point. If the creators feel so strongly about their message, why didn’t they just kill the deal with NBC and walk away from the money?

It’s the nature of network television these days, I’m afraid. Frankly, I’m amazed The 10 Commandments is still played each year around Easter. And I fully expect them to edit out Linus’ recitation of the nativity story on A Charlie Brown Christmas eventually.

SailorDave on September 29, 2006 at 10:45 AM

cockroaches, just dont die or go away.

shooter on September 29, 2006 at 10:46 AM

Just as God’s word is actually playing out, as the Bible always said it would, in real life all around us, more and more visibly, every day(what Godless liberal would have ever dreamed that Jerusalem would actually become the worlds “cup of trembling”), so too are the Godless among us living out their part in the scheme of things, “waxing worse and worse, lying, deceiving, and being deceived”.

And as they play their secular anti God part in God’s plan for man, we even get to watch the “religion of peace” again spreading their anti God message of death throughout the world too.

The dry run for them took place centuries ago, but the world was not politically correct enough, nor did it have enough Godless liberal minds, to allow it to succeed back then. But there won’t be any Crusades to save the free world this time, just the United States of America fighting for freedom from oppression, while the rest of the Godless world, and their liberal democrat toadies, do their very best to derail the effort here.

But the truth is that mankind is just getting exactly what he collectively wants, Godlessness. Unfortunately for him and his blindness, taking God out simply creates a huge vaccuum for those things not of God to come in, and he gets to live out the plan accordingly.

You gotta admit, we do live in exciting times these.

NRA4Freedom on September 29, 2006 at 10:48 AM

Is the seclular humanistic left really that frightened of competing ideas?

chow on September 29, 2006 at 9:08 AM

No. Just foolishly frightened of God.

Lawrence on September 29, 2006 at 10:49 AM

You gotta love the crocodile tears from the creators–golly, we had no idea that our concept would/could be altered. Give me a break. Seems like writing and living values and two different things.

honora on September 29, 2006 at 10:18 AM

Maybe so. But before we jump to conclusions, maybe we should check to see if the decisions to alter the videos were made before or after the contracts were inked.

Lawrence on September 29, 2006 at 10:53 AM

GregH,
You just don’t get it. The absolute exclusion of any religious message IS a religious message. It’s a message in favor of atheism or agnosticism at best and one in favor of absolute Godlessness at worst.
And how do you make the jump from “public airwaves” to “state approved” religious messages? It’s not like the US government is paying NBC to broadcast this. They’re privately owned and operated. Sure the FCC applies some restrictions, but guess what – the Constitution denies the government the right to restrict NBC’s right to air religious content. You see, that’s what “make no law respecting religion” really means.
There is no separation of Church and State. That’s a liberal Constitutional myth.
Michael
As for me and my house, we will serve the Lord. And watch Veggietales on DVD.

y2church on September 29, 2006 at 10:55 AM

You want something to be scared of–go see Jesus Camp. YIKES!!!!!!

honora on September 29, 2006 at 10:55 AM

Well it looks like, after that blessing, you can kiss that NBC ‘Hotair’ show goodbye Michelle. Bless you!

I guess they will just have to replace it with videos of beheadings and executions of women who dare to get an education, and don’t forget the gang rapes for family ‘honor’ – all in the name of ‘diversity’ and ‘multi-culturism’ you understand…..

First they replaced the christmas story with ‘Santa Clause’ then came the Easter Bunny (Who needs salvation anyway? We have candy to sell!). Now we have this.

Thanks for the link Kokonut. I had almost forget about ‘Across the Centuries’ and didn’t know it has spread like the cancer it is. I wonder of the NEA is getting a big fat grant to spread this BS…… Time to start looking into private school.

CrazyFool on September 29, 2006 at 10:56 AM

It’s wonder anyone still airs “A Christmas Carole”!

Dread Pirate Roberts VI on September 29, 2006 at 9:15 AM

Not really. While it is a nice moral story, it isn’t really a Biblical based story line.

If it did have a true Biblical theme, I’m sure it would get edited.

Just as in this discussion of Veggie Tales. The overal religious tone of the tales where not edited out, only the Biblical refrences were edited.

Lawrence on September 29, 2006 at 10:56 AM

to reiterate:

“What struck me and continues to strike me is the inanity of ripping the heart and soul out of a successful product and not thinking that there will be consequences to it,”

and for those who asked, or didnt ask.

Vischer, who was responsible for readying episodes for network broadcast, said he didn’t know until just weeks before the shows were to begin airing that nonhistorical references to God and the Bible would have to be removed.
Had he known how much he’d have to change the show – including Bob and Larry’s tagline,

Remember kids, God made you special, and he loves you very much,” that concludes each episode – Vischer said he wouldn’t have signed on for the network deal.
It sold 50 MILLION copies because of the message including GOD, not because its a non-Christian based salad make you feel good show.
This will be one to watch for the day, thats for sure. And Michelle…GOD BLESS YOU TOO! and ALL THE READERS.

shooter on September 29, 2006 at 11:13 AM

For those claiming Vicsher “sold out” or had something to do with this mess, other than be at the mercy of corporate NBC, please do yourselves a favor, get educated on the story and read Phil’s personal blog-story on the whole mess at

Rgds,

Jwehman

jwehman on September 29, 2006 at 11:29 AM

Veggie Creator Phil Vischer is now creating wonderful faith-based children’s books. The new management team is running Veggie Tales in a fashion that is very consistent with Vischer’s vision. In fact they are running the business even better (Vischer has admitted that he wasnt much of a business man, his strengths were on the creative side).

NBC makes their programming decisions based on what they think will make them money. Clouding their judgement is the fact that they believe their values are AMERICA’s values so they think that removing faith references from these cartoons is good for business.

The fact that Veggie Tales has sold over 50 MILLION UNITS (with very little marketing) should say something about the market demand for this type of content, but what do the dumb consumers know, right?

realVerse on September 29, 2006 at 11:37 AM

Well done

Karl on September 29, 2006 at 12:13 PM

For those claiming Vicsher “sold out” or had something to do with this mess, other than be at the mercy of corporate NBC, please do yourselves a favor, get educated on the story and read Phil’s personal blog-story on the whole mess at

Rgds,

Jwehman

jwehman on September 29, 2006 at 11:29 AM

Sorry but business is business. He sold his artistic rights presumably not at the point of a gun. Classic case of wanting to have one’s cake and eat it too. He cashed the check so he needs to shut up.

And as someone above said or implied, the market will decide.

honora on September 29, 2006 at 12:23 PM

MM:
No one does the Vent like you. Keep up the good work. Great Vent!

d1carter on September 29, 2006 at 12:29 PM

Amen and God Bless

MarkB on September 29, 2006 at 12:31 PM

If the creators feel so strongly about their message, why didn’t they just kill the deal with NBC and walk away from the money?

I dunno, maybe they thought that “something” was better than “nothing.” Have you watched Saturday Morning cartoons lately? no more Bugs, Daffy and Roadrunner. It’s filled with violence. Maybe that was their point – to provide an alternative to what is on tv nowadays.

That being said, the Veggie Tales videos are excellent and are available to rent or purchase. So, we are all free to show them to our kids. Personally, I think they are hilarious and fun to watch – all while sending a Christian message. Win-Win situation, IMHO.

pullingmyhairout on September 29, 2006 at 12:56 PM

12thman, you are spot on.
I am an atheist, and as I see it religeon is a choice and a covenant you make with your own god. But even I can see that a large porion of the problems in America stem from our children not having a moral code. Any system which supports society by promoting the basic virtues:
1) No murderering
2) No stealing
3) no lying
4) treat people fairly, as you want to be treated
5) no adultery (which is a part of #2, and can end up to #1)
Is a pretty damn good basis for building a strong society.

Today though, parents don’t take the time to teach their kids whats right, and religeon is passe. Instant gratification is the lord now, and we wonder why the world is spiriling into a cess pit.

Wyrd on September 29, 2006 at 1:00 PM

Sorry but business is business. He sold his artistic rights presumably not at the point of a gun. Classic case of wanting to have one’s cake and eat it too. He cashed the check so he needs to shut up.

honora on September 29, 2006 at 12:23 PM

There ya go again, opening your pie hole and not even knowing what you’re talking about yet once more.

The show’s creator, Phil Vischer, said he didn’t know that references to God and the Bible would have to be removed until a week before the show began airing.

Had he known, Vischer said he wouldn’t have signed on to the deal.

My son’s 13 now, but he grew up watching Veggie Tales. My 23-yo daughter had a baby boy 3 months ago and I already have him stocked up on Veggie Tales CD’s. While it’s directed at juveniles, obviously, I really enjoyed watching them with my son. It’s a great little show. Now, I get to watch them some more with my Grandson. I am very grateful for that. It’s the little things that seem to matter most. Despite anything Network TV does, parents and Guardians have the absolute responsibility to watch over their children and guide them through their childhood & adolescence, absolutely including what’s watched on TV.

NBC and all the rest of the TV broadcasters can air, or not air, what they want to. We can always change the channel if we don’t like it. With 1,000 channels to choose from, I very rarely watch Network TV anyway, except for maybe my local news. Network TV consists mostly of the purest garbage, tripe, and fecal matter anyway. Their double standards and Godless beliefs have been apparent for a very long time. God gave us all the inalienable right, and ability, to choose. I choose to not watch 99% of the garbage on TV, and the 1% I watch is because I choose to. The channels I don’t want my children to watch are locked out with a password, including all the networks such as NBC. I don’t see their commercials, ergo, I don’t see their sponsors. I buy what I need, not what I have pounded into my senses. I can access whatever content I choose to watch from over 1,000 channels so it makes little difference what NBC or anyone else airs or doesn’t air.

SilverStar830 on September 29, 2006 at 1:10 PM

SilverStar830:

The show’s creator, Phil Vischer, said he didn’t know that references to God and the Bible would have to be removed until a week before the show began airing.

And whose fault is that? Sorry, read your contracts Phil.

honora on September 29, 2006 at 1:14 PM

God bless you for devoting this vent to this subject. I hope that some Christian groups will make note of the companies sponsoring these cartoon broadcasts, and will contact them and indicate they are considering a boycott of their products unless Veggie Tales reverts back to its normal religious message.

donsingleton on September 29, 2006 at 1:15 PM

My oldest watches those Japanese anime cartoons. Now THAT is some seriously empty entertainment.

Something I’ve learned as a parent is that I can’t assume any form of pre-packaged entertainment (especially on TV), or anything in the outside world for that matter, is going to impart my values to my kids. In fact, I spend a lot of my time and energy counteracting the bad messages they seem to pick up from this constant external barrage.

Like I said, my kids have some of the Veggie Tale videos. If those videos reinforce what I try to teach, so much the better. But I would never look to broadcast television as any form of moral guidebook. It hasn’t been since at least the early seventies.

Please don’t misunderstand me. I am not defending NBC here. It is, indeed, troubling that they seem so afraid of Christianity. After all, I think we are pretty decent people.

SailorDave on September 29, 2006 at 1:28 PM

God bless you, Michelle and thank you for this Vent. My granddaughter absolutely loves VeggieTales and my grandson will follow suit, I’m sure, he’s only 4 months old.

donna91 on September 29, 2006 at 1:31 PM

Can we get link or better yet a phone number to blast NBC with?

Theworldisnotenough on September 29, 2006 at 1:36 PM

Nice vent Michelle.

I am not a parent, so I don’t really know anything about the Veggie Tales, and I am not a hardcore religious person. I simply believe in God, and that’s it, but I can comment on the F word vs the G and C words.

It is a matter of vocabulary inclusion vs exclusion. God and Christ are words that exclude atheists and others who do not follow the Jesus Way. The feelings of exlusion have become a main factor in our society today (for example, the 10 Commandments were removed from that Alabama State Supreme Court hallway because some lawyers felt that it violated the separation of Church and State).

Now, the F word is a universal word that includes everyone. It can be used to convey many ideas, it is nonreligious, and crosses racial and social barriers.

The F word is hip, realistic, exciting, forceful, authoritative, and in the case of NBC, a way to boost ratings and to compete with cable TV.

The G and C words are not perceived as being any of those things.

HOW FLAMING, BLOODY, SAD.

The False Dervish on September 29, 2006 at 2:12 PM

Can we get link or better yet a phone number to blast NBC with?

Theworldisnotenough on September 29, 2006 at 1:36 PM

http://www.mediaowners.com/company/nbcuniversal.html

http://www.mediaowners.com/company/generalelectric.html

http://www.nbc.com/Footer/Contact_Us/

SilverStar830 on September 29, 2006 at 2:18 PM

He sold his artistic rights presumably not at the point of a gun. Classic case of wanting to have one’s cake and eat it too. He cashed the check so he needs to shut up.

honora you are 100% right, Vischer could have either stopped everything or made a BIG noise and drawn such attention to this that NBC would have backed down. That tactic worked well for Madonna, she got what she really wanted. Vischer apparently doesn’t want God on NBC as much as Madonna wants herself on a Crucifix. Somebody mail Vischer a copy of The Fountainhead book (or the VHS with Gary Cooper; sorry no DVD) so he can see how real men face down “we” thinkers who want to water down their work.

trainerdave on September 29, 2006 at 2:58 PM

The piece fails to recognize that those are public airwaves, owned by the public. Are you sure that you want “state approved” religious messages?

Since when is NBC government-owned? Boy, that’s NEWS TO ME!!!!

pullingmyhairout on September 29, 2006 at 3:28 PM

Since when is NBC government-owned? Boy, that’s NEWS TO ME!!!!

pullingmyhairout on September 29, 2006 at 3:28 PM

NBC is not gov’t owned; the airwaves are considered the property of the public and NBC is licensed by the government to broadcast over the airwaves. There’s a tacit approval.

honora on September 29, 2006 at 3:43 PM

Thanks to all of you for the background information on this deal.

Valiant on September 29, 2006 at 3:47 PM

Since when is NBC government-owned?

You are misquoting me. The airwaves over which NBC broadcasts are part of the public domain. The public – me, you, everybody you agree with, or disagree with that is a US citizen – constitute (at least theoretically) the state. Although the system works (very well) at keeping the public out of the actual decision making process, the people of this country are the government.

There is a place on TV for Christian scripture – it’s called cable. Maybe HBO would pick them up?? Sandwich those veggies between Bill Maher and Def Comdey Jam?

GregH on September 29, 2006 at 3:54 PM

Hi honora! Happy Friday.

You want something to be scared of–go see Jesus Camp. YIKES!!!!!!

Do they teach suicide bombing?

NBC is not gov’t owned; the airwaves are considered the property of the public and NBC is licensed by the government to broadcast over the airwaves. There’s a tacit approval.

That’s nonsense. If the government tried to grant itself a right of approval for programming, tacit or otherwise, we’d all go ballistic together. Suggesting that tacit government approval of content exists is cheap, dishonest rhetorical trick and you know it. You can do better than that, if you must.

Pablo on September 29, 2006 at 4:41 PM

There is a place on TV for Christian scripture – it’s called cable.

You haven’t watched too much TV, have you GregH? Way back when, Sunday morning TV meant God or the Farm Report. No cartoons anywhere!

When you get a license to drive, the government doesn’t tell you where you can go. Same holds for broadcasting. Remember freedom of the press?

Pablo on September 29, 2006 at 4:44 PM

The upside,for anyone with small children,is that they love to see their faves “again,again!!”. I see an upsurge in sales of the unedited DVD collection and more people getting exposed to these delightful creatons.I guess I’m just a “Chalice half-full” kind of guy.

bbz123 on September 29, 2006 at 4:49 PM

There is a place on TV for Christian scripture – it’s called cable.

I guess this is so we can leave the public airwaves free for Secular Humanist dogma?

{sigh}

Some people just don’t get it.

Lawrence on September 29, 2006 at 5:14 PM

Eff NBC.

God Bless you, Michelle.

doingwhatican on September 29, 2006 at 6:01 PM

NBC gets to make its business decisions as it sees fit. Viewers vote with their remote controls. Such voting heavily influence NBC’s business decisions, however.

Bottom line: Veggie Tales sold out. That’s a shame – their hummable, Broadway-calibre songs and great religion-themed stories transformed into soul-less pablum.

trainerdave on September 29, 2006 at 6:07 PM

Some people just don’t get it.

And they never will no matter how often and how hard reality beats them over the head.

SilverStar830 on September 29, 2006 at 8:40 PM

He sold his artistic rights presumably not at the point of a gun. Classic case of wanting to have one’s cake and eat it too. He cashed the check so he needs to shut up.
honora you are 100% right, Vischer could have either stopped everything or made a BIG noise and drawn such attention to this that NBC would have backed down. That tactic worked well for Madonna, she got what she really wanted. Vischer apparently doesn’t want God on NBC as much as Madonna wants herself on a Crucifix. Somebody mail Vischer a copy of The Fountainhead book (or the VHS with Gary Cooper; sorry no DVD) so he can see how real men face down “we” thinkers who want to water down their work.

trainerdave on September 29, 2006 at 2:58 PM

You guys don’t read the supporting links, do you?

Vischer did not sell his rights — he lost them in bankruptcy proceedings, along with the company, Big Idea Productions, Inc. Classic Media owns the new company, Big Idea, Inc. Two different entities. Phil was retained in a small role, but has little say. Classic Media asked him to prepare some Veggie episodes for NBC, with the idea that they would fill an hour-long time slot. This would be in conjunction with Scholastic and Corus, evidently with the idea of making kids programing ‘worthwhile’ again. Neither NBC or Scholastic had any idea at the beginning what VeggieTales really was. Only after they were well into work on the new format did the partners realize who they had joined up with. It was then that the edits and removals were requested.

Read the background material before you criticize. It’s all here.

Jezla on September 29, 2006 at 10:56 PM

I have not commented in a while. Some topics get me too riled up to dare type what I think. Heh, actually most do. Not that I have EVER missed a single Vent.

But this one I need to hit on. Why is it that the Christian religion is so bad, yet Islamofacism is so good? I do not get it. It just seems so basic to me. Maybe I am not smart enough to be nuanced enough to see the grey areas. All I see is black and white. Good and evil. But according to the dimmocrats, what I see as evil is actually good, and what I see as good is actually evil. And they are supposed to be smarter than me. I mean right? I am just one of the sheeple led by Rush Limbaugh to think and believe whatever he says. I cannot think on my own. I am a racist, homophobic, wifebeating, (Ya, I did marry, another sexist fem hateing facist idealog), and OMG,.I had children, so I hate a womans “right to choose” I am such a hater.

Ummm,. I did write more, but deleted it. I got way off topic. I am in a very sarcastic mood tonight, and took it a little too far.

MalkinFan on September 29, 2006 at 11:06 PM

afa.net has a letter writing campaign to NBC.
https://secure.afa.net/afa/activism/takeaction.asp?id=218

vcferlita on September 29, 2006 at 11:18 PM

I’m surprized to see so many posters weighing in on this. It’s a kids show. I enjoy the original Veggie Tales,and the secular Saturday morning show will be gone in a season, so it’s much ado over fondue. Meaning there are bigger issues to be concerned about than whether NBC is evil for cutting references to God out of a TV show. I’ve known that NBC is evil for years. Duh.

Doug on September 30, 2006 at 2:09 AM

Since it’s obvious the show won’t be around long without its core message, let’s look on the bright side. Some non-christian kids will watch it and want to continue watching it when it goes off the air. Some of those will get their parents to buy the DVDs for them and will get the full christian message from them.

It probably won’t be many kids but some is better than none.

Benaiah on September 30, 2006 at 7:21 PM

Did the owners of the cartoon give up all rights to their property? How can a network censor it without the owners agreeing to the changes? Don’t they hold some responsibility for the editing? I hope they got a good deal of money for tossing their integrity.

Kevin

kmackie6612 on October 1, 2006 at 2:19 PM

I think it is sad that NBC is so biased against religion but it is certainly no surprise. It would have been a good thing if the Veggie Tales people had stood up and said no we will not agree to censorship. However, these videos are going to appeal to a lot of kids and I agree with bbz1 23. The kids who like them are going to want their own copies and will buy the unedited versions. So I can see a possible upside. The Christian school my kids attend have even shown these to high school students and they loved them. They are a lot of fun and well done.

Rose on October 1, 2006 at 5:20 PM

You gotta love the crocodile tears from the creators–golly, we had no idea that our concept would/could be altered. Give me a break. Seems like writing and living values and two different things. honora

Amen

Are you sure that you want “state approved” religious messages? How would you feel if it those vegetables were spewing forth Islamic values? GregH

We already have that here. Before “‘state approved’ religious messages” that is, in the old days of television, Sunday morning was a mass of religious programming until noon. That was the era of ‘Davy and Goliath’. Christmas morning was pure church service until noon. The profane movies we now see on most channels ‘Xmas’ morning would be considered offensive back then.

Today, to enjoy a traditional Christmas I turn on the shopping channel, which presents images like Christmas trees, carolers, musicians and hosts reading books that may even include the ‘G’ word to tiny tots. The other channels intentionally I assume show the most profane – bloody vampire, extra sexed up, evils of the faith entertainment – I don’t know to insult Christians or to neutralize the religiosity.

The Bill of Rights protection of religious freedom was not to protect you from being exposed to religious expression, it was to preserve the right of a person to public religious expression.

Private religious expression, at home in a closet by yourself does not have to be protected because no one hears it but you. The purpose of the amnendment was to keep people from shutting you up in public i.e. the Inquisition, which is what this current movement is.

Television is a publically held bunch of bandwidth which is part of the public square. The schoolroom is a publically held institution the most parents are forced to send their kids by finance or circumstance. If the kids don’t attend the parent goes to jail yet – the child’s exposure is sanitized of the parents’ morality. The public square is for one kind of thought only. That is Inquistition – the purification of counter-thought.

We have islamic channels here, in arabic mostly so Americans cannot understand what is said. We don’t have Satanic channels, yet. Such a forum would not have been considered when our nation was founded because such beliefs were considered immoral, and even today, what we consider immoral is proscribed (Congressmen and pages for example).

Without a line in the sand, a fixed moral system like a religion however, what is moral today is dismantled and expanded to include all sin, as man-boy-love and bestiality are now promoted by some, and forgiven by too many.

The excuse on Veggie-T is a cop-out. As many kids may see the secular Veggies first, and decide the religious version must be perverted, since it had to be cleaned up in later versions – thus continuing the propaganda that religion is obscene.

entagor on October 2, 2006 at 11:17 AM