So says a rabbi writing in the L.A. Times. Actually, he doesn’t say it, the headline says it. But let’s not split hairs.

Fair comparison? Each is famous for scathing criticism and so, inevitably, each is prone to rhetorical excess. The difference is, Coulter’s excesses usually involve gratuitous mean-spiritedness, which suggests malign intent; see, e.g., her cracks about the Jersey Girls enjoying their husbands’ deaths or Justice Stevens being poisoned. Sultan’s excesses tend towards overgeneralization, e.g., “All Muslim women — even American ones, though they won’t admit it — are living in a state of domination.” Not true — but true enough, and decidedly well intended. That distinction is why Sultan is an asset to her side while Coulter, ultimately, is a liability.

There’s also the small matter of who their respective targets are. Coulter says she wishes McVeigh had blown up the Times building, which, recent developments notwithstanding, is a lot further than most right-wingers would be willing to go to oppose liberalism. To oppose Islamism, red in tooth and claw, though — that’s a different story, and that’s what Sultan’s got in her crosshairs.

If you haven’t seen the video clip that made Sultan famous, watch it now. The one from February is, I believe, MEMRI’s all-time most downloaded clip.

Update: A contact at MEMRI confirms that it is their most-viewed clip — with more than six million downloads.